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VOLUME LIV. No. 1. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., SATURDAY, JANUARY 2, 1909. Subscription— $3.00 Per Year. 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday. January 2, 1909. 



$5,000 



REOPENED 



GUARANTEED. 



$ 5,000 



The State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 1 



GUARANTEED. 



Foals of Mares Covered in 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 

$2900 for Trotting Foals. $2100 for Pacing Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Entries to close February 1, '09. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$ I00 1o Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

Mare was bred. 

FORTWO- YEAR -OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1911 

TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS .... $800 
TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS 500 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR-TH REE- YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1912 



THREE-YEAR-OLD 
THREE-YEAR-OLD 



TROTTERS 
PACERS 



S2000 
1 500 



KXTHANt'K PAYMKNTS — $J to nominate mare on February 1. 1909, when mime, color, description of mare and stallion hred to must hf Riven- $ r i lulv 1 

1909; $5 December 1. 1909: $10 on Yearlings, February !, 1910: $10 on Two-Year-olds. February 1, 1911; $10 on Three- Year-olds February 1 191' •»«»#• 

STARTING I'AYMKNTS— $15 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three- Year-Old Pace- $50 to start 
in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when BiUll payment., to Htart whether the horKe entered In a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts Hint start at two yearn old ore not barred from starting again In the three-year-old division*. 

For Cnlr.v Blank* and further particulars, address the Secretory. 

CONDITIONS : 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2-in-3, and for Three-Year-Okls, 3-in-5. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three-Year-Olds, 100 yards 
If a mure proves barren or slips or lias n dead foal or twins, or If either the marc or foal dies before Fehroarj I, lino, lu-r nominator nay sell <ir transfer liis 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will he no return of a payment, nor will any entry he liable for more than amount 
paid in or contracted for. In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must he given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1!M»S. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $."> 000 the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 
Bntrles open to the world. Write for Entry Blanks to 



B. F. RUSH, 

President. 



J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 



810 Due on Three-Year-Olds 



In the 



PACIFIC BREEDERS FUTURITY STAKES NO. 6 



$7000 Guaranteed 



Saturday, January 2, '09 

$10 on Each Entry Must be Paid Not Later Than January 2, 1909. 



$7,000 DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: /*r- $7,000 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1,750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomi- 
nators of Dams of Winners and $200 to Owners of Stallions. 

Money divided as follows: 



93000 for Tliree-Yenr-Old Trotters. 
200 fur Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Three-Year-Old Trot. 
1360 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named tl-.e Dam of Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Trot. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three- Year-Old Trot 

when mare «ns hred. 



$1000 for Tliree-Yenr-Old Pacers. 

200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Thrce-Yenr-Old Pace. 
750 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dnni of Winner of 

Two-Yenr-OId Pace. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace 

when mnre was hred. 



BE SURE AND MAKE THIS PAYMENT. 

Payment. 



Last Payment Before Starting 



Address all communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEALD, President. P. W. KKI.I.KY, Secretary. 

P, O. Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cal. 
Office .Hi« Pacific BnJJUUnC, Corner Market anil Fourth Streets. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Robes 



For your 
Automobile 
Or your 
Carriage 



The elegance and quality combined in mir imported 
rolies ami blankets place tbem beyond the pale of com- 
parison. We have tbem in shades, sizes anil prices that 
will please the most fastidious. 

Your carriage or automobile is incomplete without at 
least one of these. They lend style and comfort and 
place you in an atmosphere of luxury and refinement 
which you otherwise cannot obtain. As an elegant and 
appropriate Christmas gift you could make no mnro 
pleasing selection. Call and look them over. We court 
competition. 



Fremont 



at 



Mission 




Phone 
Douglas 
3O00 




TALLION OWNER 



If in need of anything in the line of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Books. Horse Cuts in stock and made from photo-. 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, Pregnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St, CHICAGO. 



Saturday, .January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 50229 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms — One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A CORRESPOXDEXT sends us a long letter in 
which the breeding of a California bred fast trotter 
is called in question and asks the Breeder and Sports- 
man to investigate the matter. The horse has a 
record and for several years his breeding has been 
published in the Year Book, giving sire, name and 
sire of first dam, and sire of second dam, together 
with the name of the breeder, who is now dead. Our 
correspondent writes a very interesting story, but 
there is nothing in it but hearsay and in asking this 
journal to investigate it, we think he is placing a 
burden where it does not belong. While we believe 
the correct breeding of every horse should be firmly 
established where the facts are known, we think that 
when the publishers of the Year Book have been 
furnished with the evidence that justifies them in 
printing the breeding of a horse, that such breeding 
should not be disputed publicly in the press, or 
changed until positive proof is given that it is un- 
true or not entirely correct. If there are any people 
who can give evidence to establish the claim made 
by our correspondent it is their duty to do so, and 
we hope he will ask them to make affidavit to the 
facts as they know them and send them to the proper 
authorities, the American Trotting Register Asso- 
ciation, who will gladly aid in getting the correct 
pedigrees of all horses registered with them or whose 
records appear in the Year Books. If the breeding 
of the horse in question is to be changed the Regis- 
ter Association must have positive proof that it Is 
not as has been given and accepted. We suggest to 
our correspondent that the parties most interested be 
consulted and that they secure all the proof and sub- 
mit it to the American Trotting Register Association 
at Chicago. If it is sufficient to justify the belef that 
the horse in question is not bred as heretofore stated, 
the records will be amended. 

o 

THE TRIAL of Schuyler Walton for running over 
Marvin Holmes at Fresno some months ago came 
up in the Superior Court of that county last week 
and after a bitter and vindictive prosecution, the 
jury stood nine for acquittal to three for conviction. 
The evidence as printed in the Fresno papers failed 
to show that there was any intent whatever on the 
part of Walton in running into the school teacher, 
who died from his injuries some time afterward, but 
for some reason there was a very strong effort made 
to convict him. Our readers will remember that Mr. 
Walton was working out a horse on (he Fresno 
track during the forenoon, and that Professor 
Holmes went to the track with a number of school 
children who were to contest In athletic games. As 
Walton was speeding his horse through the stretch, 
Professor Holmes jumped out and called upon him 
to stop, as there were children on the track. Walton 
tried to avoid hitting the Professor, but to no avail, 
and the latter was thrown some distance, while 
Walton was also thrown from the cart and the horse 
got away, but was stopped and caught. Those who 
know Schuyler Walton know him as one of the kind- 
est, most gentlemanly and most careful of drivers, 
and believe his statement that it was an accident 
that he could not avoid. From the first, howe-.er, 
there was an effort to make it appear that Walton 
had no business on the track, when the real fact is 
the Professor and the children had no business there. 
The Fresno teachers raised a fund to prosecute Wal 
ton. While all fair-minded people believe ihat Mr. 
Walton should have been acquitted, the facl that nine 
of the jury believed him innocent of any wrong will 
in their opinion amount to a vindication. It is said 
the District Attorney will move for a dismissal of the 
case. 



THE FIGHT IS ON between the Anti-Race Track 
League and the race track owners, and as soon as 
the Legislature convenes at Sacramento next week 
there will be something doing along the firing lines 
on both sides. Meetings are being held by the 
League in all parts of the State to denounce race 
track gambling and unite the citizens in a general 
crusade against it, and while the race track owners 
profess to ba confident that no anti-betting legisla- 
tion can be passed at this session, there are many 
well-posted persons who believe a majority of the 
legislators are already pledged to support a meas- 
ure that will either prohibit or greatly curtail all 
race betting. The fight may eventually develop into 
a three-cornered one. The Anti-Race Track League 
desires the complete suppression of all bookmaking 
and poolselling of every nature on horse races; the 
race track people want the laws to remain as they 
are now, while the harness horse owners and the 
owners of the'country tracks would like to see racing 
curtailed so that no track could hold a meeting of 
over thirty days in any one year. In a triangular 
fight like this the opponents of race betting will 
be at a disadvantage, and unless they can join forces 
with those who favor limited racing they will find 
it very difficult to change the present laws in any 
way, and thus the promoters of continuous racing 
would gain a victory and be safe for two years more 
at least. That six or seven months of continuous 
racing every year in California is an evil that needs 
to be suppressed is doubtless the opinion of nine- 
tenths of the voters of the State. A very large pro- 
portion of the people, however, see much good and 
little harm to result from a return to the old time 
fairs and race meetings, which were once held 
throughout the State, the racing at no place continu- 
ing longer than six days, and the few dollars that 
were wagered being handled by the auction and 
mutual systems. In those days, however, the breed- 
ing and racing of thoroughbreds and trotters was 
considered a sport, and every person engaged in it 
looked upon racing as a recreation to be indulged in 
for three or four weeks at most during the summer 
months. Xow, however, a racing plant where thor- 
oughbreds are raced is nothing more nor less than a 
big gambling scheme, by the side of which the old 
Louisiana lottery were a mere bagatelle. In nearly 
every State in the Union where racing has been 
continuous, except California, the people have set 
the seal of their condemnation upon it, pronounced 
it a great evil, and passed laws for its suppression. 
New York and Louisiana were the last States to fall 
in line against race track gambling and now Cali- 
fornia is left as ihe sole refuge of the bookmaker 
wherein to do business unmolested. The great 
prominence that has been given to the gambling 
side of racing by the daily press, and the demoraliz- 
ing effect continuous racing has on legitimate trade, 
to say nothing of the morals of the community, has 
finally resulted in an organized crusade against it 
and if the game is not stopped by the Legislature at 
its coming session there is little doubt but it, will be 
two years from now. Should such a law pass, the 
present racing trust, comprising the clubs owning 
the tracks at Emeryville and Arcadia, will be simply 
getting a dose of their own medicine. When this 
trust was formed a few years ago, it immediately 
issued an edict prohibiting all trucks outside the 
trust from holding running meetings, and making 
outlaws of all horses and owners participating In 
race meetings not authorized by the trust. This was 
done arbitrarily and without any other right than 
might, and since then no track on Ihe Pacific ("oast 
has been able to give a running meeting unless the 
powers that be so willed it, which was very seldom 
the case. If the race track trust can justify itself in 
this action, surely the people of the State can justify 
themselves in saying to the trust:? "You must race 
horses without betting on them, or not at all." And 
there are many reasons why this can be done without 
injury to any legitimate calling or industry. At our 
own California State Fair for two years past the rac- 
ing has been conducted without betting, to the injury 
of no one and to the benefit of the sport. The same 
is true of the racing at Oregon's great annual fair, 
where twenty thousand people pass through the 
gates daily during the week and where larger purses 
are given for races than anywhere on Ihe roast. 
Portland's big exposition, Seattle's fair and Spokane's 
great inter - State exposition are all run 
without bookmaking or poolselling. Probably 
the greatest race meeting held in Amer- 
ica, so far as attendance goes, is al 
Hamline, Minnesota. As high as 100,000 persons at- 



tend on one day and 48,000 is the least for any day 
during the week. The purses hung up range from 
$1000 to $5000 and the larger ones are to be increased 
to $10,000 this year. The greatest horses in the 
country compete at these meetings, yet there is no 
gambling permitted whatever, and has not been for 
years. The cry that any breed of horses depends 
for its improvement on the gambling fraternity being 
given a chance to wager on races is about as foolish 
a statement as has ever been made. The gamblers 
have ruined every business and every sport that 
they have managed to control. They have made the 
thoroughbred horse, one of the most noble of ani- 
mals, a mere machine to rob the public with and 
have driven out of existence many of the greatest 
breeding farms in the country, for it is the gambler, 
and not the reformer, who is responsible for this 
crusade. The California Legislature will meet next 
week, and while the tracks at Emeryville and Arcadia 
may not be legislated against at this session, it will 
not surprise us if a law is passed that will prohibit 
betting on all racing after May 1st, 1909. 

o 

THE BREEDIXG SEASOX will soon begin, and 
every owner of a good stallion should see that the 
location of his horse should be made known to the 
public, as well as the fee that will be asked for his 
services. There are few stallion owners who do not 
believe their horse will be a successful sire if given 
an opportunity, but the majority fail to give their 
horses this chance. Every horse worth asking a fee 
for is worth advertising and whether the owner does 
this advertising through the newspapers or by mail 
and posters he should do it thoroughly and with 
persistent effort. Selling the services of a stallion 
is just like selling goods — the public must know your 
horse is in service, how he is bred, what sort of ani- 
mal he is, and what the fee is before they can de- 
termine whether he is worthy of their patronage. 
The horse that will be turned down by one breeder, 
may be first choice of another, and the way to reach 
all is to advertise him as extensively as possible. 
The majority of stallion owners spend less than the 
price of one service fee in advertising their horses 
each year. Those who advertise liberally, how- 
ever, nearly always find it a good paying investment. 
o 

IT IS REPORTED that the directors of the Sixth 
District Agricultural Association at Los Angeles, 
which Association controls Agricultural Park in that 
city, will ask the California Legislature for an ap- 
propriation of $300,000 with which to construct an 
exposition building on the grounds, where a perma- 
nent exhibition of all the products of the State may 
be maintained. The Sixth District would do a wise 
thing were they to ask the Legislature for an appro- 
priation for a Southern California fair to be held in 
Los Angeles every year. Agricultural Park is suited 
for a fair of large proportions on the plan of the 
best Eastern fairs, and if properly managed such a 
fair would be of great benefit to not only Southern 
California, but the entire State. If California could 
have about four good district fairs — at Los Angeles, 
Fresno, San Jose and Chico, for instance — and the 
exhibitors then meet at the State Fair to decide the 
final championships, we believe the farmers, stock 
breeders and manufacturers of California would all be 
greatly benefitted and much improvement be made 
in the State's products. Los Angeles would do well 
to inaugurate some such scheme. 

o 

THOMAS AND FRANK CARTER, sons of the late 
Martin Carter, have been appointed executors of the 
large estate left by their father. They have not 
yet decided as to what, will be done with the horses 
on Nutwood Stock Farm, but they will all be sold 
eventually, in all probability. They have arranged 
to keep up the payments on all the colts entered in 
stakes, however, of which there are five or six 
on Ihe farm, among them the good filly Ella M. R 
2:16%. by Lord Alwyn, that raced so well as a two- 
year-old in 1908. 

o 

TEN DOLLARS MUST BE PAID TO-DAY on every 
three-year old whose owner desires It to start, in the 
Pacific Breeders' Futurity this year. Recollect, this 
stake is a rich one, $15000 being the portion for three- 
year-old trotters, and $1000 for three-year-old pacers. 
There are no further payments to make except the 
: tailing payments. To-day is the lasl day on which 
this $10 payment can be made. It payment is not 
made on your entry it will be declared out of the 
race. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



FAST TIME IN THE SOUTH. 



High Class Matinee Racing it Los Angeles and San 
Bernardino. 



. Christmas Day was thoroughly enjoyed by the 
horsemen of Southern California who atended the 
matines of the Los Angeles and Riverside driving 
clubs, there being many excellent races at the first 
named track and record breaking at the other. 

The Los Angeles matinee attracted an atendance 
of three thousand jieople who cheered the winners of 
five as good races as have been seen at Agricultural 
Park track in many days. 

The features of the afternoon program were the 
free for all events, in which 2:11% was the fastest 
heat of each. The free for all trot was won by Geo. 
T. Peckers with his handsome mare Helen Dare by 
Zombro. She beat Mr. William Garland's gelding 
Romeo in straight heats in 2:17 and 2:11%, Romeo 
making a break in the initial heat, which accounted 
for the slow time. The second heat was a horse race, 
however, but the mare had it on the gelding, and won 
the heat after a good contest in the excellent time 
of 2:11%. Helen Dare is certainly capable of be- 
coming a member of Zombro's rapidly growing 2:10 
list. 

Siegfried, a son of Silver Coin 2:10, won the free 
for all pace in straight heats, beating Dewey and 
Mandolin. The fastest heat was in 2:11%. 

The get of Neernut 2:12% made an excellent 
showing by winning two races, the 2:18 trot and 
2:25 pace. 

A handicap race closed the program but was not 
the contest it was expected to be as the scratch 
horse won with ease and at no time was there a 
doubt as to his ability to keep in front. 

In the first race Leap Year Wilkes, a mare by Stan- 
ton Wilkes 2: 10%, he by Nutwood Wilkes, got off be- 
hind all the others, but finished fifty feet in front 
of the second horse. The afternoon was warm and 
pleasant and the close finishes in nearly every heat 
made the racing most enjoyable. The results: 

First race — 2:30 mixed: 
Leap Year Wilkes, blk. m., by Stanton Wilkes 

(A. B. Miller) 1 1 

Mazeppa, blk. m. (Charles Chick) 2 4 

Dan Wilkes, b. g. (George Aiken) 2 3 

Best time, 2:27%. William H. Taft and Clara G. 



finished as named. 

Second race — 2:18 trot: 
(ioldennut, ch. h., by Neernut (Geo. W. Ford. .12 1 

Walter Wilkes, blk. g. (W. C. Weant) 4 1 2 

Zonibretta, br. m., (L. J. Christopher) 3 3 3 

Pest time, 2:16%. Richie Paron finished last. 
Third race — Free-for-all pace: 
Siegfried, b. g., by Silver Coin (Frank P. Long) . .1 1 

Dewey, br. h. (A. E. Ingram) 2 2 

Mandolin, b. g. (L. E. McClellan) 3 3 

Rest time 2:11%. 
Fourth race — Free-for-all trot: 
Helen Dare. br. m., by Zombro (George T. 

Peckers) 1 1 

Romeo, b. g. (William Garland) 2 2 

Pest time, 2:11%. 
Fifth race — 2:25 pace: 



Tough Nut. b. g.. by Neernut (L. E. McLellan) . .1 1 

Major Gifford, g. g. (R. I. Prescott) 2 2 

Silveratta, g. m. (W. A. Glasscock) 3 4 

Pest time, 2:22%. Wandering Roy and Wild Rose 
finished as named. 

Sixth race — Handicap; mixed one mile dash: 
Bonnie Crocket (wire), b. m.. by Bonnie Russell 

(George L. Pierce) 1 

General Garcia (150 feet), b. g. (J. Mc.Graw) 2 

Fresno Roy (450 feet), ch. g. (W. A. Glasscock) 3 

Pest time, 2:31. Rex Gifford. Jr., finished last. 



A Riverside horse carried off the honors of the 
Christmas matinee race meeting at San Bernardino. 
W. L. Scott's Kid Wilkes smashing the Associa- 
tion track trotting record. The time was lowered to 
2:10%, a record of which the owner may well be 
proud. 

Of Kid Wilkes' performance and other features of 
the meet the San Bernardino Sun says: 

In winning the free-for-all trot Kid Wilkes, owned 
by W. L. Scott of Riverside, driven yesterday by 
George H. Parker, suddenly sprang into prominence 
as a fast stepper and a probable comer for next 
season's circuit events. He is a four year old and 
this is the first time that he has shown any remarka- 
ble speed, never having made a mile in less than 2:20 
previously in the short time he has been worked. 

Kid Wilkes is by Stanton Wilkes, and his dam 
is a sister of the dam of Velox the famous young 
stepper of the local track. Horsemen yesterday ex- 
pressed the belief that he will be one of the fastest 
Southern California horses in his class on the track 
next season. He won the race yesterday easily, 
though in R. Ambush he had a fast one for an oppon- 
ent. The first heat he drove out easily, but in the 
second the finish was close, there being less than a 
length between Wilkes and Ambush. 

In the free-for-all pace another startler was given 
the crowd by the lowering of the time to 2:09%. The 
first heat of this race was easily taken by Delilah, 
Mac. O. D.. owned by Dr. Ramsey of Riverside, strik- 
ing the wheel of the sulky on the last turn and 
putting him off his feet for an instant, so that De- 
lilah jogged home easily in 2:13. Put the second 
heat was a race from the wire, and it was only by 
hard driving as the time of 2:09% shows that De- 
lilah was able to win. 



THE AMERICAN SADDLE HORSE. 



(Gen. J. P. Castleman in Chicago Preeders Gazette.) 

In the early history of America when pleasure 
vehicles were unknown, and down through a 
period when pleasure vehicles were expensive, the 
customary transportation of man was on the back 
of the horse. The easy gaited horse was preferred, 
just as he is today in all tropical countries where 
riding on horseback is general and where distances 
are long. 

Within the writer's memory, extending back much 
more than half a century, the riding of horses was 
usual in going to church, in visiting, in going to 
the various county seats on county court days; 
and the writer is numbered among the older men 
of his country who remembered when the custom 
was to see hitched aoout the public square hun- 
dreds of horses to hitching racks provided for this 
purpose, when public stables overflowed with hitches 
and feeds demanded by the great influx of larmers, 
to whom county court day was an occasion of gen- 
eral assembly. This general assembly was a time to 
exchange views on politics, on business, on the 
conditions of crops or on the prospects of the 
weather. Often have I heard the inquiry on these 
county court days: "Neighbor, have you seen Andy 
Gorham?" Answered by: "No, I have not seen 
him, but he is in town, for I saw his saddle horse 
hitched in front of the Northern Rank." 

It is well remembered how usual it was for the 
men, and the women, to atend church on horse- 
back. How the good women used to wear a loose 
fitting black skirt slipped on over attractive costume 
which this skirt was intended to protect. How after 
the rider dismounted at the church yard this skirt 
was hung on the pommel of the side-saddle until the 
religious services were ended, and how the skirt was 
then re-adjusted, and the horse mounted, and the 
men and the women rode from their neighborhood 
church back to their comfortable, and sometimes to 
their very beautiful country homes. And back a gen- 
eration beyond we know how the earlier settlers 
came from the older states to the newer states on 
horseback. This intimate association of man and 
horse begat in man a wish for a more attractive 
horse and persistent selection followed until the sad- 
dle horse used in America grew to be more and more 
beautiful. 

In all breeds of animals production which marks 
the beginning of the family is the result of experi- 
ment rather than of scientific endeavor, and often 
disappointment follows the efforts to reproduce the 
results at first obtained. It is only by continued 
selection and by continued experiment that type is 
finally produced, and even when produced breeding 
them on fixed lines alone can preserve such types. 
It is well enough to bear in mind the experience of 
the Knglishman who bred his pointer bitch to an 
English bull — he got a dog, but he neither had a 
pointer nor a bull. 

It is well-nigh three-quarters of a century since 
W. V. Cromwell of Fayette County, Kentucky, fan- 
cied that Denmark (Thoroughbred) crossed on se- 
lected mares would bring satisfactory results. 
Through this beginning was started a wonderful 
breed of horses destined finally to found the Ameri- 
can saddle hose, and from this beginning came the 
Denmark family, the family of horses whose pre- 
potency has never been equaled in the annals of 
breeding. Indeed, from generation to generation the 
Denmarks have transmitted the fine heads, the 
arched necks, the sharp withers, obliqued shoulders 
and hard sinewy flat bones, general freedom from 
unsoundness, fine coats of hair, and what the old 
saddle horse breeders used to term "two enders," 
that is to say a horse whose habit was to carry 
lofty tail and head. Ii is rare indeed that this last 
named Denmark characteristic is not conspicuous in 
the Denmark horses; it is a striking indication 
of the breed. Nicking or artificial means of elevating 
the tail was unheard of and show an evidence of 
the absence of Denmark blood. 

The greatest progenitor of this wonderful family 
of Denmark was known as Gaines Oenmark. He 
was extremeely black with exquisite finish and ex- 
ceedingly beautiful, was 15.2 high, weighed about 
1.050 lbs., was brilliant in action and he demon- 
strated unmatched endurance. To his offspring this 
matchless beauty and wonderful endurance have 
been transmitted to the present day. 

When twelve years old, after nine years of stud 
service, and after his children and their offspring 
had stocked hundreds of farms with Denmark 
horses. Gaines Denmark was "pressed." as we cav- 
alrymen in active service called it. by one of Mor- 
gan's cavalry in 1863. This wonderful horse after- 
wards started with Morgan on what is known as 
Morgan's Ohio raid, and marched across Tennessee, 
across Kentucky, across Indiana, across Ohio, swim- 
ming the Ohio river at Buffington's Island, and 
marched back through Virginia and Tennessee and 
reported again for regular cavalry duty. The de- 
scendants of this Denmark who accompanied him 
on this wonderfui continuous march, covering about 
1,200 miles, were ridden by something over 400 of 
Morgan's cavalry who escaped from the general 
pitulation at Buffington's Island. Much of this 
arduous service in march was made on small grain 
rations and on grass. Never in the history of the 
world was such endurance shown in the cavalry ser- 
vice. 

General Basil W. Duke in an article on this horse 
as a cavalry horse says: 

"When Morgan marched from Sparta in August, 



1S62, to surprise a garrison at Gallatin, he accom- 
plished the distance of fully 90 miles, including de- 
tours made to conceal his route, in about 25 hours. 
On tiie Ohio raid, after more than two weeks of very 
severe marching, his command, then about 2,100 
strong, marched without halting from Summansville, 
Ind., to a point 28 miles east of Cincinnati, a distance 
which may be fairly estimated at 94 miles. This 
march was accomplished in about 31 hours. Many — 
indeed, the greater number — of the Kentucky horses 
which had started on the raid performed this march 
without flinching; and many of them kept on to Buf- 
f'ngton, some even bearing their riders across the 
Ohio River and returning to the Confederacy. The 
horses which had been impressed in Indiana and 
Ohio failed in such an ordeal, never lasting more 
than a day or two, and often succumbing after a 
ride of eight or ten hours. The American saddle- 
hied horse is very valuable for cavalry service, be- 
causee of other reasons than merely his superior 
powers of endurance. His smoother action and eas- 
ier gaits render the march less fatiguing, he suc- 
cumbs less readily to privations and exposures and 
responds more cheerfully to kind and careful treat- 
ment. He acquires more promptly and perefctly the 
drill and the habits of the camp and the march, and 
his intelligence and courage make him more relia- 
ble on the field." 

The war in 1865 came to a close and the breeding 
of saddle horses continued. Twenty years ago the 
breeders of this great horse organized a register 
and were incorporated as the American Saddle 
Horse Dreeder's Association. This organization was 
effected for the co-operative protection of the breed 
of horses which had been in a desultory way pro- 
tected by thoughtful men for half a century. 

This American saddle horse is, it might be said, 
made up of composite blood, built on lines most 
often Thoroughbred where experience has demon- 
strated satisfactory results would follow. Rut in 
the preservation of this beautiful and useful type 
it is found that because of the prepotency of Den- 
mark sires the use of stallions having strong in- 
fusion of Denmark blood is certainly important and 
probably essential. 

Registration through the established stud book 
each year increases and emphasizes the growing in- 
terest from more than one-half the states of the 
Union. Preeding farms devoted, at least in part, 
to the production of the American saddle horse are 
found throughout the country. A total registration 
of more than 9,000 horses have been accepted. The 
American Saddle Horse Rreeder's Association is 
prosperous and has ample means. 

After having published six volumes with an aver- 
age of about 1.000 registered stallions and mares to 
each volume, the association is now having revised 
these stud books for the purpose of correcting errors 
which inevitably find their way into such initial 
movements. The first volume of this Revised Reg- 
ister contains 3,000 pedigrees, 1,500 mares and 1,500 
stallions, and has already been published. This will 
be followed shortly by the second volume and ere 
long by the third volume, and within twelve months 
by a history of the American saddle horse. 

The American saddle horse is recognized by the 
I'nited States Government, and is one of the three 
American brees of horses. Resides this recogni- 
tion of our own government, the American saddle 
horse finds favor in many countries or the world. 
Peyond the utility of this horse under saddle and 
in harness, it is probable that no cavalry horse in 
the world is his peer, and our western states with 
sturdy native mares would find great advantage and 
profit in crossing such mares upon carefully selected 
Denmark stallions, producing a cavalry horse that 
must grow to be valuable. Our government is in- 
clined now to select better horses and to pay better 
prices and today more than at any previous time 
we have in official positions of influence in the army 
men who realize that action and endurance in the 
cavalry horse count for more than the mere specifi- 
cations of height, weight and color. Poor horses 
furnished at contract for $140 no longer satisfy the 
demand, and the government must come to pay 
double as much in order to secure horses for the 
cavalry service fitted for such uses. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

A. J. Gillett, Modesto — Rustic, gray horse, Register 
Number 917, was by Hambletonian 725, dam by 
Henry Belmont, son of Williamson's Belmont; Gen. 
Booth, record 2:30%. was by Geo. M. Patchen 30, 
dam Lady Megg Dodds: Booth 8314 was by Mam- 
brino Dudley 967. dam by Hambletonian 10; there 
were three Alexanders — Alexander 490 was by Geo. 
M. Patchen Jr. 31, dam Lady Crum by Rrown's 
Bell founder; this horse was owned in California and 
is probably the one whose breeding you desire to 
know. Oregon George was a running bred horse of 
quarter stock, we believe, but we do not have his 
breeding at hand. 



J. N. A., Salinas— Mamie Riley 2:16 was foaled 
in 1893, sired by McKinney 2:11%, dam Sister to 
San Pedro, by Del Sur 1098, second dam (dam of 
San Pedro 2:10%) by Keating Horse. Mamie Riley 
was bred by Mr. L. A. Maybury, Los Angeles. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



> 



Saturday, January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE OLD CAMPAIGNER. 



(H. J. Klein in Kentucky Stock Farm.) 

"Well, I guess they are going right on and kill 
racing everywhere," said the Amateur. "First thing 
we know a 2:10 trotter won't be worth as much as a 
weanling calf. They are turning the big breeding 
farms into cattle pastures and truck patches and — " 
"Take back, take back," almost shouted the Old 
Campaigner. "You are going to a break, and if you 
do you'll come out of it minus a full set of boots, 
three or four shoes and an overcheck and you 
won't be able to hit your stride again for a month. 
You are thinking about the gallopers and you never 
owned as much of the apparatus for racing that kind 
of horses as would cost six bits. Every time a state 
legislature puts a crimp in the betting business you 
and a lot of fellows like you get the notion into your 
heads that the whole business of racing horses is 
going straight to the bow-wows and is certain to 
take the racing interests of the entire universe 
along with it. Nothing of the kind ever has hap- 
pened and it never will happen. I know the trou- 
bles which beset the racing of the thorougnbreds 
have hurt a whole lot of people financially. It 
hurts to be forced to take a few hundred for a stud 
horse whose real price a few months ago was so far 
into the thousands that nobody but a millionaire 
could afford to think of owning him and it stings 
like all possessed to let go of a band of brood mares 
for less than the same number of good mules would 
fetch at the weekly auction. But that is not enough 
loss to the horse business in this vale of tears to make 
you or any other common citizen get the weeps. If 
cutting out the betting ring is going to kill thorough- 
bred racing then all I have to say is that the sooner 
the funeral is held the better for all concerned. Not 
that I have anything against the thoroughbred nor 
against the betting ring. Properly conducted, racing 
the gallopers and betting on them can do no great 
amount of harm to the great mass of the people. 
But if they are both to be wiped out the only thing 
to do is to make the obesquies as decently courte- 
ous as possible and go on about our business. With 
regrets, of course. But we have plenty for which to 
be thankful, those of us who are tangled up with 
harness racing. 

"I don't suppose you ever stopped worrying long 
enough to take stock and see precisely where the 
trotting horse business stands. You keep track of 
what is happening on the Grand Circuit and what 
its sturdy brother the Great Western is doing and if 
the least little thing happens to either one to give it 
the same sort of set back a stone bruise used to give 
you when you were a kid you think the whole busi- 
ness of breeding and racing the harness horse is 
about to vanish into thin air. 1 expect you laid 
awake nights for a week after the announcement 
was made that the Readville track was to be sold, 
whereas you would have had all the sleep that was 
coming to you if you had been wise enough to 
remember that the New England Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association is very much alive and that 
it is the thing that counts. There never yet was a 
live association that could not find some sort of a 
track over which the trotters and pacers could race 
for its money. Historic Glenville, about whose fate 
you worried so greatly, is about to pass on into the 
list of things that were. But its place will be taken, 
at once, by a track of the name of Randall, not at all 
historic, and not by any means as musical, for a 
name, as the one it is to succeed. Which, however, 
will not keep the money won over it from buying 
just as much feed and paying just as much freight 
as if the treasurer had his office at what you call 
'the famous yellow mile.' The trouble with you 
and a lot of other premature mourners is that you 
weep over the passing of the shadow and get your 
eyes so bleared that you can't see the substance, t 
might be in tune right now to shed some tears over 
Buffalo and Poughkeepsie. They have been 
Hughesed into the list of uncertainties. But it might 
help you some to remember that Empire City and 
Brighton Beach once responded to the footfalls of 
the best harness horses in the world and then pass- 
ed out of the annals of that sort of sport, without 
any foot work on the part of a governor to aid their 
going. Did the game suffer permanently because of 
their exit? Did the price of a good trotter depreciate 
perceptibly? Not any, my son. 

"There were five hundred, or Iesv, trotters and 
pacers raced on the Grand Circuit in 1908 about 
the same number on the Great Western. By that I 
mean that number of horses started one time or an- 
other. The total for the two biggest circuits in the 
whole country was not more than a thousand. But 
did you ever stop to think that they were less than 
one-tenth of the grand total of horses that started 
in harness races during the season in the United 
Slates and Canada? Of course you didn't. And that 
is one of the reasons why you get so all-fired blue 
when a grand stand burns or a trotting track goes 
out of business. 

"Where were the other eight thousand raced. Sit 
up close and 1 will tell you. Everywhere! From 
Calgary to St. John and from Winnepeg to Dallas. 
That is a wide range of country my boy and Its full 
of race tracks where the trotter and the pacer hustle 
for purses that range all the way from fifty to fifty 
thousand dollars. And most of those tracks are of 
the half-mile variety. And th»y hang up their 
purses year after year with never a thought about 
the troubles of the betting ring. Some of them, 
hundreds of them, have been doing business at the 
old stand twice as many years as you have lived and 



if I recollect correctly you cast your first vote in 
1896. Why, boy, there are race tracks west of Co- 
lumbus, Ohio, that have been holding annual meet- 
ings ever since the close of the Mexican war. It has 
got to be a common thing for a track to announce 
its fiftieth annual meeting. Go to one of them and 
you will find some man interested either as a past- 
master of the speed ring or an honorary member of 
the society who can tell you an interesting story 
about the race that Topgallant trotted against time, 
three miles In 8:11 in 1830 and how he ran away 
from school to see it and what an awful licking his 
father gave him six months afterward when he got 
all the facts in the case. And he of Topgallant 
story is but one perhaps of a dozen men in the same 
community who cherish the remembrance of an 
early trotting hero and who, through that love they 
hold for the trotter have been the leaven that has 
leavened the whole lump in that region and has 
spread the love of harness-racing until it is a part 
and parcel of the everyday life of most of the men 
and not a few of the women. They sit and talk, in 
front of the livery barn, or the chief hotel, about 
the trotters and pacers which made history in their 
early days and compare them with the trotters and 
pacers which are making history now. The young- 
sters hear the prattle and get the fever and, in their 
turn, will pass it on to the coming generations. 
There is no way to kill the germ. It is of the ever- 
lasting kind. But there is nothing of that sort to 
build up the galloper. Now please don't misunder- 
stand me. I am not 'agin' ' the thoroughbred and I 
regret that it has not pleased Providence to prosper 
the good men who are interested in breeding and 
racing him. What I want to impress on your mind 
is the fact that a sort of love or sentiment, instilled 
into local minds and kept alive through the reminis- 
cent old-fellows has made the harness horse sport a 
live-forever thing. The .sport of racing thorough- 
breds lacks that element of strength and that is why 
it can not live. As an adjunct to the life of what a 
poor proof-reading friend of mine unintentionally 
dubbed the Jay White Way it managed to become 
quite prominent. It helped the sea-food purveyors 
of New Orleans and it did no particular harm to the 
incomes of the red-light landlords in Cincinnati. As 
a boon to the hotels of sunny Los Angeles and earth- 
quaken San Francisco it is without a peer. But in the 
country districts where the love for the harness 
horse flourishes and refuses to die it is an almost 
unknown quantity. Once in a while, as for instance 
Kokomo, Indiana, a country city, produces some one 
who, by accident or misfortune, gets mixed in with 
the gallopers — Kokomo produced Ted Sloan — and in 
that way there arises a limited demand for news as 
to what the thoroughbreds are doing. But for some 
years about all the information from their big meet- 
ings has come out of the betting ring and as it con- 
veyed nothing concerning the horses that anybody 
but the man with a bet down wanted to know, public 
interest in it, especially at the towns served by the 
local trains only, ceased to be of sufficient volume to 
notice. But the denizen of the town that is not a 
metropolis can hike down to the postoffice or the 
livery barn any evening and get all the latest in the 
field of the trotting horse and what is more, can 
understand it all when it is told to him. Chances are 
he knows a lot about blood lines and when you tell 
him that the best pacer of the year is by a son of 
Mambrino King and out of a daughter of Redwald 
he will tell you off the reel what son of Mambrino 
King is the guilty party, and that Redwald was a son 
of Lord Russell, whose dam was an own sister to 
Maud S., and that Maud S. was out of the dam of 
Nutwood, who sired the stallion that Zeke Winter- 
bottom raced through the Calamus Root Circuit in 
1892 and won seven races out of nine starts. You 
cannot get away from that sort of infection. It is 
everywhere. One day last summer most all the 
population of Koseville, Illinois, went over to Gales- 
burg to see Minor Heir go against time. Why? 
Because a yenug man in their town bred Mino-- 
Heir. Nobody in that town ever bred a thorough- 
bred that cleaned up the whole earth. And the 
chances are that nobody there ever will breed one. 
Most of that sort of diversion is left these days, or 
was left when there was anything of it to leave, to 
men with money. Not that anyone has any grudge 
against breeding the thoroughbred, i have none, I 
am sure. What I am talking about is conditions as 
they exist and not as we would have them. The 
country districts are full of men who have been 
touched by the trotting horse virus— bug' they call 
it — and they don't recover from the disease in a 
hurry. Most of them never get over it. And the 
ailment never did hurt any one much. It has been 
known to cut a big gash in a bank account and it 
has kept some men away from business as much as 
three months at a time. Which, it is a pleasure to 
note, did not hurt the business any and made the 
vacationers better business men when they got back 
with their lungs fresh-air-cleaned, their blood cir- 
culating properly and their brains cleared op so that 
they could tackle any trade problem that might be 
presented. That and several other things account 
for the spread of the trotting horse fever until it has 
become a national malady and is positively incurable 
in the sections where the pastures are worth own- 
ing." 

"But," interposed the Amateur, when he saw a 
chance to wedge in a query, "what is to become of 
racing if all the states enforce their laws against 
gambling?" 

"Sorry to awaken you, my boy," answers the Old 
Campaigner, "but outside of a very few towns the 



betting on harness racing cuts about as much figure 
as the Independence Party did at the last Presiden- 
tial election. I am free to say that there is more or 
less betting at a majority of the harness meetings. 
But if anybody thinks there is a wild scramble at 
most of them to get to the auction block or the coop 
of the bookmaker and let go of money, he ought to 
put his guess in to cold storage and go out and 
gather up the facts. The plain truth of the business 
is that the betting ring at ninety out of every hun- 
dred trotting tracks is more of an accommodation 
station than anything else. The number of patrons 
is decidedly limited and the betting fever they create 
is milder than the chicken pox you had the spring 
you were five years old. 1 know a whole lot of peo- 
ple wouldn't believe it if you proved it to them, 
but it is the gospel truth that at a raft of betting 
meetings this year more money was wagered, and 
actually put up, by horsemen hanging over the 
quarter-stretch fence in the morning watching the 
work-outs, than was risked in the auction pools. I 
know one bookmaker who lost his voice trying to 
get the populace to bet him 1 to 5 on a horse that 
had no other chance to lose than to fall over the 
fence and break his neck. I was at another meeting 
where the local ministers attended the <acing one day 
in a body to see the devil at work in the betting 
ring. They hung around the auction box for a half 
hour and found things so dull that they wandered off 
to the stables and first thing they knew were so inter- 
ested in the fast horses and the preparations for the 
days racing that they forgot what had induced them 
to visit the track. Now, here is the plain truth 
about the money that is bet on harness races: Most 
of it is carried from town to town by the few men 
who bet it. Nearly all of them are horse owners or 
are out for a little diversion. They do not make 
betting on races a business. The town boy who 
strings along with any of them would bet his money 
just the same on any old proposition that passed 
under his vision. After they have been in his midst 
for four or five days they pass on and leave him to 
buckle down to work and lose his loose change 
shaking dice at the corner cigar store. They have 
not done anything to make a gambler out of him. 
In all probability he had more gambling inclination 
to start with them they ever had. It is different with 
the running game in the big cities and you know so 
well why it is that I do not propose to waste a 
minute of time explaining it to you. So you see the 
reason the sport of harness racing appeals to so 
many thousands of men is that they all know a little 
bit about breeding, it having been brought home to 
them by the cross roads stud horse, of standard 
breeding. They like to go where they can talk 
about blood lines and just as soon as one of them 
gets a colt that he bred himself there is nothing 
that will satisfy his longing to mingle with fellow 
sufferers except to hike to a race meeeting and 
mingle. The more he mingles the deeper the virus 
digs and the deeper it digs the more liable it is to 
spread from him to his neighbors. It's exactly like a 
case of mumps carried into the district school by 
little Johnny Jones — spreads like all-possessed until 
it covers the entire community. But it differs from 
the mumps in the one respect that it is absolutely 
incurable. I have known men to recover from the at- 
tack of the running-horse bug, some of them with 
pretty bad cases too — but I do not recall, in the 
experience of a period extending over thirty years, 
of a single case of absolute recovery from the bite 
of the trotting-horse bug. Nature evidently intend- 
ed it to be everlasting and I opine that the reason 
is it is so good for a man. And it has nipped 
more men than any othere bug, especially in the 
country districts. And that is the proper place for 
harness racing. It was never intended for a big city 
sport. The action is not quick enough and there is 
something to it beside the gambling feature. At 
least, in its best estate it is nothing but horse rac- 
ing and the only way a man can indulge his propen- 
sity for risking his dollars on a chance is take it 
down among the swipes and engage in the exciting 
game of pitching dollars at a toe mark. 

"So you take your regular sleep as regularly as 
the nights come along. Get a membership in the 
biggest and best Don't Worry Club you know of. 
Stop trying to figure out to the day the demise of 
harness racing. There was once a boy who took to 
school every day a bigger and a better apple than 
any of his schoolmates. There was always a rivalry 
for the core. Hut every day the lucky boy ate his 
apple and ate every bit of it, announcing as he 
stowed away each luscious morsel : 'Needn't wait, 
boys, there ain't goin' to be no core.' Any you need 
not wait for the death of the sport of harness racing, 
for there ain't going to be no death." 

H. J. K. 

o 

winner «.f the Large*! Bnlf-Mlle Stake in Ohio, 1008. 

Owned by If. K. DKVEHKHX, Cleveland, O. 
Raced by "Sandy" Smith, of Glenville, O. 

Troy Chemical Co., liinnliamton, N. Y.: 

Gentlemen: — 1 think It la the greatest stuff in the 
world and I have seen or used about everything that 
Is put on the race horses. .lust see what It has done 
for Orrln C. When I took him this summer he had 
two bowed tendons In front and was entirely broken 
down behind. lOverybody said he could not be raced, 
it was tin- worst case I ever saw. I had used "Save- 
Thc-lforse" anil knew what it hail done for others, 
so I went to work, with the result that I took him to 
the races, started him six times over half-mile tracks 
and once over a mile track. In the first two races he 
was second, forcing the winners to lower tin- record 
each time. He won his third race of four heats, was 
second anain. and then won three races; the last was 
the M and M. $2,600 stake at Lima, O. I brought him 
home sound and he will prove a winner in 1!»0!I sea- 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



I NOTES AND NEWS g 

Happy New Year to all. 



May 1909 be a record breaker for prosperity. 

It is time for associations to get to work on pro- 
grams. 



Your colls and fillies are all a year older than 
they were last Thursday. 

The dam of that fast pacing yearling filly Soumise 
is said to be by Robert Basler. 



The Fresno City Driving Club will give a racing 
program on Washington's Birthday. 

With a reasonable rainfall the year 1909 should 
be a very prosperous one in California. 



The California State Fair Futurity lias been reopened 
to close IVI.ruary 1st. See advertisement OB page % 



Don't forget that several stakes close today, and 
payments are due on colts and fillies entered in 
several that closed earlier. 



The San Joaquin Valley circuit, comprising the 
cities of Fresno, Hanford. Tulare and Bakersfleld will 
give fairs and race meetings this year. 



There are sixty-five 2:10 performers whose dams 
are unknown to the compilers of the Year Book. 
Some of these dams can never be traced, but there 
are others whose breeding could be ascertained if 
their breeders' addresses were known. 



Although the track at Arcadia had a special pro- 
gram of great drawing power for the runners on 
Christmas day, the Los Angeles Driving Club's races 
at Agricultural Park, where there is no betting or 
liquor sold, drew a crowd of three thousand people. 

How many associations that propose giving harness 
race meetings on the Pacific Coast in 1909, will have 
their programs ready for announcement in our Stal- 
lion Number to be issued February 27th? Last year 
the North Pacific Circuit and the Breeders' Associa- 
tion announced their programs in our Stallion num- 
ber. 



Salinas, Santa Rosa, Pleasanton, Woodland, Sac 
ramento, Marysville and Chico are mile track towns 
that are pretty sure to have good harness meetings 
in 1909. If the programs can be announced in Feb- 
ruary the entry lists will be larger than if a later 
date is selected for the announcements. 



Among the handsome Christmas numbers that 
have come to this office since our last issue are the 
Trotter and Pacer of New York, the North Pacific 
Rural Spirit of Portland, and the Pacific Homestead 
of Salem. All are excellent numbers fully up to the 
high standard of their former holiday editions. 



Mr. W. O. White, proprietor of the Black Hawk 
Stables, Fresno, who purchased the McKinney geld- 
ing Adam G. 2:11% from J. W. Zibbell a few months 
ago, has put the gelding to pacing and writes that 
he takes to it like a duck to water, goes without 
straps and can already pace as fas as he could trot. 



During the summer months Jay Eye See 2:10, now 
in his thirty-first year, was reported very feeble, 
says the Horse Review. He is now at Pleasant 
View Farm, Mt. Pleasant, Wis., property of Chas. 
Bull, and is much stronger. The old hero is fed 
ground food, which agrees with him, and from present 
appearance looks to be good for several more years 
of life. 



Mr. A. B. Rodman, of Woodland, called on Wil- 
liam Hashagan, of that place, who is at St. Luke's 
hospital in this city, this week, and found him 
considerably improved. While he is not yet able 
to talk, Mr. Hashagan recognized his friend and 
was very glad to see him. Mr. Hashagan's right 
side is paralyzed and his vocal cords and tongue 
are also affected. The physician in attendance has 
strong hopes that he will be able to sit up and per- 
haps use his limbs before long. 



The grounds of the Clackamas County Fair As- 
sociation at Canby are becoming a popular rendez- 
vous for Oregon horsemen and it is expected that 
more than 50 horses will be taken there to spend 
the winter. The track is In fair condition and is 
very advantageously situated for the winter train- 
ing. L. B. Lindsey, from Albany, has rented the 
Charles N. Wait barns and has six horses there. He 
will bring more animals later. San Casto, of Sa- 
lem, a well known Northwest horseman, has eight 
horses at the Fair grounds, and J. R. Sawyer, of 
Portland, will move to Canby for the winter, bring- 
ing all of his horses. In another year there will be 
more stable room and a better track on the grounds 
and the association will probably derive a comforta- 
ble revenue from horsemen for the use of the 
grounds and buildings. 



Kinney H. the yearling colt by Kinney Rose that 
won the colt stake at Woodland last month, is out 
of a mare by Nutwood Wilkes. Kinney H. won the 
first and third heats of this race in 2:50 and 2:51, 
while La Reina, a filly by El Rio Rey, dam by 
Nephew won the second heat in 2:51. These are 
the fastest yearlings that have appealed on the 
Pacific Coast this year. Both are trotters. 



Mr. A. R. Rodman, of Woodland, Cal., advertises 
three good stallions to lease during the stud sea- 
son of 1909. One is a son of McKinney 2:ll 1 / 4, the 
other two grandsons of that great horse, and all 
three are from dams with gilt-edge breeding. They 
are all horses of good size, standing It! hands, and of 
good color. Mr. Rodman desires to lease them to 
reliable persons who will see that they get an op- 
portunity to serve well-bred mares. 



Mr. C. A. Durfee writes that his horses arrived 
at Los Angeles in good shape, like the track and the 
hot sun and that he expects to win all the money 
hung up in 1909. Durfee was always optimistic and 
is given to overlooking the hole in the doughnut even 
though the rim is thin. That's the reason he keeps 
young and enjoys life. When he saw a trotter and 
a pacer each win a heat in 2:11% on Christmas 
Day at the Los Angeles track, while three or four 
thousand people seated in the grand stand cheered 
them, he concluded Los Angeles had not lost its in- 
terest in the light harness horse. 



H. W. Laurence, owner of the stallion Directum 
Penn 2:12%, will turn this son of Directum 2:05% 
over to Will Durfee to train again after a short 
season in the stud. It will be remembered by out- 
readers that Mr. C. L. Jones, of Modesto, purchased 
Directum Penn last year in Kentucky, Mr. Durfee 
lowering his record the first race he drove him. 
Jones then sold the horse to Laurence. Directum 
Penn is not a large horse, but Will Durfee says he 
is a big little horse and one of the most resolute 
he ever drove. Mr. Laurence will breed his mare 
Bonita 2:16 by Knight to Directum Penn this year. 



After nearly sixteen years absence from San 
Francisco Frederick George, journalist, lawyer and 
world trotter, returned to this city from New York 
on Sunday. Mr. George was turf and general writer 
on the San Francisco Chronicle and subsequently 
the Call in the early '90's and was an occasional con- 
tributor of articles to the Breeder and Sportsman 
and other local publications. He has witnessed rac- 
ing, both running and trotting, in many parts of the 
world and followed turf journalism and pursuits 
for upward of 25 years, in America, Canada, England. 
France, New Zealand and Australia. Mr. George 
is also a lawyer by profession, a member of the bar 
of the supreme court of California and intends to 
settle down in San Francisco once again and devote 
himself to the practice of the law, combined with 
journalism. 



SAN FRANCISCO DRIVING CLUB. 

About the most energetic and enthusiastic bunch 
of horsemen that ever got together to race light 
harness horses are the members of the San Fran- 
cisco Driving Club, of which W. J. Kenney is presi- 
dent, Bert Edwards vice president, C. A. Becker, sec- 
retary; Fred Lauterwassen, treasurer, and J. Bonney. 
sergeant-at-arms. The club has gained 36 new mem- 
bers this year and now has 119 active members on 
the roll. The racing given during the past year has 
been the best managed and resulted in the best 
contests in the history of the organization, while 
the records have been lowered for both trotters 
and pacers. 

This club is not in membership with any parent 
organization, but the races are always for money 
prizes, except those held at the track in Golden 
Gate Park and are conducted according to rule. 

During the past year a total of twelve race meet- 
ings have been held at Concord, Vallejo, Tanforau 
and the Park Stadium, while two races were pulled 
off at Emeryville on Butchers' Day. The total amount 
of the purses trotted and paced for at Vallejo, Con 
cord, Tanforan and Emeryville was $6,105. In ad- 
dition to this a meeting was given for the benefit 
of the Robert Smyth fund, which realized $200, and 
many other gifts and bequests were made from 
the club treasury, which at the end of the year will 
contain a balance of between $600 and $700. The 
club has a most energetic official in President Ken- 
ney who is at work for the best interests of the 
club every day in the year, and has done much to 
improve the racing. 

The records held by the club horses were reduced 
this year to very low marks. Walter Wilkes set 
the trotting record at 2:12 and George Perry the 
pacing record at 2:07%. Both records were made 
on the Stadium track against time. 

During the season of 1909 the San Francisco Driv- 
ing Clug will hold many meetings. The officers are 
now in corespondence with the officials of the Stock- 
ton and Sacramento clubs, and arrangements will 
doubtless be made for several joint meetings, as 
both cities can be reached from San Francisco by 
steamer, the cost of transportation thus being greatly 
reduced. Steamers can leave San Francisco for 
either place on Saturday evening, the program be 
raced on Sunday and horses and men return Sun- 
day night to San Francisco. 

The $6,105 distributed in purses by the San Fran- 
cisco Driving Club during the past year has been 
pretty equally divided, the leading money winners 
having between $400 and $500 to their credit. There 
are many good horses owned in the club. 



A GREAT RACE HORSE. 



Something About the Greatest Money Winning 
California Bred Pacer of 1908. 

In the summer of 1907 that master trainer and 
reinsman Will G. Durfee brought to the Salinas track, 
(where the first, meeting of the California circuit 
was held that year) a bay five year old pacing stal- 
lion, stories of whose great speed had preceded 
him, and when on July 27th, the last day of the 
meeting, he came out to contest in the 2:20 class 
pace for a purse of $800, he was watched very closely 
by the horsemen. When the race was over, and he 
had won in straight heats, with the time on the 
board showing 2:10%, 2:08% and 2:09%, the ver- 
dict of the horsemen was that Copa de Oro was 
the highest class pacer California had produced for 
a long time, and this verdict was sustained this 
year when Copa tie Oro made a most wonderful 
campaign on the Grand Circuit, starting in fifteen 
of the fastest and keenest contests of the year and 
being outside the money but once. Of the long list 
of 2:10 pacers bred in California, but three, Bolivar 
2:00%, Anaconda 2:01%, and Coney 2:02 have faster 
records, which fact is sufficient in itself to show 
that Copa de Oro is entitled to a place in the very 
front rank of California bred pacers. In the fif- 
teen races in which Copa de Oro started this year 
he was five times first, five times second, once 
third and three times fourth, and competed against 
such speed marvels as Citation 2:01%, Minor Heir 
1:59%. The Eel 2:02% and many others of the 
most famous and fastest horses of the country. 

In 1907, his first year out Copa de Oro took a 
record of 2:07%, and out of thirteen starts won 
seven races, was second in five, and once outside 
the money. 

Copa de Oro's winnings in 1907 were about $5,000 
while this year he won over $8,000, making a totai 
of over $12,000 in the two years he has been raced. 

One of the remarkable things in connection with 
these two strenuous campaigns made by Copa de 
Oro in which he traveled all over the Pacific Coast 
and the East, meeting the very fastest and best pac- 
ers in training and being sent to the top of his speed 
mile after mile, is that he has come out of it all 
as sound as a bullet with no lameness, bad tendons 
or blemishes, which is evidence that "his bones are 
like steel and his tendons like whipcords." 

In conformation Copa de Oro is one of the best 
proportioned and handsomest horses in California. 
He stands 15.3%, and weighs 1,100 pounds. His 
manners are perfect, he wears no hobbles and very 
few boots, has a perfect racing head in that he can 
be placed anywhere and is always ready to do his 
best, and out of harness is a show horse in any 
company. There is no doubt whatever but he can 
lower his present record, and in a dash against time 
could shade two minutes if prepared for the trial. 

The breeding of Copa de Oro is the very choicest 
as in his veins is the blood of some of the greatest 
founders of speed families that America has pro- 
duced. Of his sire Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% little 
need be said as all breeders know of his attainments 
as a sire. He is the sire of the fastest record trot- 
ting stallion in America today, John A. McKerron 
2:04%, he is also the sire of the dam of the fastest 
pacer on the Pacific Coast this year, Mona Wilkes 
2:03%. He is the paternal grandsire of Hishfly 
2:04%, the second fastest pacer on the Coast this 
year, and of Ella M. R. 2:16%, the fastest two 
year old trotter on this Coast in 1908. These rec- 
ords of the family of Nutwood Wilkes are recent 
and up-to-date, proving him to be one of the great- 
est of living sires. 

On his dam's side Copa de Oro descends from a 
long line of illustrious ancestors. Atherine 2:16%, 
his dam, took her record in a hotly contested race 
of seven heats. She is by Patron 2:14% (son of Pan- 
coast 2:21%) who sired Caspian 2:07%, Ananias 
2:05%, Caracalla 2:10 and the dams of Miss Ab- 
bell 2:06%, Boreazelle 2:09%, etc. Pancoast sired 
the dam of Tommy Britton 2:06%, and Pancoast's 
sire, Woodford Mambrino 2:21%, sired the dams of 
Kremlin 2:07% and Bonnatella 2:10. 

The second dam of Copa de Oro is the great brood- 
mare Athene (dam of two in the list) by Harold, 
sire of Maud S. 2:08%, greatest of race mares, and 
the dams of Beuzetta 2:06%, Ethel's Pride 2:06%. 
Dainty Dolly 2:09%, Early Bird 2:10 and the pacing 
mare Ecstatic 2:01%. 

Minerva, the third dam of Copa de Oro is by Pilot 
Jr. 12. She is the dam of Meander 2:26%, Nug- 
get 2:26% and Egmont, all three of them producing 
sires, the first two both sires of 2:10 performers, 
and the last named sire of the dams of five in 
2:10. Pilot Jr. 12 sired the dams of Maud S. 2:08%. 
Jay Eye See 2:06%, Sclavonic 2:09% and the great 
Nutwood 2:18%, besides other noted performers. 

Copa de Oro's fourth dam is Bacchante Mambrino, 
a daughter of Mambrino Chief II. one of the great- 
est of the early sires, whose blood flows in the 
veins of the majority of the world's champions, 
and his fifth dam Bacchante was by Downings 
Bay Messenger and his sixth dam by Whip Comet. 
A brief glance at the extended pedigree of Copa 
de Oro will show that he carries the blood of Geo. 
Wilkes, Geo. M. Patchen, Nutwood, Patron, Pilot 
Jr.. Williamson's Belmont and other famous speed 
producing sires whose get are famous for endur- 
ance as well as speed. Few stallions have more de- 
veloped ancestors in their pedigrees, and there are 
none who have seen Copa de Oro 2:03% and 
studied his blood lines but believe he will be one 
of California's greatest sires if he is given an op- 
portunity in the stud. He will make the season of 
1909 at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles in charge of 
Mr. W. G. Durfee. 



> 



Saturday, January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



GOOD STOCK AT VICTORIA, B. C. 



Among the stock farms in British Columbia, says a 
Victoria exchange, is one located a few miles from 
Victoria called the Four Mile Farm, owned by Mrs. 
M. Gouge. This lady manages the farm herself and 
conducts it in an up-to-date and business like man- 
ner. She has about a dozen standard bred horses at 
the present time and in the spring will have several 
of them in training on an excellent half mile track 
located on the farm. 

Among the horses that are owned by Mrs. Gouge 
are: Gray Grattan, a handsome dark chestnut stal- 
lion, and a worthy scion of the great Grattan stock. He 
was bred by the Grattan stock farm of Prairie View, 
111., four years ago, being by Grattan with a maik 
of 2:13 from Mazie MacGregor with a mark of 2:28. 
He is head of the farm, and during the time he has 
been owned by the Four Mile ranch he has been 
ujed entirely for breeding purposes and lias never 
been seen on the trac in this city, but it is (he 
uilei.:,on of Mrs. Gouge to enter him in ri'ce.s next 
summer, and if he follows in the footsteps of his 
foreparents he will surprise many. 

Belle Storm, a black mare with a mark of 2:15%, 
is by Storm out of Belle Watts. In 1903 she was 
considered the queen of the British Columbia trot- 
ting mares, and everybody who follows the races 
will remember her sensational career in that year, 
when she started nine times, and after losing the 
first through non-condition, won her next eight, de- 
feating such horses as Helen North 2:09% and Belladi 
2:19. In her race with Belladi she showed her game- 
ness by winning the last three heats, two of them by 
a head in a driving finish. She has now been re- 
tired from active track service, and will in the future 
be used for breeding. Although she has retired from 
the track it is not to prevent her from taking a ribbon 
for brood mares at the Provincial exhibition this 
year. 

Elmo O., a black mare with a mark of 2:15%, 
by Red Baron from Nora by Wildwood, is the latest 
addition to the ranch and it is expected that she 
will show considerable speed during the coming sum- 
mer. She has already been seen on the local track, 
having raced during the summer meeting when she 
won handily. 

Sophie McKinney, a black trotting mare, is a 
direct descendant from the noted McKinney from 
Bessie Wilkes. McKinney mares are considered very 
fine stock and Sophie shows no sign of proving any 
exception. 

Kitty Groce is a handsome bay trotter by Adiron- 
dack out of Belle by Rockwood. Kitty is a half sister 
to Oliver J., the pretty black stallion that won so 
many blue ribbons at the Provincial exhibition in 
Victoria, and also at the Vancouver horse show. She 
has never been tried for speed, but will be given an 
opportunity during the summer. 

Grace Costin was bred on the farm and is a hand- 
some little two year old by King Patchen from Belle 
Storm, and she gives every evidence of following 
the example set by the latter. 

In addition to these Mrs. Gouge has several year- 
lings, which are well bred, besides two splendid 
mares which she uses entirely for driving purposes. 
In fact, the string owned by Mrs. Gouge is one of 
the best in British Columbia, and it will not be long 
before racers bred at the Four Mile farm will be 
taking their places among the best in the country. 

o 

SAN BERNARDINO MATINEE. 



SAN BERNARDINO, Dec. 25 — A large number of 
horse lovers witnessed the matinee races given this 
afternoon at Association Park under the auspices of 
the San Bernardino County Driving Association. The 
card of events was especially attractive and the fea- 
ture results occurred in the free-for-all trot and the 
free-for-all pace, when the local matinee record of 
2:13)4, held by R. Ambush, was broken by Kid 
Wilkes, owned by G. H. Parker, in the free-for-all 
trot, in 2:10%. Delilah, owned by the Davies estate, 
lowered the record still further in the free-for-all 
pace, in 2:09V£. 

The events and results were as follows: 



First event, 2:35 pace: 

Lady Patrick (H. H. Eastwood) 1 1 

Jessie Wilkes (C. Stewart) 2 2 

Time— 2:33 %, 2:30^. 
Second event, 2:35 trot: 

Larry Kenny (Lawrence Rourke) 2 1 1 

Lola Belle (L. Fotton) 3 2 3 

Hi Yu (J. H. Kelley) 1 4 2 

Griff (J. T. Garner) 4 3 5 

Mark Twain (T. W. Wells) 5 5 4 

Time— 2:33, 2:3iy 2 , 2:29. 
Third event, free-for-all trot: 

Kid Wilkes (W. L. Scott) 1 1 

R. Ambush (N. M. Strong) 2 2 

Crellia Jones (H. Rutherford) 3 3 

Time— 2:12V 2 , 2:10%. 
Fourth event, free-for-all pace: 

Delilah (Davis Estate) 1 1 

Mac O. D. (F. A. Ramsey) 2 % 

Time— 2:13, 2:09%. 
Fifth event, 2:25 pace: 

Billie W. (C. C. Stewart) 1 1 

Andrew Carnegie (G. W. Bunnell) 2 3 

Emerald (A. B. Miler) 3 2 

Time— 2:22%, 2:19V 2 . 
Sixth event, 2:25 trot: 

Tom McKinney (Pete Beatty) I 1 

Marie S. (G. W. Bunnell) 2 

Time— 2:36, 2:25. 

o ■ 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



HORSE RACING IN HOLLAND. 

The land erf dairies and windmills is seldom in- 
cluded in the list of those where harness racing is 
held, yet they race there to sulky nevertheless. Joe 
Markey in a very interesting article written by him 
for the Christmas Horse Review, gives the sub- 
stance of a long interview held by him recently with 
Mr. Crommelin, of Heemstede, Holland, who lately 
visited Chicago, and who is described by Mr. Mar- 
key as the most accomplished all-around horseman 
he ever met. 

The following is an extract from the article in 
question: 

There are five race tracks in Holland, located at 
Breda, The Hague, Bussem, Gronigen and Woerldein. 
All are mile tracks and of turf. Racing begins March 
15 and closes November 15, Sunday, Wednesday and 
Friday being the days on which the races are held. 
Nearly all the events are handicaps, excepting the fu- 
turities. They do, however, give occasional heat 
races, two-in-three. The horses move from track to 
track in succeeding weeks and the program at each 
place consists of three trotting and three running 
races daily. The runners are not so popular as are 
the trotters, due largely to the fact that the fanners 
and those who use horses for driving purposes have 
no liking for them. Every trainer must have his 
own track to work on, as the turf course is kept only 
for racing purposes. The daily attendance is about 
4,000, the betting being largely confined to the Paris- 
mutuel machines, although bookmakers are on hand 
at some of the meetings. Purses ranging in value 
from $200 to $25() are customary, but there are a 
number of special events worth $400. The associa- 
tions own and control the betting, and aside from 
the money spent in keeping up the plants, improve- 
ments, etc., the profits are used in buying stallions 
and mares. These are sold to the farmers, some- 
times at a loss in order to interest them in breeding 
a beter class of horses. About $4,000 is spent in this 
way annually. For the most part the stallions that 
are distributed by the associations are French-bred 
trotters, but Mr. Crommelin thinks that once the 
Dutch realize the worth of the American trotter, the 
demand for our horses will be greatly increased. 

FRESNO AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION. 

The regular annual business meeting of the Fresno 
County Agricultural Association was held December 
18th, and the following directors were elected for 
the ensuing year: A. G. Wishon, George L. War- 
low, J. E. Dickinson, H. W. Vogel, D. L. Bachant, A. 
V. Lisenby and John S. Dore. 

The report of the financial condition of the organ- 
ization shows that although it is behind in ready 
money, its assets are in such a condition that in 
reality it is in excellent shape. It was decided at 
the meeting yesterday to sell more stock, particularly 
among the ranchers about the country. L. A. Nares, 
who was present, stated that he would take a large 
block of stock to sell to ranchers in his vicinity. 
The proposition of selling season admission tickets 
for the fair next year, at the present time was taken 
up and thoroughly discussed, but final action was 
left with the boa>'d of directors. 

The grounds owned by the association were re- 
ported to be in excellent shape and the report was 
received with much gratification. 

At the present time 2700 shares of stock have been 
sold and the larger part of the stock was represented 
at the meeting yesterday. The stockholders present 
were: George L. Warlow, .1. E. Dickenson, A. G. Wi- 
shon, D. L. Bachant, A. V. Lisenby, R. A. Powell, 
George W. Beall, Arthur B. Long, H. W. Swift, T. D. 
Prescott, A. B. Evans, Dr. Rowell, M. D. Huffman, 
Dr. Chester Rowell,- A. McNeil, J. A. Poytress, W. 
Wyant, Chris Jorgensen. J. B. Johnson, L. A. Nares 
and T. B. McKelvey. 

o 

ARE YOU WINNING? 



Much depends upon the selection of the equipment 
for a successful training stable and great credit to 
the owners and drivers of such horses as "Allen 
Winter," "The Harvester," and many others, who not 
only so successfully brought out their respective per- 
formers, but who also were able to select the very 
best of equipment for their use. 

The development of the great trotter required a 
great deal of preparation, time and skill, yet the 
fame of the great "Allen Winter" reached every part 
of the harness horse world within a very short time. 
The same is true of the Houghton line of Racing and 
Pleasure vehicles. A great deal of thought, lime and 
skill were required in the development of this won- 
derful product, and although its actual manufacture 
by the Houghton Sulky Company, of Marion. Ohio, 
has only been carried on dining the last four years, 
tho Houghton sulky, cart, speed wagon or carriage 
is known nearly the world over. 

The past year has been the greatest In the history 
of their business, if not the greatest in the history 
of any manufacturer building a similar line of work. 
To build a high class, modern, up-to-date article re- 
quires skill and experience, but to market this article 
at. a moderate and honest price- requires far more 
skill. A complete line of sulkies, matinee, training, 
jogging and break carls, speed, road, golf and beacn 
wagons, special top buggies are illustrated and de- 
scribed in a handsome fifty page catalogue con- 
taining race track scenes, hair raising finishes, 
world s champions, etc., and will be sent, "all 
charges prepaid." to anyone addressing The Hough- 
ton Sulky Company, Marlon, Ohio, 



THE OLD HORSE. 



So it has come to the good-bye, old friend! With 
the best will in the world you can't go a step far- 
ther; you have reached the end of your tether. You 
lie there, spent and patient, waiting for the un- 
known. Thank God, there is no one to interfere 
with your repose, to goad you with rough voice 
and gesture, into making a last frenzied effort of 
work. 

Your latest memories have been those of green 
pastures and pleasant autumn skies; leisured free- 
dom in the open, such as a tired horse loves, un- 
trammeled by saddle, bridle or stall. 

Have you mused with temperate regret on the 
old rousing days when, together we galloped over 
moor and heath and down, while the rush of the 
strong, keen air quickened our blood and went to 
our heads like new wine, and the swift hoof strokes 
echoed in the beating of our hearts? 

Have you pricked your ears in fancy to the sounds 
of the horn and the sight of the busy, eager hounds, 
waiting for the signal to start and away, over field 
and fence, with no thought but to get ahead — all your 
life concentrated like your masters, in the joy of 
fleetness, with youth, and strength and pleasure 
throbbing high in every pulse, and a southerly wind 
blowing in your teeth? 

Then the short, sharp race down the hillside, at the 
finish, and the easy saunter homeward, with the re- 
membrances of a day lived and a fatigue well earned 
to stimulate your flagging vigor toward the welcome 
haven of rest. 

Do you mind the day, old horse, when you landed 
a bit too short on the farther side of the brook, and 
had to scramble out, riderless, though you had the 
grace to turn and wait for your master, who was in 
a worse plight than yourself; but you made up for 
your slip gallantly before the end of the run! Those 
were cherry days! 

Did you wonder when you missed your stable com- 
panions what fate lay in store for you, and whether 
you would follow them to the hammer, and be sold 
for just what you would fetch, with the chance of 
finding yourself between the shafts? Was there 
any room in your philosophy, friend of my best days, 
to speculate on the gratitude of a man to one who 
has served him well, rain or shine? to dread that your 
share in his life would end with his prosperity and 
that dark days for him meant darker days for you? 

Could you picture yourself over-driven, over-bitted, 
with a heavy weight at your back and a heavy hand 
on your rein, threading your way through city streets, 
pulled here and there, with never a straight course, or 
a free mouth, or a will of your own, to give you 
breathing time? 

Or did your understanding of your master's moods, 
never at fault before, guide you to the pre-knowl- 
edge of this restful paddock where twilight might 
deepen into night so peacefully that the transition 
was a tranquil gliding into slumber? 

"It would be kinder to end it at once," says the 
vet, contemplatively "he might suffer at the last 
otherwise. His life will be no more pleasure to him 
now. If it were not the truest kindness, I would 
shoot myself first." 

"A shot is sure enough, but there's an easier way," 
continues the vet, stooping to pick up a straw. His 
reputation for sympathy with animals is as great as 
that of his skill in ministering to their sufferings; 
one can trust him implicitly. "Do you give the word, 
sir?" he asks. A gesture of assent answers him. 

He takes a little sharp penknife from his pocket, 
and stooping quickly over the horse, gently presses 
one of the large neck arteries between his finger and 
lb umb. Then he makes a small incision, and deftly 
slipping one end of the straw into the aperture places 
his mouth to the other and blows down it once. A 
short space of undisturbed serenity and then my 
old friend, who has not changed his attitude of re- 
pose, quivers slightly and lies more still than be- 
fore. 

"There is absolutely no suffering," says the vet., 
stepping back to me. "The instant that bubble of 
air reaches the heart it is over. You can rest as- 
sured that your old friend felt, no pain." 

I shake his hand in gratitude and turn away, while 
through my mind the recollection of some words of 
dear old Adam Lindsay Gordon float idly: 
"We labor today, and we slumber tomorrow, 
Strong horse and bold rider! And who knoweth 
more." 

W. R. GILBERT, in Rider and Driver. 
o 

Whatever has been lacking In keeping up interest In 
automobiles and the automobile industry In general, 
was supplied when the new Studebaker K-M-K "80" 
car. one of the first low-priced vehicles to 

reach (he coast, war, put on the streets for the first 
time. 

The appearance of this new car was also Its Initial 
demonstration. The local agents for the machine, the 
Studebaker Bros.' Company of California, had claimed 
much for their now car and It was with some skep- 
ticism that several competitors In the local Mold kept 
their eyes on the Studebaker Bros.' local representa- 
tives. 

Hut the car proved Itself all (hat lias been claimed 
for it. With John FI. ICagal. manager of the auto- 
mobile department of the local Studebaker concern, 
at the wheel, the machine was given every severe 
test that Is known to the trade, In each Instance 
the oar proving Itself mechanically uuallflo 1 to be 
awarded place In the front ranks with the 1!)09 ma- 
• 111 no.*. 

One of the chief features of the machine Is Its ex- 
ceptional road clearance. The lowest point on the 
car Is the rear axle and this clears the road by 
10% Inches. The fly Wheel, another vital point of a 
oar. clears tin- ground by 1 3 Vfe Inches. One of the 
most pleasing Incidents during the first afternoon's 
test was the manner In which the oar took the steepest 
hills. This fact alone makes the ear specially de- 
sirable for use In San Franclsoo, 



.1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



CASTING UP THE ACCOUNT. 

(Phil Watts in Horseman and Spirit of the Times.) 

When the national holiday season approaches bus- 
iness men make it a custom to take stock of the 
year's business and square matters up into 
a condensed form that will enable them to tell at a 
glance just what have been the outstanding character- 
istics of the business and afford a basis of comparison 
with other seasons. So general has this habit become 
fixed that it is almost impossible to transact some 
kinds of business during this period and many great 
enterprises call in their traveling men and utilize the 
time and the information made available by their in- 
ventories and investigations to prepare a campaign 
for the ensuing year. Nor can the wisdom of this 
sort of general regulation be susceptible of the 
slightest doubt. 

In no line of business can this custom be more prof- 
itably followed than in the horse and general live 
stock business. One of the unfortunate features of 
the stock farm, as a business enterprise, is that there 
is, ordinarily, too little attention paid to what the 
real conditions are. Books are kept and records 
preserved and accounts stated, but, in too many cases, 
in only the most desultory and inaccurate manner 
and it is doubtful if any appreciable number of far- 
mers or horsemen can tell by a reference to their 
records just what is the status of their affairs at 
any given time. 

Naturally a condition so entirely the reverse of that 
obtaining in all large concerns must be a matter for 
wonder and inquiry. There must be some proportion- 
ate cause for there are just as smart and careful 
men in the horse and stock business as in any other 
avocation. And there are some real and tangible 
difficulties that help to account for this condition that 
are quite well worth a brief consideration. For ex- 
ample, let the case of the horseman who is standing 
one or two stallions be made the subject of some re- 
flection. It is most difficult for the stallioner to ever 
tell in what condition is his business no matter what 
particular season of the year might be selected by him 
to take an inventory or try to state his accounts. The 
reason is not far to seek; it is inherent in the very 
nature of his operations. To fully appreciate this ob- 
serve the different methods that prevail in the matter 
of terms upon which stallions are offered for public 
service. These vary with the horses, the locality and 
the owners. Truth to tell, there is no business in 
which the conditions are so unbusiness-like as they 
are in this matter of standing stallions for public 
service. 

Ignoring the thoroughbreds and using the trotting 
horse, and the draft horse by way of illustrations let 
it be said that the terms for service of a high class 
trotting sire are generally "cash at time of service" 
and generally with some sort of return season or re- 
fund of fee in case the breeder gets no colt. There 
are some rare cases where a horse is in such repute 
that he can stand for a fee with "No return." These 
are rare in this country. On the other extreme the 
draft horse owner usually has to wait until the mare 
has been safely delivered of a live colt and the colt 
has "stood and sucked" before the money is consid- 
ered due. In many localities the stallion owner incurs 
an even greater penalty and the foal must live from 
three to ten days and be "straight and all right" be- 
fore the fee is payable. In a wide and long experi- 
ence we have known but few draft stallions that com- 
manded a cash fee. 

Somewhere between these two extremes will be 
found the terms pertaining to all stallions. One sys- 
tem that has some features to commend it is that of 
breeding at an agreed price for "the season with re- 
turn privilege." However, it is not the present pur- 
pose to discuss the merits of any or all plans of breed- 
ing terms or their lack of merit, but rather to show by 
stating them how difficult it is to make an esti- 
mate of what one's profits are likely to be. Probably 
the greatest number of stallions earn their money un- 
der an arrangement whereby the fee is due when the 
mare has foaled a live colt. Suppose one wishes to 
make a statement of his business on January 1st; 
this is practically impossible for the reason that so 
very few mares are bred so as to foal at any other 
time than in the spring, and it is, of course, impos- 
sible to foretell whether the foal will be safely de- 
livered or not But the fact that many mares are 
bred so as to foal in the very late summer or fall 
renders it almost equally impossible to select any 
other satisfactory date. Of course it is possible to 
to take a date arbitrarily selected, in each year and 
state the known facts and probably this would be the 
best way, but the point is that this is seldom done be- 
cause it is hard to find a time that seems to cover 
all the facts. The first of the year is too remote 
from the central point of interest. July first may 
leave one with a considerable number unaccounted 
for and September first will be just prior to the re- 
sults of the fall season usually made by most stallions 
as there are always numbers of patrons whose mares 
foaled them in the spring and they don't want to 
waste a whole year and consequently breed in the 
fall. Thus it is left with a number of objectionable 
features with any date. 

Again there are many stallion owners who offer 
their horses with the understanding that the fee shall 
be payable "when mare is known to be in foal." 
This virtually leaves it until the colt is foaled for de- 
spite all the secret and mysterious signs that wise 
horsemen sometimes evolve out of their experience 
or imagination and which indicate the fact of a mare 
being in foal it is hardly safe to predict any infallible 
theory on this basis. So many mares are deceptive in 
their appearance; one that looks surely to be "heavy 
with foal" develops in the spring to be possessed 



of merely an abnormally developed "hay belly" and 
another so cunningly contrives to conceal her real 
condition that she is passed up as being not in foal 
perhaps even to the time the milk begins to flow from 
her. Obviously, in the face of such facts it is hard 
to adapt a system of bookkeeping. 

Another angle of the same thing reveals an at- 
tempt to take an inventory of the stock on a horse 
farm. Many different schemes have been devised to 
cover this point but none have proved entirely satis- 
factory. Probably this is inherent in the nature of 
things: horses have no value; that is, no determinate 
value; and the same horse is worth ten times as much 
to one man as to another; again a horse may be 
worth a thousand dollars today and not more than a 
hundred to-morrow. The same way, a colt may be 
worth just about two hundred dollars on January first 
and worth ten thousand dollars on July first. There 
is absolutely no such thing as ascertaining what the 
value of a horse is until buyer and seller have met 
and made an agreement. A horse is worth just what 
you can get for it; no more, no less. By way of illus- 
tration, consider a stock farm on which there are be- 
sides, say, two stallions, thirty head of brood mares; 
can any living man even approximately estimate 
their value? It is impossible. Their owner may 
carry them on his books at their actual cost price 
to him. But this may not come within 200 per cent 
of their worth either way. A brood mare inventor- 
ied last January at $700, may have become worth 
thrice that sum this January by virtue of one of her 
produce having won some great race or classic fu- 
turity. Conversely, a high-priced brood mare may 
have been given every opportunity through being 
mated with the best stallions and the training of their 
progeny only to prove a monumental disappointment. 
Out of all the well-nigh countless brood mares we 
have had only a few comparable with such as Beau- 
tiful Bells, Alma Mater, Soprano, Jessie Pepper and 
some others. 

Some men have tried the arbitrary plan of making 
a fixed charge; a yearling is worth $100, a two year 
old $200, etc., but any one can see at a glance that 
this would not only lead to much confusion but also 
be very misleading. The cost of keeping horses is 
not constant but varies with the fluctuations of mar- 
ket prices of land, grain, stock, etc. In the very 
first essay how shall the owner charge up his pas- 
ture account? Is pasture worth one dollar a month or 
three? For how many months of the year? And how 
many horses shall be charged to an acre or how many 
acres allotted to a horse? 

Or if one prefers, as many do, to figure it on the 
legal rate of interest, how shall one discriminate? The 
farm is not for sale; owner would not sell it at even 
an exorbitant price; what then shall be the basis of 
valuation? The purchase price owner paid? Sup- 
pose the farm to have been bought ten years ago for 
one hundred dollars an acre and the state rate of in- 
terest is 7 per cent; it will then be appropriate to 
charge against each acre seven dollars per year and 
if one allows three acres to a horse — which is not 
too many — we have a fixed charge of twenty-one 
dollars for each horse occupying the three acres; 
but here arises the objection that few localities are 
so favored in the matter of climate and other mater- 
ial matters as to enable a horse to live out of doors 
the year round and therefore our horse charge Is mis- 
leading although it may properly credit the farm. But 
there is the other item to be considered; perhaps the 
farm has doubled in value since its purchase; it 
should have increased in value in some degree for 
live stock farming is the only sort that puts more into 
the farm than it takes out. And it is almost as dif- 
ficult to state the value of a farm or of real estate as 
to tell what horse flesh is worth. One farm is worth 
three times what the adjoining will bring although 
potentially both may have an equal intrinsic value as 
farms. 

These are but a few of the many obstacles confront- 
ing the man who desires to have his stock farm prop- 
osition conform to the customs of other business en- 
terprises in being able to state an account and dis- 
close at any moment or at a stated time just, what 
the condtion of the business is. It affords, too, an 
explanation in part of why many of the most sa- 
gacious and astute men, who make great success of 
their other businesses, simply charge up the stock 
farm losses to "pleasure" and let it go at that. 

Therefore the question of how to turn the losses 
into profits becomes something more than merely 
scheming some device to show what the losses are. 
But the first step essential is to discover what is the 
actual condition of the business. One may natur- 
ally suppose that, no matter how rich a man may be, 
the owner of fine horses or a pretentious stock farm 
would prefer to make money with his horses rather 
than lose money. And this being so, the question 
of the method of bookkeeping becomes paramount. 
For when one knows what one's business is doing he 
can profit by those things that show profits to in- 
crease that department and to curtail those places 
where the losses are seen to be in the majority. Ex- 
penses can be cut down if one can discover the leaks 
and enlargement applied to the places that show 
gains. 

No hard and fast rule can be laid down regarding 
any best system of bookkeeping for each person must 
devise his own method to suit his special condi- 
tions. The plan that would work well for the Ohio 
man would not apply to the man in Iowa nor would 
the system that would be entirely suitable for a man 
who had but five or six brood mares be applicable to 
the elaborate stock farm. Nor is the kind of method 
of any particular moment; the thing is to have some 
method that will deliver the answer. 

Two suggestions will naturally occur; one must cur- 
tail the cost and increase the income. It is axiomatic 



to say so but somehow or other those are the points 
that are most frequently missed in the conduct of a 
stock farm. And the other rock upon which most 
profits are wrecked is conducting one's operations 
upon the expectation of some time getting a sensa- 
tional winner that will make up by an extraordinary- 
sale the losses incurred in the regular, usual conduct 
of the business. It is, of course, impossible to sell 
every horse at a profit no matter whether one buys 
or breeds; but on the other hand there is no reason 
why a man, fitted for the business, should not make 
money on the upshot of same with horses as his 
merchandise. There is the point; the effort should 
be to make a reasonable profit on everything one 
produces. This rather than to drift along in a des- 
ultory fashion nursing the hope of a sometime big 
sale. 

Probably steeling one's self against infatuations is 
the most important item in the general resume. There 
is nothing so certain as that it is better to take a 
small first loss than a large last one. When a colt 
shows it is no account, after fair and competent trial, 
shed it, get rid of it. Of course it may prove the 
proverbial rejected stone and you may lose an em- 
bryonic "The Abbot" or two, but in the long run it 
will prove the sure way and the preponderance of 
probabilities are all against the sensational discard 
theory. But the trouble is that so many times 
we permit our preconceived hopes to run away with 
our judgment. We have a fancy for a certain mare 
and indulge hopes of her produce unwarranted en- 
tirely by the actual performances thereof. Never- 
theless we keep on trying and throwing good money 
after bad because we cannot reconcile ourselves to 
the disappointment. Some horses could not be made 
to trot in 2:20 if trained until eternity and the es- 
sential thing is to be able to foresee and recognize 
the improving kind and keep up a constant process 
of weeding out the duffers and disposing of them. 

As a suggestion for keeping records nothing avail- 
able can be better utilized than a minute and accu- 
rate cost account of everything expended for the 
farm account. If one knows the aggregate amount of 
everything purchased and spent and the total num- 
ber of animals on hand a very easy arithmetical di- 
vision gives us the cost to be added to each one. Sep- 
aration into various kinds of expenses gives more de- 
tailed information and this can be extended to any 
point desired. Sales and receipts can be entered 
contra and a fairly accurate statement rendered. But 
anything is a vast improvement over the usual hap- 
hazard plan in vogue and once in process of appli- 
cation grows of its own momentum. 

o 

CAVALRY HORSES. 



Every cavalry horse is numbered. The number of 
the horse is cut into the front of the hoof of the right 
front foot. Similarly located on the left foot is the 
Dumber of the regiment, and the letter of the troop 
to which the horse belongs. Besides these individual 
markings, each horse is branded with the "IT. S." 
with which the federal government marks most of 
its property. But cavalrymen are not mere ma- 
chines, and do not call their horses by number; 
nearly every horse has its name. There is one horse 
in L troop known as "Panhandle Pete," and he has 
the reputation of being the meanest horse in the 
squadron. A few of the best riders can ride him, 
but few of them like to. Sergeant Knapp, who has 
charge of the troop horses, says that when Pan- 
handle joined the command he showed his mean 
streak and the troopers tried to kill him by riding 
him hard and then giving him corn and water. But 
instead of dying the horse was up and kicking, as 
mean as ever, the next morning. The favorite horse 
in the troop is named Peggy, and is a shapely little 
horse, with a long mane and tail. And Peggy is 
a good campaigner. He remains in good condition 
in spite of hard hikes or drills that cut most cavalry- 
horses down. The troop horses know the trumpet 
calls, and as retreat is sounded at night begin to 
make a fuss for their feed. The same thing occurs 
after first call in the morning. Work is one of the 
thinks that isn't a drawback in the army. Lack of 
it may be; but even the cavalrymen, with horses to 
attend to, can do all the real work of the day in an 
hour or two. And, besides answering a few calls, 
they are at liberty the rest of the day. The men 
carry little clothing while in the field and what ex- 
tra garments the Thirteenth has are packed away in 
wagons to be used at St. Joe. But a few popular 
men have overalls which are going the rounds; other 
men borrow the overalls to wear while they wash 
their own trousers. Almost any time in the camp 
you can see some man addressing or writing post- 
cards. That fad seems to have a good hold on the 
army. — Atchison Globe. 

o 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT. 



With the annual meeting of the Grand Circuit 
stewards but a month off, there is considerable specu- 
lation as to the itinerary of the Grand Circuit in 1909. 
That Detroit and Kalamazoo will both be in line with 
big meetings next year is an assured fact, while 
Columbus will undoubtedly again make a bid for a 
two weeks' engagement. Buffalo will probably drop 
out, and if meetings are given at Syracuse, Hartford 
and Boston they will have to be on the betless order. 
Lexington will close with its usual two weeks' meet- 
ing. 

It looks as if the big circuit would lose considerable 
of its patronage to the Great Western Circuit, as 
many meetings there will offer rich stakes and at- 
tractive purses in order to attract Grand Circuit 
stables. 



Saturday, January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

I CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



BATTLE WITH A MONTANA BEAR. 



The narrow escape from death of Dr. C. B. Pen- 
rose of Philadelphia while hunting bear in north- 
western Montana, in company with his two brothers, 
Senator Bois Penrose of Pennsylvania and Spencer 
Penrose of Colorado Springs, is graphically described 
by Arthur Alvord Stiles, typographer for the United 
States geological survey in the United States Geo- 
graphic Magazine, in the Butte Inter-Mountain. Stiles 
was with the party, and it is to his experience, 
strength and endurance that Mr. Penrose owes his 
life. 

Stiles, assisted by Malcom Force of Montclair, N. 
J., and Billy Kemeys of Washington, D. C, his as- 
sistants in the survey party, hewed a path from the 
camp to the railroad through an unknown country, 
and in eleven hours covered the distance which it 
usually took more than two days to travel. Mr. 
Stiles' story follows: 

With the end of the hunting season in the far west 
there comes to light a true and exciting bear story — 
one that well might have made the bravest hunter 
look to his safety, or even have thrilled the sports- 
man spirit of President Roosevelt himself. 

The incident occurred last September in the for- 
est of northwestern Montana. The party consisted 
of Dr. Charles B. Penrose, a well known pnysician 
of Philadelphia, the victim of bruin's ferocious at- 
tack, and his two brothers, Spencer Penrose, of Col- 
orado Springs, and Senator Bois Penrose, of Penn- 
sylvania, now in Washington. The party had spent 
the early part of the season exploring a section of 
the Lewis and Clark forest reserve, where trails were 
to be found and where travel with the pack horses 
was comparatively easy. Toward the end of the 
summer, however, Senator Penrose desired to see a 
part of the country unsurveyed and without trails 
or passways of any kind. It is a section of high and 
rugged mountain peaks, snowfields and living glac- 
iers, wholly uninhabited except by the wild animals 
and well-nigh inaccessible save in the dead of win- 
ter, when some adventurous soul of doubttul judg- 
ment might make his way thither on snowshoes. 

As it happened, a small party of topographical 
surveyors was then penetrating into this God-for- 
saken country, carrying with them their pack-train 
of mules, camp equipment and map-making Instru- 
ments. This was the first pack outfit of any kind 
to enter the territory. Senator Penrose and his 
brothers joined the government party, and by them 
were conducted well up among the snow-capped 
peaks of the range. 

Continued bad weather having stopped the work 
of the surveyors and made all mapping impossible, 
the writer, who was chief of the government party, 
offered to take the Senator out for a hunt. The 
Senator and his younger brother, however, were 
tired out with the long and difficult journey to the 
government camp, so Dr. Penrose, who had endured 
the hard climb better than his brothers, volunteered 
to accompany me to a distant glacier basin, where 
it was expected to find big game. The saddle horses 
were left at the head of this basin, and little know- 
ing of the fate that awaited one of us, we separated. 

I had just sighted a fine buck deer and was on the 
point of creeping away from it so that Dr. Penrose 
might come and kill it, when I heard three shots in 
rapid succession. I gave no special heed to the 
reports, which came from the other side of the ridge, 
and was about turning to shoot the deer myself, 
when I heard two more shots; a moment more and 
another report rang out. Immediately becoming 
alarmed, I ran back in the direction from which 
the shots came. I suppose I reached the doctor in 
about five or ten minutes. As I came around a mass 
of broken boulders I saw Dr. Penrose wandering 
aimlessly about in the canyon bed. He had no gun. 
His hat was gone, his coat torn off and his trousers 
rent. Blood poured from his head and neck, and 
he gripped his left arm in his crimson right hand. 
When I reached him he murmured piteously, "Water, 
water." I ran and brought water in my big sombero 
from the other side of the rocks. He drank it like a 
thirsty horse, and I thought I saw a part of it run 
though a gash in his cheek. Then he said: "Stiles, 
I am all in; I have had a fight with a bear." 

With a pieece of signal cloth I hurriedly began to 
tic up the worst of the wounds, and as I did so the 
picture and the bleeding man told me the story. A 
few rods down the gulch lay a griziy cub, so large 
as to appear full grown, except to the careful ob- 
server. • Near by was the huge carcass of a mother 
grizzly, and near her the doctor's Mauser rifle, cast 
aside and empty. All was plain now. In his excite- 
ment Dr. Penrose had not noted that the bear which 
his first three shots had so promptly slain was yet 
a young cub, whose grief-stricken and enraged 
mother might then be making her way from the 
rocks and brush to avenge the death of her offspring. 
Going down to examine his prize, he placed his rifle 
on a rock, fortunately not far away. 

He was stooping over the dead cub when there 
came from behind him a rush and an awful cry. He 
turned and saw the mother bear coming upon him, 



then not sixty feet away. With almost super-human 
presence of mind, Dr. Penrose caught up his Mauser 
again and fired two shots into the enraged beast. 
Insrantly he took from his pocket his last remaining 
cartridge, worked it into the rifle, and sent a third 
steel jacketed bullet into the onrushing bear. Swift 
and sure as were the little bullets, the bear's fury 
was not checked in time. With one stroke of her 
paw she sent him into the gulch, eight feet below. 
She sprang down after him and caught him in her 
mouth and shook him as a cat might shake a mouse. 
She then dropped him. Again she caught him up, 
his face between her glistening tusks. She tore his 
scalp; his eye narrowly escaped. A tusk penetrated 
into his mouth from the side of his cheek; another 
tore open his throat. There were Ave gaping 
wounds in his chest. His thigh bore an awful irreg- 
ular tear, and the flesh hung in ragged pieces from 
the wound, half as wide as your hand. His left 
wrist was twisted and broken, and the bones stuck 
out through the quivering flesh. The bear tried 
once more to shake off her half-dead victim, but 
she sickened with her own awful wounds, and, stag- 
gering, fell dead at his feet. 

The little Mauser bullets, fired a omment before 
finally had their deadly effect, and by his steady 
nerve and accurate aim Dr. Penrose had saved his 
own life. Had the beast lasted another half minute, 
doctor would have been with his fathers, and the 
little cub's death would have been avenged. But the 
heroic mother had fought to the last, and now, with 
her dead baby, lay quiet and still. 

Recovering sufficiently, the bleeding man sat up 
and began to take stock. As he meditated thus, 
there came a new adversary. In actual fact, or in 
the suffering man's delirious fancy — I have never 
known which — a third bear bounded out of the brush 
from a different direction. The doctor's heart sank; 
he could make no resistance now ; he hoped that 
death might come quickly. The new enemy came to 
close quarters, and, walking around, growled and 
snarled savagely, yet was evidently undecided what 
to do. Then, with a cry of mingled rage and fright, 
it dashed off down the gulch and was lost to sight 
in the forest. 

The journey back to camp was difficult and dan- 
gerous, but the suffering doctor, who now began to 
realize his frightful condition, was bearing up 
bravely. Wrapping my big cowboy slicker around 
him, I managed to get him on my horse, and we 
turned back to the camp, where we had left the 
Penrose party. My faithful horse did his duty 
nobly, as we climbed and stumbled along for two 
hours without hitting a trail, at last reaching the 
tepees at nightfall. The unexpected sight of the 
wounded and bleeding doctor somewhat demoralized 
the group of waiting men, and after some delay a 
little pine knot fire was made for light, and with 
the patient lying at full length on the ground I be- 
gan my surgical operations, assisted by such need- 
ed instruction as the doctor, in awful pain, could 
give me while the work progressed. I applied an- 
tiseptics and placed bandages, all of which he hap- 
pily had with him in a small emergency case. Fi- 
nally the broken wrist was reached. It was agreed 
that I should remove the protruding bones, the 
nervy patient thinking he. could endure the pain of 
the operation without anaesthetics. I disinfected 
the little knives and appliances and the last opera- 
tion began. With one agonized groan the man gave 
up for the first time. We held a hurried conference. 
The wrist, would have to be left as it was, and we 
bound it up once more in signal cloth. It was 
1 o'clock in the morning when I finished my ama- 
teur surgery. Thoroughly distracted by the sight 
of their brother's suffering, Senator Penrose and 
Spencer withdrew to another tent, and I lay down 
near Dr. Penrose to wait for dawn. 

My life on the frontier has been full of trying epi- 
sodes, but, oh, that night! How would we get Dr. 
Penrose out of the mountains? I dare not guess how 
many times I asked myself that question. As the 
gloomy hours dragged by, 1 listened to the heavy 
breathing of the man whose nerve and fortitude I 
had already come to admire, now asleep and groggy 
wilh the morphine injected to stop his unbearable! 
suffering. 

To go back the way we came up would mean two 
days and a GOO-foot climb on foot. He could not last. 
Yet there was no other route. The situation was 
desperate. In the lonely flickering of that campflre 
I meditated, and my sympathies went out to that 
wounded man. As the case presented itself at that 
moment, success in guiding the party to the rail- 
road meant the doctor's life, if not his comfort; 
failure meant death, simply. Before that welcome! 
dawn had come I decided to run a hazard. We would 
take Dr. Penrose to the railroad by an unheard of 
route. Providence might point the way. 

At dawn the little caravan started. Again the big 
black horse carried the almost helpless doctor, Sen- 
ator Penrose and Spencer walking on either side to 
steady their brother through the tight places. Their 
faithful guide. Bill Hague, lead the extra "packs," 
and two young men from the survey party, Malcolm 



Force of .Montclair. .New .Jersey, and Billy Kemeys 
of Washington, D. C, worked as axmen. Thus, for 
eleven hours, we climbed down, down, down, through 
the forest and jungle culling our way as we went. At 
dark we dropped through to the railroad, completely 
exhausted, though safe. Our route had proved suc- 
cessful. I could not have on another tree or bro- 
ken another brush, and my two survey boys had 
stood by me like men. 

Quickly we conducted Dr. Penrose to a lonely sec- 
tion house two miles down the track, where the 
Great Northern Limited was flagged, and he was 
taken away to Minnesota, where, three days later, 
he was operated upon by the surgeons at the Mayo 
hospital. Since then he has retired to his country 
home near Philadelphia. Though his recovery is not 
yet complete his progress has been very remarkable. 

WHERE GAME IS THICK. 



The Santa Rosa Mountains, situated in Mexico, 
about 80 to 100 miles south of Del Rio, Texas, have 
become of late years the favorite hunting ground 
for many American sportsmen. These mountains 
abound in wild game of various kinds. Bears and 
deer are plentiful. Wild turkeys are found in big 
droves along the water courses. Occasionally a Mex- 
ican tiger is encountered, lending to the excitement 
of the sport. Wildcats of enormous size, foxes and 
many kinds of smaller game inhabit the thickets of 
undergrowth, and rocky cliffs that go to make up 
this sportsmen's paradise. It is a region so far re- 
moved from railroads and the ordinary routes of 
travel that it has not been overrun by hunters and 
the game that is killed every year in the several mil- 
lion acres embraced in the mountain range do not 
lessen the supply. The primitive wilds of these 
mountains, with animal life abounding on every 
hand, afford ideal enjoyments for the lover of outdoor 
sport. 

In the fall of the year, when there is a crispness 
in the air of the higher altitudes of the mountains, 
when the wild fruits, such as persimmons and red 
haw, are ripened, the bears and many other varieties 
of game hunt out these feeding spots and linger 
long over the fine repasts that nature has so gener- 
ously provided for them. It is no trick at all for 
a hunter who is acquainted with the habits of bears 
to locate the most likely spots where they are to be 
found and easily get his trophy of a skin or two. 
The black bears in the Santa Rosa Mountains are 
said to be more ferocious than the bears of the same 
species which inhabit the cane brakes of Eastern 
Texas. The Santa Rosa bears have been known 
to put up a desperate fight when wounded. The 
hunter who has a knowledge of their fighting qual- 
ities is careful how he approaches one of the 
wounded animals. It is seldom that packs of bear 
dogs are taken into these mountains and practically 
all of the hunting is done by stalking. 

Congressman Albert S. Burleson, Fred Connerly 
and Joe Byrne, all of Austin, Tex., passed through 
Del Rio recently from a successful hunt in the moun- 
tains of Northern Mexico. They took back with 
them four black bear skins and the antlers of a big 
buck deer which they killed. These men are veteran 
sportsmen who have hunted big game in the various 
parts of the United States and Mexico. They were 
enthusiastic over the splendid time they had on their 
latest expedition. 

On their outgoing trip they made a brief camp at 
the headwaters of the San Diego River, which has 
its source at a great spring that bursts out of the 
rocks at the foothills of the mountains. The waters 
of this river are teeming wilh bass and other gamey 
fish. After enjoying the fishing sport for a brief time 
the hunters placed their camp equipment on the 
backs of their pack horses and continued their jour- 
ney towards the mountains. They traveled 75 miles 
from the first camping spot, making one or two in- 
termediate camps on the way. It was at the first 
"pack" camp after leaving the San Diego River that 
Mr. Burleson killed the first deer of the trip. It was 
of the blacktail variety. It is stated that these black 
tail are found only in the foothills and that the 
whitetail deer inhabit the more rugged mountain re- 
gions. This is contrary to the general belief among 
deer hunters that blacktail deer prefer the moun- 
tains for their range, while the whitetail are found 
only in the lowlands. 

The country between Del Rio and the mountains 
is comparatively barren. Occasional clumps of stunt- 
ed trees relieve; the landscape. When the mountains 
are reached the aspect of the country changes. A 
tanglewood of vines and shrubs cover the sides of 
the canons and draws which cut the range into many 
shapes. In the narrow valleys are trees of enormous 
size. Springs of pure water gush out of the rocks 
and flow through the dark and gloomy depths of the 
mountain gorges. A more typical home for wild game 
would be hard to imagine. 

The Austin hunting party found bear tracks as 
thick as pig tracks in a hog lot. The animals were 
just beginning to fatten on the wild fruit which grew 
so abundantly in the mountains. On the first day 
after permanent camp had been established Mr. 
Byrne killed a big black bear. He was making his 
way along the slope of a mountain when he saw a 
black spot in a little clearing about 75 yards below 
him at an angle of probably 35 degrees. Mr. Byrne 
watched the spot for a moment and then saw it 
move. He concluded that il was a bear, although the 
brush obstructed his view. He fired at the animal. 
At the report of the gun it started to run along the 
slope. It came to another open spot and Mr. Byrne 



io 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



let loose another load. At that instant there was a 
crackling or the bushes about half way down the 
slope, and another big bear came into view. Mr. 
Byrne said that he was so busy trying to make sure 
of killing Lhe Hrsl bear that he let the second one 
disappear wlthoul taking a shot at it. He fired an- 
other shot or two at the first bear and was pleased 
to see the animal turn and take the back trail. This 
action on the part of a bear is said by hunters to 
be a sure sign that the animal is fatally wounded. 

While Mr. Byrne was debating as to what he 
should do next, he saw two deer running along the 
side of the mountain, about 400 yards distant, on 
the opposite side of the canon. They were too far 
off to shoot at. Down in the depths of the canon he 
heard the calls of a drove of wild turkeys. He was in 
a veritable congress of wild game. MMr. Byrne said 
that he debated in his mind for some time whether 
he should venture into the thick underbrush in 
search of the bear which he knew he had wounded, 
or if it would not be best for him to walk the four 
miles to camp and get help. He climbed a tree to 
see if he could not get a view of the wounded animal 
but it could not be seen. Finally he got his nerves 
up to the sticking point and made his way cautious- 
ly through the thick chaparral to the spot where he 
believed the wounded bear had fallen. He parted the 
brush with his rifle and there within a few feet of 
him lay the bear. The animal was dead. 

The Gulf Coast region of Texas is the winter feed- 
ing ground for many milloins of wild ducks and 
geese. The wholesale slaughter of ducks along the 
Texas coast begins at the commencement of the sea- 
son and lasts all through the winter. Hundreds of 
sportsmen visit the localities where the fowls make 
their feeding grounds and kill them until surfeited 
with the sport. Killing wild ducks and geese for the 
market is a thing of the past in Texas. Under the 
law they cannot be shipped or sold. They are con- 
sumed only by the sportsmen who do the killing or 
such friends as they may choose to give them to. 
Before the passage of this law wild ducks were 
killed in the coast country by the thousands by 
professional market hunters and shipped out by car- 
loads. The owners of private duck preserves made 
fortunes out of the sale of the ducks killed upon 
their respective properties. 

Duck shooting in the vicinity of Rockport and 
other coast towns is lazy work. It is comparatively 
inexpensive sport. The inconvenience of "camping 
out" and of wandering around chaparral in search of 
game do not have to be experienced in going 
after ducks. The use of blinds and decoys is not 
even necessary. Good shooting may be had at al- 
most any open spot about the shores of the bays or 
lagoons. Considerable shooting is done in boats, as 
one may move abotu more readily and wounded 
and killed fowls are easily recovered. It is no trouble 
lor two or three sportsmen to get a boatload of 
ducks in a few hours. 

o 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Striped Bass Fishing — Over 100 enthusiastic salt 
water anglers braved the bitterly cold weather last 
Sunday for a try at striped bass round about the 
W'ingo fishing waters. The best catch of the day was 
taken by one boat in which were C. B. Hollywood and 
J. Bliss, Hollywoods three fish scaled 2iy 2 , 16 and 
14 pounds respectively, over 60 pounds of fish in the 
best of condition. This catch is not to be despised 
when one realizes that striped bass are retailing in 
the local markets for 25 cents a pound. Bliss landed 
a fish that weighed 21% pounds. Tim Lynch caught 
a 19 pounder and his companions landed two more 
fish. Jas. Lynch is credited with an 18 pound bass. 
A party of Oakland fishermen in a large launch also 
captured a few large fish, weight and number, how- 
ever, were not ascertained. The clam-tossers who 
fished from boats were the most successful as they 
were able to get on the deeper side of the sloughs. 
The fishers on the bank could not get out to where 
the big fish evidently were. 

All the fish taken last Sunday were caught on the 
last half of the run out or last of the flood tide. 

That there are some very large fish in the W'ingo 
waters is patent in the fact that several strikes 
were had from heavy fish that after a brief fight 
easily broke away. When a bass can break off the 
barb of a No. 9 O Shaughnessy hook it must be a 
lusty fish. 



Steelhead Angling — Reports from Duncans Mills 
state that the bar is open and the river in fine con- 
dition for fishing. Anglers have taken from two to 
five fine fish daily for a week past. 

Every pool from the mouth of Russian river as far 
up as Moscow cottage is reported to be alive with 
fish running from 6 to 20 pounds. 

The river is low and clear and there is a run 
of "fresh" fish on each tide. Many local anglers 
are taking advantage of the present fine weather 
and as there is a full complement of boats avail- 
able the sport promises to be at its best for the sea- 
son. Dr. J. Auburn Wiburn with Mrs. Wiburn and 
her sister enjoyed the fun last Sunday. 

At Point Reyes a few small steelhead were caught 
in the "white house" pool last Sunday. 



Black Brant — Last week Al Wilson and two friends 
had a shoot on black brant in Tomales bay when the 
total bag counted up 90 birds. There is only three 
or four spots on the California Coast where these 
delicious geese can be shot and the Tomales bay 
resort is about the best. 



Duck Hunting — The cold and stormy weather dur- 
ing the past week has given the duck hunters a de- 
gree of sport with about the best results since the 
season opened. Canvasbacks were plentiful and 
limits were bagged at many resorts. One limit on 
cans" was shot down at the "bridges" near the 
mouth of Coyote creek. 

One of the best shots reported was enjoyed by John 
Lemmer and Ned Bosqui, who each returned from 
Salmon creek, near Bodega bay. with limits on 
both ducks and quail. 

Mr. Wm. Lanz, a prominent sportsman of Hono^ilu. 
H. T. was recently the guest of Jas. Maynard at the 
Volante Gun Club preserve on Joyce Island, Mr. 
Lanz enjoyed a fine shoot in one of the club blinds 
and accounted for a limit bag of sprig, widgeon, teal 
and several fat canvasbacks. 

— o 

Game Law Changes Advocated — That the coming 
session of the legislature will have many bills sub- 
mitted providing for changes in the present game 
laws is a foregone conclusion. What the ultimate 
results will be is a problem, for there is a decided 
difference in texture of demand from various sec- 
lions. What is desirable in one hunting or fishing 
country is objectionable to the sportsmen of another. 
As an indication of what some Southern California 
sportsmen want we quote the Riverside Press of De- 
cember 19th as follows: 

"An enthusiastic meeting of the Riverside County 
Game and Fish Protective Association was held last 
evening. President Correll spoke of the meeting he 
and Secretary Logan had with the Southern Caliofr- 
nia senators and assemblymen who were here last 
week. This body of law makers seemed in hearty 
accord with the good work of the Association and 
promised to do all they could for the preservation of 
game in this end of the State. At the next session of 
the legislature the State will likely be divided into 
two game districts, one south and one north of the 
Tehachapi. The members present last evening 
heartily endorsed the work of the committee who 
waited on the legislators, and the local association 
is the first one to go on record for the cutting of 
the bag limit and shortening the season in doves, 
quail and deer. They ask: 

1. Close the season for deer for three or five 
years. 

2. Make the open season for doves from August 
1st to October 1st; bag limit, fifteen in one day. 

3. Make the open season for quail from October 
15th to January 15, bag limit, fifteen in one day. 

4. Make open season for ducks from September 
1st to March 15th, bag limit, twenty-five in one day. 

This is reasonable both for open season and for 
bag limit, as shown by laws of other states, and with- 
out good laws and their vigorous enforcement, not 
more than three more years will be required to ex- 
terminate deer, doves and quail in Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

A vigorous campaign for new members will be in- 
augurated during the next month. It is hoped that 
every one who has taken out a hunting license will 
become a member. Quail are getting scarce and it 
is desired to raise a sufficient fund to trap several 
hundred birds on the desert, where they are a nuis- 
ance to the melon and grape growers, and transplant 
them to the country between Corona and Perris, three 
or four miles south of Riverside. 

The matter of protecting song and other beneficial 
birds was discussed and it was the desire of all pres- 
ent to co-operate with the local Audubon Society and 
assist in the passage of such laws as will save these 
feathered pets from being slaughtered by ruthless 
.gunners." 



Wild Turkeys — A report from San Bernardino last 
week conveys the following interesting information 
regarding the progress of Mr. Van Slyke s trip to 
Mexico after wild turkeys: 

"Word has just been received from W'.E. Van Slyke 
of this city, deputy commisisoner appointed to secure 
the birds, that he is now in the heart of the wild 
turkey country, in the jungles of Old Mexico, and has 
a score of Indians to assist him trapping the big 
birds. Splendid results have already been attained. 

Van Slyke went from San Pedro to Mazatlan. 
thence by stage to Rosario where he outfitted. Then 
he pierced the jungle country of the Teplc terri- 
tory, in the western section of Mexico. The long 
journey was accomplished on mules. He writes that 
he is in the roughest country imagineable, that 
there's nothing like it in California, or for that mat- 
ter, in any other part of the Mexican republic. 

The Indians are most primitive. Like children 
they take a fancy to bright-colored toys, cloths and 
rings. He has won their confidence, and for two 
months they have now been aiding him in trapping 
turkeys. He says the country abounds with these 
big birds, and he has struck the territory in the 
right season for their capture. 

The letter just received was written forty days 
ago. It takes all that time to reach civilization. Van 
Slyke said that he at that time was getting ready a 
big consignment of birds which would be shipped 
from Mazatlan in January. It is likely they will be 
sent direct to the State game farm at Haywards. and 
from there distributed at the proper season. The 
consignment will be but one of numerous shipments 
to be made before Deputy Commissioner Van 
Slyke returns to California. 



Sparrow Hawks Deplete Quail Supply — The State 
Commission offers a bounty for the destruction of 
mountain lions in this State with the object of in- 
creasing the supply of and protecting the deer. For 
each lion or cougar that is put out of business the 



lives of fifty deer are saved each year, it is esti- 
mated. 

But our small game, the greatest and grandest of 
w hich is the valley quail that affords sport in its pur- 
suit to thousands of shooters during lhe hunting sea- 
son, remains unprotected from its greatest enemy, 
viz: the sparrow hawk. This bird of prey can be 
seen at all months of the year lurking in the Imme- 
diate vicinity of the quail's habitat, and its numbers 
have increased to such an extent in late years that 
unless some drastic measures are taken by sports- 
men, with the assistance of the Commission, to de- 
crease the family of quail killing hawks, it is only a 
matter of a few years when our grand little upland 
bird will become exceedingly scarce. 

Why not the Fish Commission use part of its game 
license fund and offer inducements in the way of 
bounties for the heads of sparrow hawks and blue 
jays? It could not expend the moneys of the fund 
in any way to a better advantage comparatively. 

Our sportsmen are strongly in favor of ridding the 
country of any and all predatory birds and animals 
that are destructive to game, and as it is their good dol- 
lars that are handled by the Fish Commission one 
would be inclined to the belief that the Commission- 
ers would, at least, give the desire of thousands of 
the game license taxpayers the attention to which it 
is entitled in this respect. 

o 

PROTECTION OF GAME IMPROVES SPORT. 

The fruits of systematic and intelligent game pro- 
tection are more apparent this season than at any- 
time since the initial steps were taken for the con- 
servation of game resources, and as a result the out- 
look in every branch of hunting is vastly more aus- 
picious than five years ago. 

It was only a few seasons ago that the quail seemed 
in danger of extermination, and local sportsmen pre- 
dicted that it was only a matter of a year or so before 
the bird supply would be completely depleted. Duck 
shooting held up fairly well, but even this condition 
was attributed largely to the duck clubs, which are 
accredited as being the greatest protective agent that 
has ever been exerted in behalf of the birds. 

The bag limit was then in excess of the present 
legal number, and thousands of birds were shot 
where hundreds are bagged today. Still the club gun- 
ners engaged in their shooting but two days in the 
week, leaving five days when the birds were undis- 
turbed. Furthermore the clubs encouraged the pres- 
ence of fowl by creating fresh water ponds and pro- 
viding natural and artificial food. 

Then the market hunters bagged from 300 to 400 
birds a day and shipped the game to the city com- 
mission houses, but this avenue of destruction has 
been practically closed by the gradual invasion of 
the private club until at present the private pre 
serve covers almost exclusively the entire available 
duck land In Southern California. This year the 
flights in many hunting sections are exceedingly nu- 
merous, and since the last storm the sportsmen have 
enjoyed the finest kind of shooting. 

The more flagrant violators of the limit law today- 
are operating in the San Joaquin Valley, where there 
are many hunters who utterly disregard the limit, and 
who are making shameful inroads on the game sup- 
ply, not altogether for purposes of private gain, but 
many for the pure satisfaction of killing a large num- 
ber of birds. 

The only good marsh land where the unattached 
hunter can get the limit in the south for instance, is 
in portions of San Diego county, near Santa Margher- 
ita, -and in the Imeprial Valley section. Here, how- 
ever the sport is not what it formerly was, and the 
market shots often find the long journey unproductive 
of the desired results. Round about San Francisco 
and the bay counties marshes, as well as the open 
water resorts, there is still quite a bit of open shoot- 
ing ground. 

Similar protection for quail by the organization of 
private clubs for the purpose of the control of pre- 
serves is gradually coming to pass. The Southern 
sportsmen are beginning to follow the example of the 
Northern hunters, where the birds' conditions are far 
in advance of the Southern California provisions, al- 
though the Southern sportsmen on the other hand 
are admittedly better equipped In the protection of 
ducks. 

In many parts of the northern section of the State 
the sportsmen have leased vast tracts of land in 
which the birds may roam undisturbed during the 
closed season under the watchful eye of wardens, 
and only club members are allowed io shoot, on the 
grounds who rigidly observe the limit. 

The brand of quail shooting has thus been elevated 
until it compares favorably with the Eastern sport. 
The birds remain In reasonably level country, not 
too densely brushed, and afford a dog a good chance 
to show his worth, which would be Imposible where 
one is freely ranging the country every day in the 
week and driving the quail into the inaccessible hills. 

In this spirit a few preserves have been set aside- 
by Southern sportsmen, and the result is already ap- 
parent In the number of birds at hand. The over- 
flow of birds from the liberal breeding made possi- 
ble on the protected grounds, tends to restock the 
surrounding country thereby helping the sport frr the 
vast army of unattached hunters. 

The most notable example of the possibility of bet- 
ter sport is found in the shooting on the De Lux pre- 
serve, a club organized by John Hauerwass of Los An- 
geles several years ago and now membered by Gen. 
C. F. A. Last, Fred Holbrook. August WIntsel. Jacob 
Adloff and Aug. Marquis. The preserve Is located 
in the hills near Enclnltas. and a comfortable club 
house gives the members proper housing. The coun- 
try is rolling and dogs can be used to advantage, thus 
making a double pleasure out of the hunting. 



» 



Saturday, January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 



PACIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 



The American Kennel Gazette for December 15th 
is at hand and among other proceedings of the pub- 
lished meeting of the A. K. C. in New York November 
30th we find the minutes of a meeting of the Pacific 
Advisory Committee held October 17th which is given 
below. As things go Coast fanciers may congratulate 
themselves that the official acts of the Coast Com- 
mittee are available in two months instead of six. 

Present: H. H. Carlton, Dr. W. P. Hurnham, W. 
W. Stettheimer, J. P. Norman. Absent: C. K. Harley. 

On motion Mr. Carlton took the chair. 

On motion the minutes of the previous meeting 
were accepted as published in the Gazette. 

It was moved and seconded that the rules be sus- 
pended, in order to dispose of pending protests and 
appeals. Carried. 

In the case of Stettheimer vs. Venice of America 
Kennel Club: An appeal from decision of a bench 
show committee. 

Appellant filed an affidavit stating that his fox ter- 
rier dog, Tallac Marlin had been entered in the Ve- 
nice show, had won special prize for best of any 
breed in the show, but had failed to compete for best 
Pacific Coast bred dog, by reason of the neglect of 
the show-giving club to see that his dog was brought 
into the ring for competition. The dog was evi- 
dently eligible to compete, as Appellant's entry 
blank stated that the owner was breeder, and that 
his residence was at Redwood City, California. Ap- 
pellant appeared in person. 

Respondent was not represented. 

Respondent filed answer to the effect that the club 
was not responsible for the failure of Appellant's 
dog to compete, inasmuch as it was impossible for 
a club to determine which dogs were eligible for 
specials and moreover that it was no part of the 
duty of a club to look out for dogs for anything but 
regular classes. 

It was moved and seconded, that whereas the Ve- 
nice of America Kennel Club advertised in its prem- 
ium list, that when exhibitors were not present, 
their dogs would be taken into the ring for competi- 
tion by attendants, and whereas Appellant's entry 
blank showed clearly that Tallac Marlin must be a 
Pacific Coast bred dog, and therefore eligible to com- 
pete tor the trophy offered for such, and whereas 
said Tallac Marlin had won the special for best of 
any breed in the show and would necessarily have 
won the aforesaid trophy if allowed to compete for 
the same and had the Respondent exercised due care 
to take him into the ring, as advertised in their prem- 
ium list: 

Therefore be it Resolved, that the appeal be and is 
sustained, and that Appellant's dog is entitled to the 
trophy offered for best Pacific Coast bred dog and 
that the Venice of America Kennel Club be and here- 
by is ordered to deliver said trophy to Appellant, and 
to return to him his deposit of $5.00 within thirty 
days from date hereof, under penalty of suspension. 

Dennis vs. Ladies' Kennel Association of California: 
An appeal from decisions of Bench Show Committee. 

W. H. Dennis represented by Mrs. W. H. Dennis. 

L. K. A. of California, represented by Mrs. H. P. 
Rosenberg for the President, Mrs. J. A. Wiborn and 
by Dr. L. W. Spriggs for the Secretary, Mrs. G. A. 
Spriggs. 

Appellant filed affidavit by Mrs. W. H. Dennis and 
Mrs. J. W. Mathews. 

Respondent filed no affidavit and no written de- 
fense. 

Appellant appealed from decision of Bench Show 
Committee, on protest based on statement that Appel- 
lant's black cocker spaniel bitch, Twinkle II., had 
been beaten for first winners, and for special prizes, 
by bitch, Cressella Nancy, owned by A. L. Creswell, 
which bitch had been entered at the Oakland show 
of the L. K. A. of California, after the official date 
of closing of entries. 

After hearing the affidavits presented by Appellant, 
and the oral testimony offered by Respondent and 
a witness, 

It was Moved and Seconded, that Wheareas it was 
proven by the testimony given by the Respondent 
Club's representative, that tne entry of Cressella 
Nancy was not completed until after the date of 
closing of entries. 

Therefore be it Resolved that this appeal be and 
is sustained, and that all awards given to said Cres- 
sella Nancy be and hereby are cancelled and all 
prizes forfeited, and that the award of first in Win 
ners Class, bitches, Black Cocker Spaniels and the 
trophy for best Black Cocker bitch and the Califor- 
nia Cocker Club trophy for best Black Cocker Span- 
iel of opposite sex be made and passed to the reserve 
bitch, Appellant's Twinkle II, and that the Ladies' 
Kennel Association of California be and hereby is 
ordered to deliver to Appellant all said trophies and 
to return to him his deposit of $5.00 within thirl y 
days from date hereof, and to pay to the American 
Kennel Club a fine of $5.00 in respect to the entry 
of Cressella Nancy aforesaid. 

On motion the meeting was adjourned, subject 
to the call of the chair. 

(Attest:) J. P. NORMAN, 

Secretary. 

o 

Wild Geese — Hanford sportsmen are having great 
sport shooting wild geese in the vicinity of Tulare 
Lake. Last week Geo. Ross, Wm. Brooks, Thos. 
Smalley and Lew Alexander spent a few days goose 
hunting west of the lake, camping about three miles 
east of the Old Adobe. They secured a wagon load 
of game, but found the fog so thick near the lake 
that a wild goose would nearly hit their hats before 
they could see it. 



THE BREEDERS' CUP. 

In reference to Tevis Breeder's Cup matter re- 
ferred to us to determine, we beg to report that in 
view of the fact that the original deed of gift was 
destroyed in the San Francisco fire, a decision cai» 
only be reached through the wording of the Bpecial 
as published for the first time In :'ne San Francisco 
dog show catalogue of 1902 which reads as follows: 

Dr. H. L. Tevis offers a silver cup to be known as 
"The Breeders' Cup," for the best Pacific Coast bred 
bull terrier whelped in the year previous to compe- 
tition (1901). To be won three times under the con- 
dition of deed before becoming the absolute propertj 
of one exhibitor. 

If is the sense of this Committee that the conditions 
of a deed of gift for any special prize cannot be 
changed after the conditions of same have been pub- 
lished in premium list or catalogue, therefore we de- 
cide that the cup has been won as follows: 

At the 1902 show by J. C. Bone, breeder and exhib- 
itor, of the bitch Hawthorn Snowflake. 

At the 1904 show by Ed. Attridge, breeder and ex- 
hibitor of the dog Edgecote Peer. 

At the 1903, 1905, and 1907 shows, the exhibitors 
to whom the awards were given were not the breeders 
and therefore the awards are not in accordance with 
our conception of a "Breeders' Cup." 

G. MUSS-ARNOLT, 
DWIGHT MOORE, 
A. P. VREDENBURG 1 1 . 



MEXICO SHOW 

The first semi-annual bench show of the Mexico 
Kennel Club took place Friday, Saturday and Sun- 
day, December 18th to 20th. Friday was Mexico day, 
Saturday "American Day" and Sunday "British Day." 

All Mexico went to the dogs the opening day, 
Friday afternoon and night, when the show of the 
Mexican Kennel club opened at the Tivoli de Eliseo. 
Governor Landa y Escandon, honorary president of 
the club, declared the show formally opened shortly 
after 3 o'clock. The popular executive delivered a 
short, but happy address, in which he explained the 
importance of the work the kennel club is doing for 
the good of improving the class of high bred canines 
in the republic. The governor, in company with his 
suite, arrived at the Tivoli about 3 o'clock and was re- 
ceived by a committee of the club, composed of the 
Hon. Reginald Thomas Tower, the British minister, 
A. W. Donley, the Canadian commercial representa- 
tive to Mexico; Joseph Ketchum, president of the 
club; Col. J. Sanderson, the secretary and George 
Miller, vice president of the Mexico Kennel club. 

"Nearly 100 blue-blooded aristocrats of the canine 
world barked their welcome to the many notables 
who atended the opening day of the show," writes 
a correspondent. "A wide variety of classes were on 
exhibition, and it was a question in the general mind 
which was the most popular breed on exhibition. 
Minister Tower's Tycho Brahe, an English bulldog, 
who is so absolutely ugly that he is fascinatingly 
attracted much attention, while Mrs. A. E. Wors- 
wick's Colonia Donald, winner of the first prize in the 
collie class in last year's show, again received homage 
almost royal. 

Governor Landa y Escandon has several fine hounds 
on exhibition, while a group of fox terrier puppies 
playful and happy, caught the fancy of the crowd. 
Several winners of prizes in the last show are again 
on the bench and from the diffident manner in 
which they receive the petting of the spectators it is 
evident that they realize that they are the class." 

The following gentlemen acted as judges in the 
different classes: Sporting dogs, William Hrockway; 
fox terriers, Ottway Norwood; Airedale and other 
terriers, L. W. C. Rhode; collies, Fred Woodcock: 
bull terriers, Col. E. Eli Goddard: collies and mis- 
cellaneous, Harry Rhoades. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



A Good Airedale — Among the few Airedales we 
have seen on the California circuit is Ch. Motor Dace, 
a very good specimen of the breed owned by Nat 
Messer. Dace was turned over to Hob Long this 
summer for an outing. Hob likes a good dog and 
knows how to train and handle a pointer or setter. 
He is a thorough sportsman and being located in a 
mining district some sixty miles northeast ot Ha 
kersfield is happily situated to indulge his penchant 
for sports afield with gun and dog. 

When Dace made his debut in the fool hills of 
Kern county he was nothing but a good looking city 

dog, he was, so to speak, greener than the herbage 

environments of his new home — cows, chickens, goats 
and all the denizens of the wildwood were unknown 
and untried quantities. His sterling merits, however, 
were latent, all that was necessary was the proper 
occasion to bring them into action. 

Dace soon won his way into the good graces 
of Long and everybody else about, his new quarters. 
Long soon found out that there was grand material 
in the dog that only needed developing to make him 
come to the front. Dace's first showdown took place 
one morning with a badge]-. Hong was out with a 
game little son of Norfolk Truman, a wire haired 



fox terrier called Mush. Mush alter a while routed 
out and tackled a prowling badger. The "brock" 
was a bit too much Cor Mush who had all he could do, 
willing as he was, to hold his And at bay. Dace soon 
found out what was going on and hinted in in a 
matter of fact way, just nosed the "brock" a bit. 
These advances of the Airedale were resented by 
the badger which finally gave Dace a wicked nip 
on the leg. Dace was, for the fraction of a second a 
painfully surprised dog, but quick as a Hash his dor- 
mant gameness and fighting instinct asserted itself 
and the mix up that followed was short and decisive, 
the badger got a savage mauling and was killed 
in jig-time. This was Dace's first tourney afield, 
it seemed to change his whole nature. Previously 
he had been just a good-natured, docile, big terrier, 
the worst he ever did was to scrap with a town 
dog. Now, it seemed as if the slumbering combative- 
ness and working intelligence of his ancestors were 
unloosed and surged through him in almost torren- 
tial force. He was an eager and apt enthusiast, he de- 
veloped so quickly that he could hardly be called 
a pupil. It took him but a short time to understand 
the ways of bobcats, coyotes, mountain lions and 
other vermin of that section and now Long claims 
he is a grand workman, one of the best he has ever 
taken out with him and improving all the time. 

One morning, early this month, Hob took the dogs 
out after bobcats. While he was following up the 
footprints in the snow of a big cat, a coyote was 
routed out by Mush from a clump of brush, some 
thirty feet away. Dace overhauled the coyote in 
a few bounds, this in itself is a clever thing to do, 
for canis latrans has the hotfoot over most all dogs 
but a greyhound. The coyote did not get a chance 
to turn at bay, for Dace had him by the neck and 
with one crunch of his jaws the coyote was killed-. 
Long declares he heard the coyote's neck crack 
when Dace put the pinch on. To anyone who is fa- 
miliar with coyote hunting the significance of this 
gladiatorial feat is apparent. A full grown coyote is 
as large as the average Airedale we have here at 
present, larger if anything, and they give battle in a 
punishing style that will rout anything bat a game 
and intelligent dog. This coyote never had a 
chance. 



New York Judges — The following gentlemen have 
been invited to judge at the coming Westminister 
Kennel Club show: 

Mr. John Black, Harrisburg, Pa., collies. 

Mr. Simon C. Bradley, Fairfield, Conn., pointers 
and all field trial classes except beagles. 

Mr. William Codman, Providence, R. [., bulldogs. 

Mr. Oscar W. Donner, Mamaroneck, N. Y., Irish 
terriers. 

Mr. S. F. deFabry, Little Silver, N. .1., Great Danes. 
Mr. Clair Foster, Douglaston, L. I., bull terriers. 
Mr. Samuel R. Foster, Philadelphia, Pa., Boston 
terriers. 

Mr. Joseph Graefle, Westfield, N. J., dachshundes. 

Dr. James E. Hair, Bridgeport, Conn., Chesapeake 
Bay dogs, English setters, Gordon setters and Irish 
setters. 

Dr. E. Lester Jones, Culpepper, Va., beagles. 
Mr. Edward L. Kraus, Slatington, Pa., Russian 
wolfhounds. 

Rev. T. Moore Smith, Plainfield, N. J., cocker 
spaniels. 

Mr. Harry W. Lacey, Wakefield, Mass., bloodhounds. 
St. Bernards, Newfoundlands, Irish wolfhounds, 
deerhounds, greyhounds, Esquimaux dogs, retrievers. 
Irish water spaniels, Clumber spaniels, field spaniels, 
and whippets. 



The Kennel Editor is in receipt of inquiries for 
Airedale puppies and requests the address and par 
ticulars from breeders and fanciers having young 
stock for sale. 



The following kennel names have been allowed bv 
the A. K. C: 

Trebora — Robert A. Roos, San Francisco. 
Live Oak— O. J. Albee, St. Lawrence, Cal. 



Tacoma fanciers are looking ahead enthusiastically 
to promoting a bench show next spring. The local 
kennel club has decided to permit lady fanciers to 
become associate members. 



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DUCK and 1 
QUAIL LOADS \ 

Selby Shells. All loads in Black and in 
Bulk and Dense Smokeless Powders, 
g Decoys, Duckstraps, Calls. 

£ DUXBAK WATERPROOF 
HUNTING CLOTHING 

Comfortable in all weathers. p 




raoottpovjero 



SAN FRANCISCO, Market and Mason, Polk and > 
Sutter. £ 

OAKLAND, Hrondwny between Nth and 0th. / 



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12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



THE FARM 

ERADICATION OF SCABIES OF 
SHEEP AND CATTLE. 



In a paper presented before the 
recent meting of the American Vet- 
erinary Medical Association at Phila- 
delphia, Dr. R. A. Ramsey, associate 
chief of the inspection division of the 
bureau of animal industry, gave 
some interesting information concern- 
ing the bureau's work for the control 
and eradication of scabies of sheep 
and cattle in the Western States. To 
show the magnitude of this work 
Dr. Ramsey stated that during the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1908, 
bureau employees supervised 17,589,- 
578 dippings of sheep and 1.523,290 
dipping of cattle. 

He explained the methods by 
which the bureau works in co-opera- 
tion with state authorities. This co- 
operation is necessary in order to 
do effective work, as the state offi- 
cials are unable to control the inter- 
state movement of live stock, wniie 
the federal officials alone cannot com- 
pel the dipping of animals remaining 
within a state. The usual plan of 
the work with regard to sheep scab 
is for the bureau to detail inspectors 
to a state to inspect all sheep by 
counties or districts, whether on the 
range or in feed lots. Reports are 
made: as to their condition, whether 
free, exposed or infected with 
scabies, and the names and addresses 
of owners are given. From this data 
an estimate is made of the per cent 
of infection and exposure to disease 
careful inspection. If there is a state 
When quite general infection is 
shown by the reports of inspection 
the conditions arc presented to -he 
governor or the live stock sunilaiy 
officials representing him, who are 
generally pleased to know just what 
the conditions are as the result of 
careful inspection, f there is a stale 
law on which a governor's proclama- 
tion or state regulation can be 
issued requiring that all sheafi in- 
fected with or exposed to scabies 
must be dipped according to the 
plans and under the supervision of 
the bureau of animal industry, such 
action is taken. Men in the employ 
of the state enforce the state older 
and see that all sheep are brought 
to the place of dipping. 

It has been found that wlta two 
or three years of bureau cooperation 
with a state will completely eradi- 
cate the disease from the staiD. Of 
the seventeen states and territories 
west of the Missouri River formerly 
under federal quarantine for sheep 
scab five have been released within 
the past year, and in all probability 
three more states and one territory 
will be released within the next year. 
Active work and general dipping of 
infected and exposed sheep is being 
carried on vigorously in all the states 
under quarantine, so that it now 
seems that in three or four years 
mere generalized sheep scab In the 
western states will be a matter vl 
history rather than of actual ex'st- 
ence. 

The plan of having bureau em- 
ployes inspect cattle in feed lots, pas- 
tures or on the open range at the 
time the spring round-up is made is 
even more satisfactory than in the 
case of sheep. This work is done dur- 
ing the winter and spring when the 
disease is more easily discerned than 
during the summer. The advantage 
of a range inspection during the cool- 
er months was very clearly demon- 
strated in a certain locality iii Texas 
where during 1907 an inspection of 
the cattle at the time of shipping 
and during the summer months 
showed only 5.04 per cent of infection, 
while a range inspection the same 
year showed 64 per cent of the herds 
infected. Whether this condition was 
altogether due to the mites not being 
active during the hot weather, or 
whether the owners were active in 
selecting only the animals now show- 
ing the disease and presenting them 
for inspection at time of shipment, 
is a question; probably both had a 
bearing. 

The great difficulty in eradicating 
cattle scab as compared with sheep 
scab, especially on the open range, 



per cent of the cattle on the range 
can be rounded up for dipping or 
any other purpose at one time, while 
sheep being herded in bands practi- 
cally all of them can be collected and 
09 UBtn worn iou iBq} iobj aqi si 
brought to the dipping vats. This 
condition alone renders the cattle 
work much more tedious and doubt- 
ful than sheep scab eradication. An- 



Two Standard Bred Stallions FOR SALE. 

Ono by ChnrlcM Derby, six years old, 
has paced miles in 2:12%. first-class 
individual, thoroughly broken, kind 
to drive. 

One by MrKinney, weighs 1250 
pounds, high-class and handsome ani- 
mal in every respect. 

The dams of both of the above horses 
are registered for three generations 
back and are producers of speed. These 
two stallions are not only highly bred, 
hut desirable animals in every respect. 
Will be sold cheap. For full particulars 
as to breeding, etc., address A. G. 
SHIPPEE, 247 W. Fremont St., Stock- 
ton, Cal. 



three: stallions to lease. 

One son and two grandsons of McKin- 
ney 2:11%, all out of gilt-edge dams. 
These stallions are all 16 hands, of good 
color, and each has fine large colts to 
show. They will be leased for the 
stud season of 1909 on liberal terms, but 
lessees will be required to give satis- 
factory security. For terms and pedi- 
grees, address 

A. B. RODMAN. Owner, 
Woodland, California. 



DICTATUS 2:17 TO LEASE. 

Sire of Funston 2:08%, Dictatress 
2:08%. A ma A. 2:10%, and nine more in 
the list, including those speedway 
champions Liittle Dick 2:11% and Kitty 
D. 2:11%, both of which have beaten 
2:10. Dictatus is one of the best bred 
horses in America and for his oppor- 
tunities one of the greatest speed sires 
on the Coast. 

Is in good shape and ready for ser- 
vice. 

Apply to 
CLARENCE DAY, 

1462 Page Street, 

San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

The good matinee trotter Bob In- 
gersoll 2:14%, by Nutwood Wilkes, is 
offered for sale. He is in better shape 
than ever before, and is fat and all 
right. Also a black mare, three years 
old, weight 1075, 15.3 hands, and a nice 
pacer; sired by Alto Genoa 2:14%, dam 
by Alex Button; is gentle for a lady to 
drive. Also two other good, gentle, 
city-broke driving horses. 

For particulars, apply to 

FRANK LIEGINGER. 
24 West Weber ave., Stockton. 

Good Ones for Sale. 

Standard and registered stallions by McKin- 
ney, brood mares, high-class roadsters and colts 
at very reasonable prices. I am closing out all 
my horses at private sale. Am offering some of 
the best bred and best individuals on the Coast. 
Write for particulars. Address. 

THOMAS SMITH, 

1021 Georgia St.. Vallejo. Cal. 

JACK FOR SALE. 



Weighs 1,000 pounds. Is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 
9. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 

WANTED. 



A thoroughly experienced young man wishes a 
position as instructor at a riding academy, or 
with stock farm breaking and fitting polo ponies. 

Address. W. C. care of Breeder and Sportsman. 

STUD BOOKS FOR SALE. 

The first four volumes of Bruce's Ameri- 
can Stud Book, elegantly bound in 
Morocco, will be sold cheap for cash or 
exchanged for later volumes. 
Address this office, 

BREEDER and SPORTSMAN. 

W. H1GGINB0TT0M 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office with E. Stewart & Co. 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 

Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— in — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing;. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco. 



FAIRMONT 

Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The most superbly situated Ho- 
tel in the world — overlooking 
the Bay of San Francisco and 
City. 

Headquarters Army and Navy. 

The Social Center of City. 

Convenient to Business and 
Theater Sections. Reached by 
street cars from every direction. 
Only 5 minutes from ferry. 
Single Room with Bath, $2.50, 

S3, $3.50, $4. $5, 16, $7. $10. 
Suits with Bath, $10.00 upwards. 

Under Management of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

John C. Klrkpatrlck, Manager. 



ESTOR; 

CIGARETTES ■ m / 

; "Nestor" "Imported" "Royal Nestor" g 

jreen Label Wets. Blue Label £ 

25 < is. 15 CtB. £ 

Traverse the globe — from land to land § 

You'll always find the NESTOR Brand. S 

PETER SAID A SON, 911 Steiner St., 
San Francisco, Cal., Importers, Breed- 
ers and Dealers for past thirty years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, 
Hogs. High-class breeding stock. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS ' -QUINTO 
HERD. — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of 
beef and milking families for sale. 
Write us what you want. 
HOWARD CATTLE CO., San Mateo. 



GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-GLIDE 

FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 
Glide Grade — % French and % Spanish 
Merino. 

■ — Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams. — 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 297, Home Telephone, 
Sacramento, Cal. Dixon. Cal. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers In PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 

THE HORSEMAN'S HANDBOOK 

contents: 

CARE AND MANAGEMENT OF STAL1I0NS— The Stall-Pad- 
dock —Food— Diseases— Kxerclse— Grooming 
—Serving Mares— Amount of Service. 

CANE AND MANAGEMENT OF BROOD MARES-Gettiwf mares 
in foal— Care during Pregnancy— Abortion- 
Foaling— Time When Mare Is Due— In Season 
Again— Weaning Colt— Period of Gestation 
Table. 

BREAKING AND DEVELOPING OF COLTI-Care of Colt-Ed- 
ucating— Feeding— Care of Crowing Feet- 
Breaking to Drive— Developing, Shoeing and 
Booting. 

MANAGEMENT OF CAMPAIGNiRS- How to Keep the Race 
Horse in Condition and Keyed Up for a Race. 

CARE OF TNE FEET- -Booting and Shoelng-Bonner's 
and Berry's Views. 

CARE OF THE HORII IN SICKIIESS-Somo Brief, Simple 
Rules and Remedies. 

CAITIN6 ARB BALAnCMi-Correctlou of Faulty Gaits 

ANIMAL TAMING AND TRAINING— Mi'thods Employed by 
Gentry in Overcoming Wild Instincts of the 
Horse and Teaching 111m to Learn. 

STATISTICS— Championship Records of every class 
—Loading Sires of '2:30 speed Time of Fastest 
Miles by Quarters— List of High Priced Horses 
—List of Horse Associations and Registers— 
List of Horso Journals— List of Books on the 
Horse— Table of all stake winners. Conditions 
and Dates of Payments on ah Futurities, etc. 

AMERICAI TROTTING RULES-Tho Complete ButagOY- 
erning Harness Racing with Index. Omcially 
Signed by Secretary W. H. Knight, also the 
betting rules. 

USEFUL INFORMATION— Rules for Admission to Stan- 
dard Registers. Rules for Laying out 1 racks— 
—Treatment of Horse's Teeth-How to Groom 
a Horse— About Clipping Horses— V here to 
Buy Specialties for Horsemen, etc. 

( Paper Cover 50c 

PRICE \ Leatherette Cover $1 
ADDRESS 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, • SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 



RACING! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK 



First Race at 1:40 p. m. 

Six or more races each week day, 
rain or shine. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 20 
minutes until 1:40 P. M. No smoking 
in the last two cars, which are re- 
served for ladies and their escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

620 Octavia St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 2074. San Franciaco, Cal 

WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

11. '.5 Golden Gate Are. 

Branch Hospital, corner Wibster and 
Chestnut Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL,. 



RUBBEROID ROOFING. 
Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 

BONESTELL, RICHARDSON A CO., 
118 to 124 First St., San Franciaco, Cal. 

JOHN BARDUHN 

Successor to Kavanagh >fc Barduhn 

THE PALACE HOTEL TAILORS 

has removed to his permanent Quarters 
No. 7 Sutter St., near Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 




OR BINE 



Cures Strained Pulty Ankles, Lymphangitis, 
Poll Evil, Fistula, Sores, Wire Cuts, Bruis- 
es and Swellings, Lameness, and Allays 
Pain Quickly without Blistering, removing 
the hair, or laying the horse up. Pleasant 
to use. £2. no per bottle at dealers or de- 
livered. Horse Book 5 D free. 

ABSOR15INE, JR., (mankind. «1. 00 bot- 
tle.) For St rain 8, Gout, Varicose Veins, Var- 
icocele, Hydrocele, Prostatitis, kills pain. 
W. F. YOUNG, P.D.F., 54 Monmouth St., Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale bv— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore. ; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal. ; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



„n GOPA/a* 



/ 



CAPSULES 



X 



tv 



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0) 



IN ? 



) 



Saturday, January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



i: 



other condition which renders the 
extermination of cattle scabies more 
difficult is the failure of cattle own- 
ers in the mild climates to realize 
that the disease will cause a loss by 
death. In cold climates losses from 
scab of from 24 to 40 per cent are 
quite common. 

o 

HENS AND THEIR CARE. 



Cull the surplus poultry, says Mrs. 
Arthur Field in American Farm World. 
Keep only such fowls as you are as- 
sured are money makers. 

Do not crowd any of. your stock, 
especially the busy layers. Three 
square feet of room is considered right 
and proper for each fowl. 

While it is true geese only mate in 
February, they should have time to 
get used to each other and their homes 
long before .that time, else they will 
fail to breed the first year. 

Now is the time for the beginner to 
buy stock, t is cheaper than in the 
spring and he has a greater variety 
to choose from. 

December is checking-up month in 
poultry circles. Have you made money 
the past year? Perhaps you have failed 
to keep a record of your gains and 
losses. Be sure to do so during 1909. 

Do not try to start a new breed. 
There are plenty now, and you would 
be sure to get nothing but scrubs for 
your pains. 

Fowls only indulge in feather pull- 
ing when they are overcrowded or 
overfed. Give room, exercise and cut 
down the ration. 

The yarded chicken fed on concen- 
trated food and not enough grit be- 
comes crop-bound. 

Store a lot of dry leaves for the 
scratching-shed, and road dust for the 
dusting boxes. 

If you have a promising youngster 
why not enter it in your neighboring 
poultry show this winter? If she wins 
a prize her eggs will sell for $1 a dozen 
or more. 

Corn is a fine winter food if properly 
fed — that is, cracked and fed in deep 
litter. 

Is the roof on the chicken house 
water-tight? Are the runs cleaned up 
and the houses whitewashed inside, at 
least? 

Treasure every potato, turnip, beet, 
head of cabbage, etc., for the winter 
feed. 

If any of your old hens take a long 
time to molt get rid of them. Old 
hens are usually better in the pot than 
on foot. 

Feed the hen; give her water; see 
that she has warm winter quarters 
and she will give you eggs "when eggs 
is eggs." 

Get a few guineas this fall. They 
will soon take the place of our fast 
disappearing game birds with gour- 
mands and epicures. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



THK SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIICTY 
(Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco), 101 Montgomery St., 
corner Sutter St. — For the half year 
ending December 31, 1908, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Sat- 
urday, January 2, 1909. Dividends not 
called for are added to and bear the 
same rate of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1909. Money deposited 
before January 10th will draw interest 
from January 1, 1909. 

WM. A. BOSTON, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY (Member of Associated Sav- 
ings Banks of San Francisco), 526 Cali- 
fornia street. Mission Branch, 2572 
Mission street, near 22d. — For the half 
year ending December 31, 1908, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all <h- 
posits, free, of taxes, payable on and 
after Saturday, January 2, 1909. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1. 1909. 

GKORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION 
(Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco), N. W. corner Cali- 
fornia and Montgomery streets. — For 
the half year ending December 31, 190X, 
a dividend has been declared at the 
rates per annum of four and one-quar- 
ter (4V4) per cent on term deposits and 
four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Sat- 
urday, January 2, 1909. 

Depositors are entitled to draw their 
dividends at any time during the suc- 
ceeding half year. A dividend not 
drawn will be added to the deposit 
account, become a part thereof ami 
earn dividend from January 1st. 

LOVEL.L WHITE, Cashier. 



In some corner near the poultry 
yard sow a patch of rye for the hens, 
if you have not already done so. 

Remember that eggs are produced 
from the surplus food left after the 
"running expenses" of the hen's exist- 
ence are paid. However, if she gets 
fat producing food she will not lay. 
Feed a balanced ration, supplying grit 
and exercise. 

The laying hen must have meat or 
green bone if she is to do her best. 

It is the lazy hen that keeps the 
average of the flock down. The trap 
nest is the policeman who arrests her 
and judges the drones. 



There is no kind of animals where 
good blood can be found cheaper than 
among swine and where the same 
amount of money will stock a farm 
with a like number of animals in so 
short a time. 




THOUGHT GUARANTEE A BLUFF 

BINGHAM BROTHERS COMPANY 

(Founded by SAMUEL BINGHAM in 
1840) 

"MACHINE -CAST" PRINTERS ROLL- 
ERS 

No. 406 Pearl Street. New York. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Dear Sirs: — We wish to give you a 
testimonial, which we think you de- 
serve, as to the efficiency of your 
"Save-the-Horse Liniment." We have a 
valuable truck horse, which could not 
be replaced short of seven hundred 
dollars, who developed a ring bone. 
The veterinary surgeons had tried all 
their knowledge without result, except- 
ing to succeed in laying the horse up. 
For the purpose of "calling your bluff" 
in your advertising, we purchased a 
bottle from C. M. Moseman & Bro. of 
this city, and followed the directions 
diligently, with the result that the ring 
bone has entirely disappeared and the 
horse is no longer lame, has picked up 
flesh, and to-day is in just as good a 
condition as any horse could be, and it 
would be impossible for one, who has 
not known, to determine on which leg 
the ring bone had been. 

The writer, being a lover of horses, 
is giving you this testimonial for the 
purpose of passing his experience along 
to other owners. 

Sincerely yours, 
BINGHAM BROTHERS CO., 
Herbert M. Bingham, Pres. 



OTHERS ARE NOT SLOW AFTER 
"YOU SHOW ME." 

FIREMEN'S FUND INSURANCE CO., 
D. W. KILPATRICK, Resident Agent, 
Cripple Creek, Colo., Nov. 25, 1908. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. : 
Gentlemen: — Enclosed herewith P. O. 
order for $15, for which please send me 
by express as soon as possible 3 bottles 
of Save-The-Horse. Since I used if on 
my own horse for a case of thorough- 
pin the people come to me now to get it 
for them. Yours very truly, 

D. W. K 1 1. PATRICK. 

"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpfn, 
splint, shoe boll, windpuff, Injured ten- 
dons, and all lameness, without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
$5 Per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as 
the best legal talent could make It. 
Send for copy and booklet. 
At DriigglNtn nnd Denier* or Eipreu 

Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
IIIfiKluimton, N. Y. 
Formerly Troy N. Y. 
D. E. NEWEI.I,, 
ISO Iluyo VIniii Avenue, Onklnnri, Cnl. 



d and recommended by the" 
'largest fire-arms manufacturers in^ 
America. Experienced gun users every- 
where say it is the best rust preventativel 
on enrth — on water, too. 

Ilcing q light oil it enters the pores] 
of the metal and forms an impercept- 
ible c overing that is moisture-proof I 
without making the gun sticky or J 
\ma f> easy to handle. Best for oiling the 1 
In line mechanisms of the finest gun, / 
iV I wl because it does not dry out. tum.f 
PI Ijji harden, turn rancid, collect dustj 

.;*?*mvrce " amplc ' 

Sfjpni i gr w 1 " 



THREE IN ONE (HI, CO., 
102 Ni iv St.. New 1 ork City. 



The Last Chance 

for California Breeders 

To Send Mares to ZOMBRO 2 ill 

MeKINNEY'S GREATEST SON AND GREATEST SIRE OF HIS AGE. 

Zombro will be taken East next Spring and will not be returned to California. 
He will make a fall and winter season at my place, No. 3727 Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. Zombro leads all trotting bred stallions as a sire of extreme speed 
this year, and his get have won more money than the get of any sire on this 
Coast. He has been the leading Pacific Coast sire for three years — 1906, 1907 and 
1908. Sixteen of his get have entered the 2:30 list this year, and while Bingen 
and Peter the Great each have one more in 2:30 list. Zombro leads all stallions 
as a sire of new 2:10 and 2:15 performers. He has four new ones in 2:10, three of 
them trotters, six new 2:15 performers, and seven new 2:20 performers. He now 
has eight in 2:10, 16 in 2:15 and 24 In 2:20. out of a total of 48 in the 2:30 list. 
Half of his standard performers have records below 2:20. He is the greatest speed 
sire of the age. Write me for terms. 

GEO. T. BECKERS, Owner, 
3727 S. Flguerotl St., I. on Annelcs, Oil. 



Athasham 



Race Rec. 2:09 ; , 
Reg. No. 45026. 



A Came Race 
Horse in the Stud 




liny stallion, stands I.Y3, weighs 1.1 .VI. Sired by Atlmdon U I 
2:27 (sire of The Donna 2:07%, Athasham 2:09!4. Sue 2:12, I.ister- 
ine 2:18% and 8 others in 2 :30) : dam, the great brood mare Cora 
Wiclcersham (also dam of Xogi (8) 2:\~ l A. (4) 2:10%. winner of 8- 

year-old trotting division lir lers Futurity 1907 and < (trident anil 

Stanford Stakes of same year),by Junio2:'22%(sireof dams of Geo. 
G. 2:05%, etc.). Attmshnni has u great future before liim as a 
sire. He is bred right and made right, and luis every •itiulifiru- 
tion one can expect in a sire. Hi; lias been timed in 2:06% in a 
race, and his courage is unquestioned. 

He will make the Season of I'.kj'.i at Orchard Farm, Fresno, 
Cal., for a Fee of $25. Approved mares. 

For further particulars address this place. 
D. L. BACHANT, R. R. 1, Fresno, Cal. 



Save Your Stallion 

USE THE CALIFORNIA STALLION SHIELD 



The best and most effectual device in the world. 
Easily removed and adjusted as quickly as putting 
on a halter. 
Address, 

Wm. LEECH, 

(Pantentee and Sole Owner) 

318-320 Third St., Marysville, Cal. 

Stallion Folders, 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know AMD WE WILL do THE REST. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures 
made from Photographs. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS $1.00 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

Pacific BMg., Market and Fourth Sts. , San Francisco, Cal. 



McKINNEY, 2:11%. 

Sire of 20 in 2|10, 49 in 2:15, 66 in 2:20, 100 in 2:30. 
Sire of the sires of 94 in 2:30 (17 in 2:10) and 
Dams of 5 in 2:10. 

GREATEST PRODUCER AND TYPICAL SIRE THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. 



McKinney stallions are few and are worth from eight times his fee 
up. Book to others any time - to McKinney while you may. 
Only a few outside mares will be accepted. 



Makes Horses Sound— Keeps Them So 

In over 100.000 stables horses with bad lees and other troubles, such as Distem- 
per, Founder and Colic, are made sound and kept in piimc shape with 
™, mMm • m* • Cure* Bpavio Lamei . Curb, Bpllnt, Sprain, 

1 l|ttl£> C r ll"VH* 11 Ix.lCV cMH-rhneiit. 

M. Ulllv ij a_ilav*.ll Q H Tuttle'i and be »urc. A-k ui»o f..r Tuttle'i 
Worm i'owripm. Condition 1'owders ami Hoof Ointment. At dealer* or by exprcM. 
Valuable Vetarlnery Book Fraa. The Lot K"ldo for liomemcn In all cinerKencle*. 
Wrlto for It today. 

TUTTLE*S ELIXIR CO.. 52 Beverly SI., Boston. Mass. 

MACK & CO., ben Franclaco, and K. w. UKAUN, Urn Angelex; California Audit*. 




14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



WORK FOR A HIGH STANDARD. 



.Much of the progress of the world 
has been made by fanatics. It takes a 
full fledged crazy man to inoculate the 
i c st of humanity with that, enthusiasm 
to do, that ultimately marks a great 
movement. So in your breeding of 
Huff Rocks get cranky on some sub- 
ject. They have reached a degree of 
perfection as a whole that is gratifying 
and surpassed by no other breed or 
variety, so now let us intensify the 
little things. While still keeping in 
mind a systematical whole, bend your 
energies on some section, and inten- 
sify the perfection of that point so 
that all the progeny of that bird will 
carry the results of your hobby. 

Why can't one take a run on par 
ticularly perfect combs? We need 
them, and as we gain in the excellence 
of general points, everyone will want 
a strain of birds that have great pre- 
potency towards a firm, strong and low 
comb, one which meets the ideal of 
the standard. 

Wouldn't it 1><> worth while to have 
a pre-eminent reputation for breeding 
the exact shade of dee]) bay eye the 
standard calls for? Many breeders 
need a little help on this score. Cut- 
ting is not so severe on an off-colored 
eye, and there is an occasional ten- 
dency toward carelessness. A strain 
that will immediately stamp that char- 
acteristic on any cross will make a 
name for itself. The eye of a man is 
an index to the character, and this is 
true of your full-blooded fowl. His 
eye indicates constitution, vigor and 
style, too. 

We have bright, yellow legs natural- 
ly, but still if in walking down an alley 
of a show one could tell Mr. Blank s 
birds from a particularly bright yellow 
leg, his reputation would be made. 

Did you ever realize the difference 
in texture of the feathers of various 
birds? You know that there is a hard 
shade of buff and a soft shade as ap- 
plied to the feeling. The breeder who 
gets that velvety softness together 
with under-color, will find that his old 
birds and pullets will have exactly the 
same shade. He will find no trouble 
selling every bird he raises, either. 

And so all down the line. Many a 
breeder's birds can be told by some 



little peculiarity, but in some cases, 
unfortunately, it is a defect of more 
or less seriousness. Rather should 
your birds be known by certain fea 
lures of nearer approach to full stand- 
ard requirements. The one who is 
fascinated by pure fancy can have his 
hobby and find it profitable at the 
same time. 



It is both good reason and good 
practice to turn cows out in the lot 
or pasture for daily exercise. No 
animal can remain perfectly healthy 
and stand or lie in one place all the 
time without change. A cow con 
stantly confined in a stall may be able 
to give a good flow of milk for a long 
time, but the confinement is bound 
by natural laws to weaken her phys- 
ically and to reduce the vitality of the 
calves to which she gives birth. 

GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 

Herbert union. No. 14624, 5-year-old 
chestnut stallion by Siilnt y Dillon, dam 
I.izc tc by Abdallali Wilkes, sound, has 
shown miles in 2:16, quarters In 82% 
seconds, eighths in 16 seconds. One of 
ttie best prospects in California. If not 
sold will be leased for the breeding or 
lacing season, or both, of 1909 to a 
responsible party. 

I.e«n union, 2-year-old (illy by Her- 
bert Dillon. No. 4-1624, dam Klecta by 
Escort, second dam Ruth by Stelnway, 
perfectly sound, can show a 2:20 gal! 
at the Mot 

Coralng c.iri, the great yearling 

pacer by Lorinn. No. 15112. dam Klecta 
by Escort, second dam Until by Stein- 
way, paced a mile in 2:27 '4 in third po- 
sition on the Woodland track last 
August. Paces quarters in '■> :'. 1 1 sec- 
onds, eighths In 16 secon Is: perfectly 
«ound and entered in t'antield Stakes 
for lHO'.l and 1910; wears neither hob- 
bles nor boots. 

itu-.c7.clla. 8 -year-Old Qlly by I'alrosc. 
dam Nora s. by Sable Wilkes, dam 
of Marvin Wilkes; perfectly sound; 
never trained but trotted a mile in 2:53, 
ljst quarter in 39>4 seconds a few 
w. eks after being taken out of the 
pasture to be broken. Price $300. 

Pedro, brown gelding. 4-year-old, 
bj Loring, No. 45142, dam Kuth by 
St. inwfty. .lust being broken buc shows 
le tter (ban a :i minute gait in breaking 
exit. A great prospect. Address. 



P. \. 



It \ !t > Kt-.l it I u IV. < at. 



Gombautt's 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest and Surest 

Veterinary Remedy 

HAS IMITATORS BUT NO COMPETITORS ! 



SAFE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE. 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SKIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE. 

PINK EYE, 

SWEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS. 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL, 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We guarantee that one tnWespoonful of Caustic 
Bal -am will produce more actual results than a whole 
buttle of any liniment or spavin mixture ev< r made 
Every bottle sold ia warranted to give satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the most proml 
Dent horseman say of It. J'noe. SI. &0 per bottle. 
Sold by drucrgiats, or sent by express, charges paid, 
wiih full directions for Its use. 

The Accented Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliable:. 

Sure In Results. 




SoU Importers ^-Proprietors for Vie 
^U.S.fi CAUADAS, 



CLEVELAND, 



nothing nrT noon itissui ts 

Havensed GOKBAUirSCiPSIIO BALAAM f„ r n'ore 
years. ltiath.«besthlisterIh«voc>ertried.lhs 
t eases w ith best result,. It i: 



| 

■4 it in hundred 



■ 7»vZl*_L > !. ''^"'^'""Perienrcdpeison loose. Thli 

.ii,.l.y ? e,tl,r.-,.i.n 1( wtrirtiihniMrt oft irottlnatonM in 
the world ..ndiijo your blister often. -W. II. Ml >.tr*D, 
lr..p. H,<i,„„,t M Muck r.rm, l., „ „, I'a.k, >|„„ t 



tJSFO 10 TTCAU<5 STTrTrs<SFrT,T.T. 

Ih.iv.used GOMBAVI.T S CAUSTIC BALSAM for tea | 
'ears ; have been very successful in curing eurh.ringbon 
ICftppad hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism , and .ill 
I must every cause of lameness in horses Have astableof | 
I forty head, mostly track and speedway horses, and cer- 
tainly c m recommend it.— I*. C. IHaHI.lt, Training I 
Stable.. U90 jroolegs Street, New York City. 1 



Sole Agents for tSio United States and Canada* 

The Lawrence- Williams Co, 

TORONTO, ONT. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



The Stallion Number 

\\\\\\\\\\\v\\%*\,\\w,\\\%\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\v\\\\\\\a 



-OF THE — 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

i,\\\\N\\\\N\\\\\\N\N\\\\\\s>\\NN\\\\NVV\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ 



It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on ihis coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news 
and articles thai will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 



As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many- 
owners are not ready to say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should havo 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturda5 r , January 2, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



Campbell's 



E MO L LI C 
IODOFORM 




i , IODOFORM . 



GALL REMEDY 



FOR 

HARNESS 5 SHOULDER GALLS. BARBED YflftE CUTS.j 
p> CALKS, SCRATCHES AND OTHER Ay 
AILMENTS OF THE SKIN. ^ 





Gall Remedy 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, 
CRUPPER SORES and SADDLE GALLS 
there is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 

USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS. 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN it has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning. We placed it on the market 
relying wholly on its merits for success. 
The sales of 1906 were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Gall Remedy preceding that year. This 
increase was entirely due to its MER- 
ITS, and it is THE GALL REMEDY OF 
THE 20th CENTURY. 

It is quick and sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
which Injure and often lay up race 
horses. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1219. 



All Trainers Should Keep It in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00. 

(Read our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them 
lo write any Jobber for it. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



BOOKS FOR STALLION OWNERS 

1. Hoover's Stallion Service Record. 

The most complete book for recording stallion service ever placed before breeders. 
Not a pocket edition. No more disputing of sires. No more mixing of dams where this 
book is used. There is space for entering Ida mares, giving their full breeding, description, 
dates of service, dates of foaling, etc., with index, complete, size 10x7' j. Each book is hand- 
somely and substantially bound $2.00, 

2. The Standard Stallion Service Book. 

The neatest Service nook published, containing space for entering 100 mares, giving 
space for full description, pedigree, date of services and refusals, date of foaling, etc., with 
index complete, neatly bound in leatherine, suitable lor pocket use $1.00 

3. Breeder's Note and Certificate Book and Stallion Service 

Book Combined. 

This book contains 7.1 blank certificates to he given to owners of mares, certifying that 
said mare has been bred to a certain stallion. Also 75 notes suitable for owner of mare giv- 
ing to owner of stallion on account of stallion service fee. This book is well bound, and makes 
a book like No. 2, after certificates and notes have been removed $1.00 

ADDRESS 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



AXWORTHY, 2:15'/ 2 . s l£? N l? £Z" 

Sire of 59 in 2:30, including 

World's greatest trotting- mare World's greatest three-year-old 

Hamburg Belle, 2:04% Gen. Watts (3), 2:06% 

If you wish to book - be quick while his book is sti'l open. 
For particulars, mention this paper and address, 

uffa jEmpirr (Hitg jParmg. Lexington, Ky. 



Jami 



No road too rough. Has 
cushion tires and carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Nevera tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding.and doesnway 
witli all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with Pneumatic tires. 



W. J. KENNEY, 



Sales agent for 
California. 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 

531 Valencia Slreet, San Francisco 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 



Breeder and Sportsman 



"NEW SCHULTZE" 

Smokeless Shot Gun Powder 

THE OLD-TIME FAVORITE 

c«8SC8»5^;»:»C'C">>:"X>ocm>ch^0ooo 

Hard Grain, 



Smokeless, 

Uniform, 

Clean Burning' 
Stability Guaranteed 

Loaded in All First-Class Shells 



Ask Your Dealer for 



"New Sch ultze" 

A Powder for the Most Critical! 

MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS. 



E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 




I 

I- ■■)-., ,.\, <t , ^Imi.iin-T , u ilb oven distribution '& 

end 'rend i .. 1 1. -t t-.-- t i< -i ■ . ;i re essential qualities m 
thct ii gun must possess for the vers i»'-t success f 
Pi tin' tn'ps. 

'inns imve m world-wide reputation ."or |j 
their winr shooting qualitii 

" I'ob" Kdw ;m-i1s . ii,,' veteran luirrel borer, who ''A 
first bored Ithaca Guns in 1883, i^stilHjMfc— his 
experience nt your Command. 
Kvery Ithaca Gun is guaranteed in evgw part— & 
hammerless guns are lined « ith iieve and \ 

eeii main springs , which are gn* rani 1 n iwvr | 

against breakage, weakness or lost tension. 

Pond for Art Catalog and special prices: is 1 
grades S17.7. r i pet to 0.00 list. 

Pacific Coast Branch— Will. B. Rekeart Co., 
717 Market St.. Sap Francisco. 



ITHACA, N. ~Y. 



Fishing 
Tackle.... 



I All Cradcs. i 



GUNS, SPORTING, ATHLETIC and OUTING GOODS 




I'linne Dnllgl 



1 for I a.taloguo, 



PALACE HARDWARE CO., 581 Market St., 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Take If In Time, 

If you have the remedy ou hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WindpiifTa and 
Hunches which will not field promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 

Ithafl pave. I 1 1 1 lUMUldflOf u-oof| hoinat from the I Sdrilf>r*f 
cart and the broken <iown horse nmrket. Mr. U. ii. lilek. 
i ns, of Minnrnpoll*. Minn., who conducts onoof i ho Impost I. very ptabti s In the Ncrthweii 

rites a* follows- I Imve liven uslinr Qulnn'a Olnlmont lor mime 1 1 me n i .1 wl I h the I t 
irceaa. I take plearureln rccomnionuliiK It to my l'i lemln. No honu-innn shmihl be with.' 
out It Inhli stablo. For curb". spline, spavins, windmill s nml nil bunches It bus DOfqnaJ." 
' Prloa a 1 .00 par bettla. Hold bj all drUKKims or ten t b> mill. Wtltc >m for circular*, 

tfSug&iA^" W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 2, 1909. 



Fine 

Harness. 



The Best Horse Boots 



ORSE BOOTS 




WINCHESTER 

REPEATING SHOTGUNS. ALMOST A HALF MILLION IN USE 

Four hundred and fifty thousand men, each armed with a Winchester Repeating Shot- 
gun, would be a wonderfully impressive sight. We can't arrange such a spectacle, but we 
can truthfully say that over 450,000 of these guns are in use. This is the best illustration 
that can be given of the universal popularity of the Winchester Repeating Shotgun, due to 
its entire reliability, great serviceability and low price. It's the repeater that works well, 
shoots well and is made well. It has been officially endorsed by the U. S. Ordnance 
Board as strong, sure and safe. Winchester Repeating Shotguns are made in 10, 12 and 
16 gauges, and are unequalled for field, fowl or trap shooting. Then why not buy one ? 

DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



SOLD BY ALL, 



SHOT GUN 



v 



FOR FIELD and TRAP SHOOTING 
Hold All the Best Records 

None "Just as Good" 

CARRIED BY THE BEST TRADE 

SMELTING & LEAD CO., 

San Francisco. 



EARTH'S WONDERS 



Yosemite— 

Open the year 'round. The quick way is Santa 
Fe to Merced; thence Yosemite Valley Railroad. 

Grand Canyon— 

The biggest thing in the world. El Tovar hotel 
on brink of Canyon. 
Under Fred Harvey management, one of the finest 
hotels in southwest. — Our folders tell. 
H. K. GREGORY, \..,. p. a , Ban Francisco. JOHN. J. BYRNE, a p. t. If., Log Angelas 





r 


■ 




Santa Fe 




I 





New Edition of John Splan's Book 

"Life With the Trotter" 

Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotter gives us a clear insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be, read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. BaUJIU and Sportsman, P. O. Drawer San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific Rldg.. for. >farket and Fourth Sts. 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough. (Joleher & Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 

phon, T.mporary 1883. 5 10 Market St., San Francisco 



Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It improves 
and keeps stock In the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P. 
Kertel. Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 




VOLUME LIV. No. 2. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 1909. Subscription— $3.00 Per Year. 




2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



T Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



$ 5,000 



REOPENED 



GUARANTEED. 



$ 5,000 



The State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 1 



GUARANTEED. 



Foals of Mares Covered in 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$2900 for Trotting Foals. - 



TO BE CIVEN BY THE 



$2100 for Pacing Foals. 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Entries to close February 1, '09. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



SI00 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

Mare was bred. 

FORTWO-YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1911 

TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS .... $800 
TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS 500 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR-THREE-YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1912 

THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS . . . $2000 
THREE-YEAR-OLD PACERS .... I500 



,te mare on February 1. 1903, when name, color, description of marc and stallion bred to must be given- $5 Julv 1 
iy .'. 1 !< 1 n ; $111 ,,n Two-Yea r-< lids. K, .binary 1. Hill; $10 on Tin Year-Olds, February 1 I'll" 

fwo-Year-Old Pace; $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start 



i:\Tll\M K V\l» l'» \ llKM'S — $2 to nominate mare on February 1, 
1909; $•"> December 1, 1!»0!); $10 on Yearlings. February 

STARTING I'WMKNTS — $15 to start in the Two- 
in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at Which the race is to take place. 

Nominator* mual designate when mnklng payment* to start whether the horite entered In a Trotter or Paeer. 

i ..lis that .start at two yearn old are not barred from starting again In the three-year-old divisions. 

l or Entry Illaiik.s and further particulars, nddresn the Secretary. 

CONDITIONS: 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2-in-3, and for Three-Year-Olds, 3-in-5. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three-Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or nllps or has n dead foal or twins, or If either the mare or foal dies before Kebrnary I. mm. her nominator mn> sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will nny entry be liable for more than amount 
paid in or contracted for. Iu entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred in 1908. 

Kntries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid In. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5,000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes In case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Write for Entry Blanks to 



B. F. RUSH, 

President. 



J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 



Owners of Live Stock in California 
Should Insure in Their Own Associatinn, 



The California Mutual Live 
Stock Insurance Association 



Because 



It is the only institution of the kind organized under the laws of 
California with the home office in this State 

We insure live stock against death from disease, tire, lightning, 
tornado, cyclones and every casually; also through accident which may 
necessitate the death of any animal. 

Losses are paid promptly without discount and without unnecessary 
delay. 

We have a guaranty deposit under the control of tin- State Treasurer 
for the protection of our members and policy holders. 

There is $100 of values lost to farmers by death of stock, by disease 
and accident, where $1 is lost by fire. 

We have no dividend)! or profits paid to idle office holders. 

The business of the Association is conducted as economically as is 
consistent with gootl management, and the earnings are divided among 
the policy holders. 

This is an age of Mutual Insurance, and it is true the cheapest anil 
strongest companies in the United States to-day are composed of and 
managed by the policy holders, who are farmers and stockmen, as has 
been demonstrated in the Fast. 

The directors and officers are elected annually by the policy holders. 

WHY PAY LARGE PREMIUMS FOR PROFIT TO EASTERN 
COMPANIES WHEN YOU CAN CO-OPERATE WITH YOUR FELLOW 
FARMER AND STOCKMAN AND SECURE YOUR INSURANCE AT 

COST? 

We are receiving daily many testimonials 

from policy holders whose claims have been and are being promptly and 

satisfactorily settled. 

References : 

Oakland Bank of Savings. Oakland. Cal.; National Bank of California 
Lios Angeles, Cal.; Secretary Sav ings Bank. Bos Angeles, Cal.. or any 
reliable bank in the Stale. 

M. L. WRIGHT, Pres. I. A. WRIGHT, Secy. 

IIomi: Office ; 270-271-272 Bacon Building, 12th St. anil Broadway, 
Phone Oakland 3990. OAKLAND, Cal. 

Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Robes 



For your 
Automobile 
Or your 
Carriage 



The elegance and quality combined in our imported 
robes and blankets place them beyond the pale of com- 
parison. We have them in shades, sizes and prices that 
will please the most fastidious. 

Ymir carriage or automobile is incomplete without at 
least one of these. They lend style and comfort and 
place yon in an atmosphere of luxury and refinement 
which yon otherwise cannot obtain. As an elegant and 
appropriate Christmas gift von could make no more 
pleasing selection. Call anil look them over. We court 
ci impetition. 



Fremont 



at 



Mission 




Phone 
Douglas 
3O00 



Distemper Always Dangerous. 

Valuable horses fall easy victims to this often fatal dis- 
ease. When it once breaks out it spares none. To prevent its 
spread and cure the sick, put a teaspoonful of CKAFT'S DIS- 
TKMI'KK I'l'liK in tile feed or on the tongue one.- a day anil 
your trouble will soon end. (let it from your druggist or we 

will send it prepaid, B0 cents and $1.00 a bottle, p. k. nkwkbl. 

.,ii H.iyti Vista avenue, Oakland. Cal.. Bad lie Coast Agent. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 




> 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



a 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms — One Year $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE ASSOCIATIONS that contemplate giving trot- 
ting meetings in California this year should not wait 
to see what their neighbors propose to do, but claim 
their dates and announce their purses forthwith. 
There is nothing that will start the ball rolling 
quicker than for some association that owns or con- 
trols a track to come out with a good program for 
1909. As soon as one good meeting is announced the 
other towns will want to follow suit, and before any- 
one realizes it, a circuit will be formed. Three or 
four early closing purses with a value of from $800 
to $1,000 each, and the rest of the program made up 
of $500 purses to close not earlier than two weeks 
before the meeting would suit the majority of horse 
owners. We hope the old plan of closing all the pro- 
grams before the first meeting will not be followed 
this year as it helps no one and injures the chances 
of many. Thre are 150 horses now at Pleasanton 
and nearly twice that number at Los Angeles, to 
say nothing of the many tracks where from ten to 
forty horses are now stabled preparatory to being 
trained in the spring, and if a complete circuit is 
announced in February these horses, or the ma- 
jority of them will be sent along to see if they will 
do to race. The earlier the programs are an- 
nounced the larger lists of entries will be obtained. 
Let us hear as soon as possible from Los Angeles, 
Fresno, Salinas, Santa Rosa, Woodland, Stockton, 
Marysville and Chico. There should be a good meet- 
ing at each of these places, and there are twenty 
other tracks where smaller meetings can be profit- 
ably given. What town will be first on the list to 
announce its program? 

o 

MR. C. C. CRIPPEN, well known to every horseman 
in California, has been engaged by the Breeder and 
Sportsman as a special contributor to its columns, 
and is now on a tour of the State, visiting the train- 
ing tracks and stock farms in the interests of this 
journal. Mr. Crippen is a practical horseman, having 
been employed for a number of years at the old 
Palo Alto Stock Farm, afterwards managing the 
stallions Searchlight 2:03 1 ,4 and Lecco 2:09% at 
Pleasanton, and for the past few years being as- 
sociated with Budd Doble in training the young 
Kinney Lous at San Jose, until the dispersal sale of 
these youngsters last October. Mr. Crippen wields a 
facile pen and has been an occasional contributor 
to the columns of this paper for years, but this is 
his first venture as a regular news and business 
hunter for a newspaper. He visited Pleasanton last 
Saturday and the result of this call is to be found 
on another page. Besides being a practical horseman 
Mr. Crippen has been a close student of breeding 
and pedigrees and we know of no one who can write 
up a horse for our coming stallion number better 
than he, and we commend him (o our patrons. 
o 

GIL CURRY, who recently returned from a trip to 
Los Angeles, says he saw some great trotting there 
on Christmas day when the driving club held its 
matinee. But the greatest trotting he ever saw, and 
he has been on many stock farms and driven many 
colts, was done by the Bon Voyage yearlings. He 
says he never before saw such youngsters. The 
one out of the Oakland Baron mare trotted a quar- 
ter in 33 seconds, and then Mr. Curry saw Mr. Clark 
refuse $3,000 for it. These youngsters, an account 
of whoso performances was recently given in these 
columns arc now running out in the day time and 
will not have a harness on for some time. Mr. Curry 
says they are certainly phenomenal and it looks as 
if Bon Voyage is to be the next sensational colt 
sire of America. 



W. H. SMOLLINGER, Secretary of the Great West- 
ern Circuit, at a meeting of the stewards, made an 
address from which the following extract is taken: "I 
advocate a system as old as harness racing itself. I 
suggest a program which has daily at least one race 
that is an early closing event, an early closing nom- 
ination purse— horses to be named thirty days prior 
to the meeting. This will insure a fair field — a sharp, 
real contest of horses that class one with each other — 
and makes a race in which the skill of the driver 
counts for something. The very best races at Ham- 
line were the St. Paul and Minneapolis, while raced 
practically under the nomination plan. The purse 
races should under no circumstances close earlier 
than two weeks before the meeting. The races should 
be two in three and to a finish. This will class 
the horses every two weeks. It will enable those who 
desire to do so to race twice a week. There will be 
somewhere along the circuit a place where every 
horse will have had a chance to win. It will make 
classes for 2:09 and 2:10 trotters in the West after 
the first meeting or two. It will make racing where 
skill in driving and race horse quality will win over 
mere speed. It will put a premium on ability for 
horse and driver. A race to interest the public must 
be a contest. A procession whether at a two-min- 
ute clip or a funeral gait is uninteresting.'' 
o 

THE STALLION NUMBER of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, to be issued February 27th, will be a 
little ahead of anything we have ever issued along 
these lines. It will be superbly illustrated with the 
pictures of some of the leading money winners and 
fastest horses of 1908 and will contain many tables 
and interesting articles on horse breeding written 
by different persons who are experts on these sub- 
jects. We want to have a complete roster of all the 
trotting and pacing stallions that will stand for pub- 
lic service in California this year, and to this end 
will ask every owner to communicate with us imme- 
diately in regard to this matter. A very handsome 
cover in colors will adorn the number and the paper 
will be printed in the very highest style of the press- 
man's art. Those who miss advertising their stal- 
lions in this number will not be looking properly af- 
ter their best interests. If you have no picture of 
your stallion, get one taken immediately and send 
it in with your advertisement. Breeders are now 
considering stallions that will stand for service this 
year and will be looking to see what you have to 
say about yours. 

o 

MINOR HEIR 1:59%, the champion pacer of last 
year, has been purchased by M. W. Savage, owner of 
champion Dan Patch 1:55, for $45,000. Mr. Savage 
will probably race these two great pacers together at 
the fairs through the Middle West, where Dan Patch 
has been such a drawing card for years. It will be 
a great sight to see the two fastest pacers in the 
world striving for supremacy, and we predict right 
now that Mr. Savage will clear the price of Minor 
Heir by these exhibitions within a year. The two 
champion stallions will be the biggest features of the 
big fairs of 1909. 

o 

THE TROTTER Kid Wilkes by Stanton Wilkes 
that won a heat in 2:10% at San Bernardino on 
Christmas Day looks like the real thing, as he has 
had little training. He should be good enough to 
race through the circuit this year. By the way, San 
Bernardino County is turning out a lot of fast ones 
lately, but this is not surprising, as there are so 
many well-bred stallions and mares in the southern 
country. 

■ 

The fourth annual exhibition of the National 
Western Stock Show will be formally opened to the 
public on Monday, January 18th, and continue for 
the whole week. The judging will commence at 9 
o'clock Monday morning iti the new amphitheater 
and there will probably be four judges at work most 
of the time until the work is completed during the 
latter part of the week. During the day work will 
be principally in judging but every evening, com- 
mencing at 8 o'clock, there will be an exhibition in 
the arena of the new amphitheater which will at- 
tract everyone. The evening program will consist 
of horse show classes, parades of prize winning 
stock of all kinds and exhibitions of riding and 
driving. This part of the entertainment is intended 
particularly for the city people who want to see with 
the least expenditure of effort. The handsome new 
building just completed is comfortably seated with 
opera chairs, lighted brilliantly and comfortably 
heated by steam. It will be worth the price of admis- 
sion just to see the new building with the crowd in 
it and the indications are that the stock show will 
be a popular fad with the public in Denver and from 
around the state. 



CALIFORNIA HORSES IN AUSTRALIA. 



Clark McKinney, the horse known as Tertius that 
W. A. Clark, Jr., sold to Australia in 1907, won a 
race there last November, time 2:36%. Clark Mc- 
Kinney is by McKinney, dam She 2:12% by Ab- 
botsford. At the same meeting the mare Lady Elect 
by Re-Election, dam Irish Lady won a race in 2:30. 
Both these mares were purchased by Andrew Rob- 
ertson. 

The probability is that the pacer Dan Burns 2:15 
by William Harold, dam Linda by Hawthorne, has 
been on a ringing tour in Australia under the name 
of Harold Boy. Dan Burns was sold at auction in this 
city on September 29th, 1903, by Fred H. Chase & Co. 
acting for the Meek Estate. He was purchased by 
King Hedley for $450, who drove him on the road 
and afterward shipped him to Australia. It is said 
that a year afterwards Hedley sold the horse and 
went to England. The man who purchased the horse 
registered him with the Victoria Trotting Associa- 
tion as Harold Boy by William Harold, dam Lena, 
and as bred by H. W. Meek. He then started him in 
the slow classes and has won several races, un- 
til now the horse has an Australian record of 2:19. 
The Victoria Trotting Association cabled Mr. H. 
W. Meek some time ago the description of Harold Boy 
and Mr. Meek replied that it corresponded with Dan 
Burns 2:15. Mr. Meek at this writing is on a tour 
of Mexico with his family, but is expected home in a 
few days, when we will get as complete a description 
of the horse as possible and publish it for the benefit 
of our Australian readers. There is little doubt but 
the horse masquerading as Harold Boy is no other 
than the pacer Dan Burns 2:15. 

As we remember Dan Burns he was a brown pacing 
horse about. 16 hands, with considerable white on 
legs. He took his record at Petaluma at the meet- 
ing of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association held there in 1903. He made the record 
in an effort to beat 2:23. 

In our next issue we shall try to print the docu- 
mentary proofs of the breeding of this horse, his 
sale and shipment to Australia, together with a full 
and complete description of him. We cannot find 
any such mare as Lena in Mr. Meek's catalogues. 
In the catalogue of the sale when Dan Burns was pur- 
chased by King Hedley, the horse is given as a brown 
gelding, foaled 1899. 

Norice, the black mare by Chas. Derby 2:20 that 
Pettee & Price of Australia, 'purchased in Califor- 
nia in 1903, is winning races in her new home very 
frequently. She now has a record of 2:20 from a 
standing start on a half mile track, and a two mile 
record of 4:44. Norice's dam is Naulahka by Balkan 
2:15, second dam Lucy E. by Black Walnut 1736, 
third dam Ethel by Enfield 128, and fourth dam by 
Peck's Idol. This mare Naulahka should not be 
confounded with another mare of the same name 
that has a pacing record of 2:14, is the dam of 
Prince Lock (2) 2:18, and is by Nutford 2:15. 

o 

CLAIMS A MAJORITY FOR THE BILL. 



A dispatch from Sacramento states that the Anti- 
Race Track League is assured of a comfortable ma- 
jority in both houses of the Legislature. Out of 120 
votes the league feels sure of 72. In the Assembly 
there are eight votes to spare and in the Senate there 
ar four more than a majority. The following twenty- 
four members of the Senate have practically pledged 
themselves to vote for the bill: 

Charles W. Bell, Marshall Black, A. Caminetti. K. 
O. Miller, W. H. Savage. George S. Walker, A. E. 
Boynton. George Cartwright. Benjamin F. Hush. 
Charles H. Cutten, E. A. Birdsall, Miguel Estudillo. 
B. K. Strobridge, J. Clem Bates, John W. Stetson, 
N. W. Thompson, L. H. Roseberry, H. M. Hurd, J. 
B. Hollohan, A. E. Campbell. 10. B. Martinelli. J. B. 
Curtin and LeRoy Wright. 

Senators Henry M. Willis, Walter F. Price and C. B. 
Bills have not committed themselves but are ex- 
pected confidently to vote for it. 

Forty-eight Assemblymen have signified their In- 
tention to vote against the race track. They are: 

Kenneth C. Gillis. William Kehoe, Samuel Fletcher, 
A. M. Dean, H. Posley, W. J. Costar, A. H. Hewitt, P. 
H. Johnson.J. L. Mendenhall, Grove L. Johnson. Ed- 
ward I. Butler, T. D. Johnston, R. L. Beardslee, C. W. 
Wagner, E. B. Moore, Thomas H. Silver, Frank Otis, 
James T. Feely, George J. Hans, C. C. Young, John 
W. Mott, H. W. Pulcifer. L. D. Bohnett, A. M. 
Drew, W. R. Odon, W. J. Webber, George L. Sack- 
ett, J. B. Maher, Bowen Irwin, Oscar Gibbons. H. G. 
Cattell, B. F. Cogswell. Hairy Barndollar. Walter 
R. Leeds, P. A. Stanton. J. N. O. Rech, J. P. Tan 
sue, William J. Hanlon, Percy V. Hammond. W. B. 
Griffiths, L. H. Wilson. J. W. St rukenbruck, Robert 
L. Telfer, Richard Melrose, G. W. Wvlle, E. J. Cal- 
lan, E. C. Hinkle and F. M. Rutherford. 

o 

The newly organized Fresno City Driving Club 
effected permanent organization last week, adopted 
a constitution and by-laws, and elected a full set ot 
officials. Although called the Fresno club, it is open 
to membership from horsemen all over the San Joa- 
quin Valley. 

The officers of the organization are: D. L. Bachant, 
president; A. S. Kellogg, vice-president; C. A. Telfer. 
secretary and treasurer. The directors are D. L. 
Bachant, J. B. McDonald. Frank Malcolm. A. S. Kel- 
logg, A. Allen. II. C. McKay, and .1. Suglian. 

The first matinee of the new organization will be 
held on February 22nd at the Fresno Fair grounds, 
and it is proposed to have the best program of racing 
that has been seen in that city for some time. 
The horses will be classified according to their pres- 
ent speed and not by their records. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



I A RAINY DAY AT PLEASANTON I 



g (By C. C. Crippen.) g 

Last Saturday was a wet day, and the track at 
Pleasanton was a muddy one, so we did not have 
the pleasure of seeing any of the many good young 
trotters and pacers that are being worked there 
perform, but the wet weather did not prevent us 
from looking them over and hearing their merits 
described by their owners and trainers and groom- 
sters. There are a lot of two-year-olds, mostly by 
the old champion Star Pointer and the great young 
sire Bon Voyage, that show for themselves that 
they are no common things. There are also others. 

None have shown phenomenal speed and none have 
had more than the lightest work yet — nearly every 
one could, before the first of the year, in their 
yearling form, show quarters in 40 seconds and 
better, and any yearling that can step a quar- 
ter in 40 seconds without drilling, is a good pros- 
pect, and later on is very likely to beat the one 
that has been drilled and gone faster. 

Among the older horses in training there are very 
few that have yet caused any excitement among 
the railbirds. But the year is young and I antici- 
pate that in a couple of months from now re- 
ports of red hot speed at Pleasanton will be floating 
through the air as usual. Hay, straw and grain are 
so high now that a horse ought to make speed much 
faster than when the same cost only one-half as 
much as it does at the present time. Yet I haven't 
heard of any liberal hearted owner volunteering to 
pay the trainer $10 more a month for training his 
horse than he did when hay was $10 per ton, 
straw 40 cents per bale and oats $1.40 per hun- 
dred. 1 wonder what the ordinary owner would do 
if the trainer would ask for $10 advance in the 
price of training? It is ten to one that if he didn't 
fall dead he would order the horse sent home. So 
I suppose its up to the poor trainer if he wants to 
stay in the business to carry both the horse and 
owner a while longer and let the grocer and the 
butcher and the feed man carry him. The horses 
have got to be trained or there will be no races. 

Considerable improvement has been made in the 
track on the back stretch. Mr. Ronan is now at work 
on the first turn; when the work there is com- 
pleted and the drainage on the home stretch im- 
proved the track will be in better shape than ever 
before. 

Mr. Ronan has also started building a stall and 
paddock for Bon Voyage that is expected to ar- 
rive from Los Angeles with Ted Hayes in charge 
about the 15th. From the showing the youngsters 
by this son of Expedition are making he ought to be 
quite a busy horse this coming season. 

Ed Parker has two elegant looking two-year-olds 
by Bon Voyage out of Missie Medium, dam of Happy 
Madison 2:12, and Sidlette (3) 2:17%, daughter of 
the great Sidney. Their names are Bonnie Medium 
and Bonnylette. Both showed quarters in 40 sec- 
onds and better as yearlings, although they had 
but little work. They are well staked. Besides 
these two Mr. Parker has in his string the bay 
pacing mare Niquee by Joe Patchen 2:01%, dam 
Oneone 2:11% by Woodford Wilkes, which he thinks 
very highly of. In the next stall is the two-year- 
old North Star Pointer by the old champion out of 
.Maid of Del Norte 2:16. This colt is a real pacer and 
a good one. Both he and Niquee are owned by 
C. A. Harrison, known from Southern California 
to British Columbia as a successful hotel man and 
an enthusiastic lover of a good horse. 

Myrtha W., bay filly, three-year-old, by Derby 
Direct out of the good race mare Myrtha Whips 
2:09, is a smooth going pacer and has been a half 
in t:09 as a two-year-old. Mr. Parker has also the 
sire of this filly, Derby Direct, a black six-year-old 
horse, 16 hands, that worked a mile as a three-year- 
old in 2:19, last quarter in .31. Sired by Charles 
Derby 2:20, first dam by Direct 2:05%; second 
dam by Echo. A yearling full brother to Bonnie 
Medium completes his string which are all the prop- 
erty of Mrs. Geo. A. Davis, except the two owned 
by Mr. Harrison. 



Jack Phippen has eleven head. Elsidelo, a six- 
year old chestnut gelding, by Owyhee 2:11, dam 
Proserpina by Diablo, is an oily going pacer that 
looks good to me. 

Unlmak, the full brother to the great Sterling 
McKinney 2:06%, is the property of Capt. C. H. 
Williams and a horse likely to become one of the 
good speed sires of the great McKinney. 

Another good looking, well bred son of McKinney 
is Mr. Phippen's own property. He is a bay, six- 
year-old, first dam Dixie by Chas. Derby 2:20, next 
dam Ramona, dam of W. Wood 2:07 by Anteeo 2:16%. 

A black mare by Daedalion 2:08%, out of Silver- 
haw, dam of the great young trotter Helen Stiles, 
by Silverbow 2:16, is a good gaited mare that will 
learn to go some. A black colt, four-year-old, by 
Bonnie Direct, dam by Chas. Derby, is a good trot- 
ting prospect. 

Brown filly, three-ye ar old, by Milbrae 2:16%, dam 
l>y Campaign, trotter. 

Bay colt, two year old. by Bon Voyage, dam Sil- 
verhaw. worked quarters better than 40 seconds as 
a yearling. Mr. Phippen thinks this one of the 
best young prospects he ever had. 

Bay colt, yearling, by Bon Voyage, dam Athene 
2:22 by Dexter Prince, second dam Athena 2:15% 



by Electioneer, third dam Ashby, great brood mare 
by Gen. Benton. 

Chas. Sumner, bay stallion, 16.1, by St. Nicholas, 
dam by Daly 2:15, next dam by Milton Medium. 
This is a handsome, stylish horse that came from 
nothing to a mile in 2:27 in three months. This will 
make a good horse for some one. Is for sale. No- 
tice "ad." in this paper. 



Joe Cuicello has six head at present. The two 
good race mares. Lady Inez 2:14 and Queen Derby 
2:11%, a five-year-old bay mare by Sidney Dillon, 
dam Ladywell 2:16 by Electioneer that has intense 
trotting speed, having stepped an eighth in :14%, 
a bay four-year-old colt by Owynex, son of Owyhee 
2:11, out of Atherine, dam of the great Copa de 
Oro 2:03%. This colt is a trotter and stepped a 
mile with limited training as a three-vear-old in 
2:24. 

Grace Zolock, the four-year-old daughter of Zo- 
lock and Grace Kaiser has filled out into a big, 
strong and handsome mare. Not having seen her 
since she was a two-year-old, I would not have 
known her. She surely ought to be one of the good 
Zolock pacers this year. A yearling by Bonnie 
Direct, dam by Guy Wilkes, completes Joe's pres- 
ent number. 



The first one I saw of "Senator" Hellman's bunch 
was Cruzados, one of the best bred sons of McKin- 
ney in the world, first dam Stamboulita 2:27 by 
Stamboul 2:07%, second dam Biscari, dam of eight, 
by Director 2:17, third dam Bicari, dam of six, by 
Harold, etc. 1 wouldn't be surprised if this fellow 
turned out to be another Carlokin. So far his 
opportunities* have been very limited. The next was 
Alconda Jay by Jay Bird. A whole column would be 
none too much space to say all that could be well said 
about this young horse, his breeding and prospects, 
so we will save it all for the Stallion Number, Feb- 
ruary 27. 

Berta Mc 2:08, champion trotter of the Pacific 
Coast. That's all she is. Big, sound and strong, 
she looks as if she had as many campaigns in her 
as her illustrious relative, Sweet Marie 2:02. 

Election Bells, bay stallion, six years old, by 
Monbelli 2:23%, dam Manzanita 2:16, ex-champion 
four-yepir-old trotter, has been a mile in 2:26. 

Cora, the fast bay pacing daughter of Del Coronada. 
the smallest and youngest filly that ever paced a 
mile In 2:08. Not three years old until Christmas 
day, 1908, yet three months before was only beaten 
an eyelash by Ray o' Light in 2:08%. 

Carrie S., black mare by Zombro, dam by Mon- 
tana Wilkes, trotter. 

Alma Mc, b. m., by McKinney, dam Mary A 2:30 
by Altamont 2:26%. This mare is a trotter, a full 
sister to Kinney Al 2:14%, and has been a mile in 
2:23. 

Happy, chestnut gelding, pacer, by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam Azrose, dam of Little Louise 2:17% by Azmoor 
2:20%, is a fast and smooth pacer. 

Zoedell, brown filly, three years old, pacer, by 
Zolock, dam Lovely Dell by Lovelace 2:20. 

Brown filly, two years old, trotter, by Kinney Lou 
2:07%. dam Electress Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes. 
This filly is a nice looker, is out of the dam of 
Lady Mowry 2:09% and the phenomenal trotting 
colt, Four Stockings. The "Senator" says she is 
just as good a prospect as her white legged full 
brother. We hope so. If she is she will do. 

Hal .1., brown colt, two years old, pacer, by Hal 
B. 2:04%, dam by Del Norte 2:08. 

Delia H., black yearling, pacer, full sister to 
Hal J. 

Ruby Light, bay filly, one year old. the most roy- 
ally bred one on the grounds. Sired by Aerolite 
(3) 2:11%, the wonderful son of the mighty Search- 
light 2:03%. Her dam is the greatest of great 
brood mares. Bertha by Alcantara. Bertha is the 
dam of four in 2:10. with two more that will beat 
that mark when given an opportunity, and Aerolite's 
dam has three that have raced better than 2:10 and 
another that with one season's work has trialed in 
2:11 

Baron Bowles (3) 2:25, bay horse; a splendid son 
of Baron Wilkes, Jr., and Susie May 2:18 by Dig- 
nus, sire of Johnny Agan 2:05%. 

The last but not the least of those in Mr. Hell- 
man's stables that we will mention is the magnifi- 
cent Knott McKinney. This six-year-old bay stallion 
is the equal in size, style and beauty of that grand 
horse, Washington McKinney. In gait and way of 
going, he is more like Charley D. 2:06%. He is 
owned by C. H. Williams of Palo Alto, has never 
had any track work but has a great turn of nat- 
ural speed and if he does not make an extremely 
fast and useful pacer I shall be disappointed. I 
have kown him since he was eight days old and 
shall watch his development with interest. 

W. T. McBride has four head, the best known one 
is Bonnie Antrim (2) 2:23%, champion two-year- 
old pacing gelding of 1908. Sired by Bonnie McK.. 
dam Vantrim by Antrim. He was bred by Thomas 
Ronan, discovered by A. P. Church, who bought 
him when a weanling from Mr. Ronan and sold 
him when a yearling to Mr. McBride after he had 
demonstrated that the "Deacon" had made no mis- 
take when he picked him out in the rough. 

Dawn o' Light is a good green pacing mare by 
Searchlight 2:0::%. dam Lildine by Boodle 2:12%. 
Last summer as a four-year-old this mare worked 
a mile in 2:12. 

Another good pacing prospect is a gelding, same 
age and by same sire out of a La Muscovita, dam 
of Yolanda 2:14 by Guy Wilkes. He is called Guv 



Light. Before being shifted to the lateral gait 
he trotted a mile in 2:25. The last number of this 
stable is John G. Lewis, chestnut colt, one year old, 
by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Palo Belle 2: 24%" by Palo 
Alto 2:08%. 



The first one Charlie De Ryder showed me was a 
beautiful bay filly, two years old by Star Pointer 
out of Francis 2:19. For elegance and finish this 
one is hard to beat, and as she stepped a half in 
1:11 as a yearling, can be considered a good speed 
prospect. She will be prepared for her two-year- 
old engageemnts. 

A black mare, six years old, by McKinney. dam 
by Bow Bells 2:19%, has been a mile in 2:25 on 
a trot. 

Sir Boreal, brown horse, by Boreal CI) 2:15%, 
dam by Baron Wilkes 2:18, next dam by Strathmore, 
is a green trotter Mr. Ryder brought from the East. 
He is sure a good bred one and as he has been a 
mole in 2:10, looks like he would do to go to the 
races. 

Jess McKinney is a bay mare by McKinney, out of 
a mare by Antinous 2:28%, son of Electioneer 125. 
1 have liked this one since she was a three-year-old, 
when the late Johnny Gordon worked her at San 
Jose. She has been a mile in 2:15. 

Grey, two years old, gelding by Lynwood W., sire 
of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, out of Alameda Maid by 
Eros 2:29%, is a classy looking youngster and a 
good prospective trotter, as is the black three-year- 
old colt, Dr. Jones by Capt. Jones, sire of Lady Jones. 

A bay gelding, pacer, by Seymour Wilkes 2:08%, 
dam by Gen. Benton, has been a half in 1:05%. 

The Star Pointer — Myrtha Whips yearling, whose 
recent sale for $500 is mentioned on another page, 
is one that ought to learn to pace fast some day. 
Star Pointer has been bred to few better race 
mares than Myrtha Whips 2:09 or better bred ones. 
Her first, second and third dams are all great brood 
mares and are by Contractor, Almont and Mam- 
brino Chief, the third dam being none other than 
the great Dolly, dam of Director 2:17, Czarina 2:21, 
Thorndale 2:22 and Onward 2:25%. 

The next four in De Ryder's string are all owned 
by Thos. Ronan. First, the five-year-old roan stal- 
lion Bodaker is a fast trotter that Mr. De Ryder 
worked a mile last spring in 2:11 and a half in 
1:02. He is by Antrim 4918, a sire of speed and 
race horse qualities of the first order, out of the in- 
bred Wilkes mare Birdie by Jay Bird, next dam Lady 
Lyle by Geo. Wilkes, next dam Dame Tansie by 
Daniel Lambert. If everything goes well with this 
fellow 1 would not be surprised if he proved as fast 
and as great a trotter as Mr. Ronan ever raised, 
not forgetting the great Anzella 2:06%. 

Another out of the grand old mare Birdie is a 
handsome roan filly by Bonnie McK. This one has 
just become a member of the DeRyder stable and 
has had no development, but my friend Church 
told me confidentially that she is an uncut diamond. 

The five-year-old bay mare Angeline by Antrim, 
dam by Meredith and the three-year-old colt Bird- 
eye by Birdman .full brother to Bodaker, are the 
other two owned by Mr. Rowan. 

Odd Mark is a five-year-old bay gelding by Sirius 
Mark and is a fast trotter. I timed him an eighth 
when a three-year-old in 15 seconds. 

The pacer Senator Clark 2:24% by Prodigal 2:16, 
is very fast. They will have to beat 2:10 some to 
win from him next season. 

A hay filly, three years old, by Sidney Dillon and 
owned by Fred Chase, is a nice going pacer. 

King Dingee is a six-year-old brown horse by 
Zombro out of Diavolo by Diablo. He is a fast trot- 
ter and has been a very unfortunate one but he is all 
right now and acting well. He is very liable to 
make the rail birds sit op and take notice. A two- 
year-old chestnut filly by Lynwood W. and a yearling 
colt by Star Pointer out of the fast pacing mare 
Gertie A., complete Mr. DeRyder's stable at pres- 
ent. 



Wm. Best, who has been training at Newman, 
Cal., the last year, has three good prospects he 
brought from there. A green pacing gelding by 
Hawthorne has been a mile in 2:11%. 

Derby Lass is a good looking black mare by Ar- 
ner 2:17 out of a mare by Chas. Derby 2:20. Her 
training has been limited but she has been a mile 
in 2:20 and Mr. Best thinks a lot of her. A nice 
looking five-year-old chestnut mare by a son of Dex- 
ter Prince is the other one. Mr. Best is something 
of a stranger in this part of the country but I 
know him to be a gentlemanly young man and an 
intelligent, careful trainer of horses and colts. 

Wm. DeRyder has a green trotting gelding that 
looks like a good one. He has been a mile in 2:12 
and a half in 1:03. He was sired by Knight — dam 
by Albert W. 2:20; wears the lightest of shoes and 
few boots. 

He also has a green pacing mare by Dictatus 2:17 
that has been a mile in 2:13 over a half mile track. 
She is a racy looking mare. 

A fine looking two-year-old black gelding by I>ecco 
2:09%, out of Lady Dwyer by Menlo 2:21; a two- 
year-old chestnut filly by Strathway 2:19. dam by 
Secretary, and a yearling colt by Star Pointer, dam 
by Roy Wilkes 2:06%, are all Will has at present. 



Harry Brown is still going on crutches as a result 
of an accident at Fresno last October. He is then 
fore unable to do more than feed the few that he 
has up. The black yearling filly by Arner 2:17, dam 
Grace Kohl by Nutwood Wilkes, next dam the great 
brood mare Lilly Langtry by Nephew, is an extra 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



good looking young thing as well as an extra well 
bred one. 



Charlie James has eleven head, mostly young 
things, nearly all owned by S. Christensen. 

A four-year-old by Stam B. 2:11, dam by Allie 
Wilkes 2:15; a two-year-old Star Pointer, out of same 
dam; a yearling by Star Pointer out of the dam of 
Charley D 2:06%, owned by J. C. Kirkpatrick; a two- 
year-old filly by Zolock, dam by Don Pedro (paced 
quarter in 38 seconds as a yearling). Liberty Song: 
five-year-old gelding by Liberty Chimes; two year 
old gelding by Kinney Lou 2:07%, dam Flora M. 2:16. 
(a smooth going pacer that is owned by Mr. Kirk- 
patrick); four yearlings by Bon Voyage out of mares 
by Simmons 2:28, Athadon, Allie Wilkes and Don 
Pedro, completes the list in this stable. 



Wm. Fry is jogging four owned bv Mr. .7. C. Kirk- 
patrick. They are the old campaigner John Caldwell 
2:08% that snowed that he was not a dead one this 
last season: Manuel, green pacer, that has been a 
mile in 2:12; a four-year-old filly by Sidney Dillon 
that has been a mile in 2:25 on a trot and Santa 
Rita Boy, a double gaited fellow by Diablo that has 
been in 2:12 and 2:14 at the pace and trot. 

H. Busing has seven head and in the black four- 
year-old horse Bonnie McKinney, has a magnificent 
piece of horseflesh, a fast trotter and a promising 
young sire, as is evidenced by the four two-year-olds 
by him in the same stable. 

His two-year-old son Bennie McKinney. Jr.. out 
of Amazonia by Jas. Madison 2:17, is one of the 
largest, best looking and best developed colts I ever 
saw for his age and they say he is a trotter. 

The three other two-year-olds by the same sire 
are all good lookers. 

The three-year-old black filly by Lecco 2:09% out 
of the dam of Bennie McKinnev is a large, elegant 
filly. 

Bonnie Searchlight, four-year-old colt by Search- 
light 2:03%, has recently been put to pacing and Mr. 
Busing is highly pleased with the way he takes to 
the lateral gait. 



Geo. Ramage has his fast but unfortunate Sidney 
Dillon trotter, Bert Arandale 2:19%, looking strong 
and good. George tells me that in the race at Bell- 
ingham. Wash., where he met with an accident, that 
this horse stepped the last half of the last heat of 
the race over the half mile track in 1:04, last 
three eighths in :44%, last eighth in :14%, win- 
ning the heat and race. Surely that is stepping 
some. 

George showed me a grand looking yearling by 
Bon Voyage out of Miss Logan 2:06% that belongs 
to Henry Dunlap. 



D. H. Starr, a new comer in Pleasanton, has two 
good ones in the green trotter Zomoak by Zombro, 
dam by Red Oak, that has worked in 2:18, and Belle 
N. 2:26 by Bonnie Direct 2:05%, dam Petrina by Pied- 
mont 2:17. This mare has trotted a mile in 2:08. 
These two trotters will be prepared for the Northern 
circuit. 



Few training stables in California or anywhere 
else contain the speed and breeding that is to be 
found in that of Sutherland and Chadbourne. If 
there was nothing else but those two magnificent 
sons of Searchlight, Aerolite and The Limit, it would 
be enough to be very proud of. 

Both these young pacers are looking as well as it 
is possible for them to. Space will not permit 
saying any more about them here. In the stable 
are three others out of the dam of Mona Wilkes 
and Aerolite. 

Moortrix (3) 2:14%, Leota, six-year-old mare by 
Diablo that worked in 2:11 last year and a slashing 
looking yearling by Star Pointer called Sirius 
Pointer. 

There is a full sister to The Limit, four years old 
that promises to be very fast and Bernice, six years 
old, by Owyhee 2:11, out of the same great dam, that 
showed a mile in 2:11 last year on a trot, and is 
booked for a record better than 2:10 this year. 

Grace R., bay mare by Demonio, has been a mile 
in 2:10; no record. 

Solano Boy 2:09%, a game race horse, pacer. 

Zoblack. a black colt, two years old, by Zolock, dam 
Madaline by Demonio, that strange to say is a square 
trotter. 

Bay colt, two years old, trotter by Palite (son of 
Nutwood Wilkes and Palita (2) 2:16 by Palo Alto 
2:08%), dam Lorna Doone by Bayswater Wilkes. 

Chestnut colt, 3, pacer by Demonio, dam Mamie 
Comet. 

Black colt, 3, trotter, by Lecco 2:09%, dam Ruth 
C, by Guide 2:16. 

Bay colt, 3, trotter, by Mendocino 2:19%, darn by 
Nutwood Wilkes, second dam by Director 2:17. The 
junior member of the firm showed me something 
which he was prouder of than any of the horses 
in the stable. It was a beautiful gold split-second 
watch with monogram, with the following inscription 
on the inside of the case: "From J. W. Marshall to 
Fred Chadbourne. Trainer of Mona Wilkes 2:03%, 
December 25, 1908." 



Thomas Ronan showed his good judgment when he 
went to Kentucky and bought the two sires, then 
unknown, Antrim and Meredith and took them to 
Washington to head his breeding farm there, and 
again when he bred a number of his best mares 
last spring to the great young trotter San Francisco 
2:07%, then unknown to the trotting world, now be- 
lieved by some to be a candidate for the stallion 



crown. At another time 1 will have more to say 
about tin? good ones, brood mares and young things 
that Air. Ronan owns. 

In liirdman. the full brother to the fast trotter 
Bodaker, he has a young stud that gives promise 
of making a high class sire. 

I did not have time to get across to Mr. Kirkpat- 
rick's place to see the great race horse Charley D. 
2:06%, or up to Mr. C. L. Griffith's to see what he 
has. Will look them up next time. 

o 

PRAISE FOR OLIVER TODD AND HIS OWNER. 



If there is ever a time I do love to "toot" it is 
over an enterprising man and a prospective young 
horse. As I arrived in San Francisco yesterday 1 
called at the Ferry news stand and procured the 
Christmas number of the Breeder and Sportsman. 
Among the many interesting articles was Mr. Bo.ut- 
well Dunlap's on Kate Hamilton (dam of Zomalta) 
and the long distance old time trotter Controller. 
The last named called me back to those good old 
days and to pleasant recollections of my esteemed 
friend Mr. Henry White, the gentleman who owned 
and drove that game horse. I have not seen Mr. 
White since the earthquake of 1906 and do not know, 
at this date, his city address, but was informed some 
months ago that he passed safely through the great 
calamity. Mr. White is now at a good old age but 
his memory is still good and as he was well versed 
on the men and horses of olden days, no doubt 
knows all about Controller's lineage. For years back, 
up to the time of the earthquake, I saw much of 
Mr. White, and it was his delight to talk over old 
times and the men and horses that have passed. I 
must try and hunt, him up for if I ever had a true 
friend in my life I am confident that Mr. White was 
one that I could rely upon at all times. 

It gave me great joy to learn through your jour- 
nal that Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick has secured a high 
bred son of Todd 2:14%, and that he is probably 
to be added to the list of other high bred young- 
sters now owned in California. All the California 
breeders of light harness horses should congratulate 
themselves as well as Mr. K. on the fact that he is 
to return to this state with such a high bred young- 
ster as Oliver Todd. The taking of Washington 
McKinney to Missouri is a great gain to that State, 
and the bringing of Oliver Todd here is a great 
gain to California. 

As I looked over the pedigree of Oliver Todd I 
noted that I not only am acquainted with his an- 
cestors in the first three generations, but that I have 
seen over 75 per cent of them. As they were, as 
a rule, good individuals, Oliver Todd himself must 
be nearly a perfect young horse, and a prospective 
all around trotter and sire of early speed as well. 

I have been struggling for my life the last four or 
five years to keep my head above low water mark, 
and to get together enough to secure two or three 
youngsters of the blood of Bingen, Moko, Axworthy 
and Peter the Great — the last named one of the great- 
est trotters of his age and sex the country has yet 
produced, judging by the easy manner in which he 
disposed of his opponents in the Kentucky Futurity 
in the fall of 1898. Over a rough, sticky track, way 
out on the outside of the track, the easy style in 
which he won the third heat and the race in 2:12%, 
impressed me then that he was a 2:09 or better 
trotter that day, and I have never to this day changed 
that opinion. Take all the circumstances in which 
that colt was placed before the bell had rung, 
bad weather, postponements from day to day on 
account of snow, rain, etc., I can't figure otherwise 
but Peter the Great was one of the very best trot- 
ting race horse colts America has yet produced. As 
a sire he has proven himself one of the first rank. 

Mr. Kilpatrick has prov-en by his management 
of Washington McKinney that a man or horse 
possessing merit must be given an opportunity if they 
are to be brought to the front. He brought Washing- 
ton McKinney from "under a bushel" and many now 
see the merits of this great horse that were form- 
erly hidden. This has been the case of many other 
great producing sires whose merits would never 
have been known but for some such enterprising, 
dashing far-sighted man. 

No small breeder or poor man can afford now-a- 
days to patronize a stallion whose owner depends 
entirely upon his patrons to bring the produce of 
his horse to the front. Any horse to be profitable 
to an owner must be kept before the public through 
the performances of his produce, and unless this is 
done those in search of good things will in a short 
time forget that he or his horse were ever upon 
this earth. What such men as Messrs. Kilpatrick, 
Durfee and Williams and the late Messrs. Stan- 
ford, Hamlin, Forbes, Corbett, Rose, Salisbury and 
Valensin have done with their horses fully demon- 
strates that a man of small means must, for the good 
of his ledger account, keep with the moving tide of 
horse booms. 

If my small creditors will have a little more 
patience so that I can come out in the open, and I 
should be fortunate enough to secure the use of one 
or two mares that I now have in mind, I will not 
wait for Oliver Todd to secure a record, or wait until 
he is a producing sire, nor tell his managers what 
a great mare I have and how she will add to his 
Dame and fame, but I will lead her to that high 
bred colt and in due time pay my bill for his ser- 
vices. 

I will again congratulate Mr. Kilpatrick on his 
good judgement in securing such a royally bred 
young horse, with the blood lines that are just now 
needed in California. Our breeders will be lucky if 
they have the chance to send their mares to this 
colt. Please remember that all great, sires of speed 



do not produce trotting futurity winners, but the 
blood in Oliver Todd does. 

Nine years ago 1 thought I could see merit in the 
union of the blood of Axtell 2:12 and Simmons 2:2S, 
combined with oilier useful and producing blood. 
Poor ownership and lack of opportunity prevented 
the promising young horse Kxcel from proving my 
theory, yet 1 never lost faith in the mixture which 
is now very, very scarce. This season with a rush 
came Hamburg Belle 2:04%, queen of racing mares, 
to prove to me again t hat producing blood, developed 
and undeveloped, will tell the truth if given an op- 
portunity. Yours, 

SAMUEL GAMBLE, V. S. 

San Francisco, Dec. 28, 1908. 

o 

DEATH OF PAT FARRELL. 



Another of Californias pioneer horsemen has 
crossed over to the other side. On the first day of 
the year Patrick Farrell, identified with the Amer- 
ican trotter since the days of Lady Suffolk, first 
trotter to beat 2:30, breathed his last at his home, 
an old time road house on San Francisco's first 
speedway, the Point Lobos road. For the past few 
years Pat Farrel had been confined to his house 
the greater part of the time, but up to about four 
years ago he was an active trainer and always 
had in his stalls several good roadsters in training 
for different owners. He was then a straight, tall, 
vigorous man of 70 years, his eye as keen and his 
hand as steady as when a mere boy he took care 
of horses and learned how to train them while in 
the employ of Hiram Woodruff, America's first great 
trainer. 

Patrick Farrell was born in County Dublin, Ire- 
land, in March, 1835, and came to America when but 
ten years of age, the same year that Lady Suf- 
folk trotted a mile in 2:29%, astounding the world. 
For a few months young Farrell attended school on 
the outskirts of Brooklyn, N. Y., but horses were 
his hobby and he said goodbye to books and en- 
tered the employ of Hiram Woodruff. He worked 
for the great reinsman until 1857 when he came 
to California by way of Panama. He first entered 
the employ of Mr. Easton, proprietor of the Black 
Hawk Farm at San Mateo, where he stayed three 
years and then hired out to E. H. Parker, who 
owned the mare California Damsel, that was trained 
and driven by Johnny Crooks. When the mare was 
taken east to meet the best trotters of the day 
Farrell was her chief caretaker. Returning to Cal- 
ifornia he was placed in charge of the track at San 
Mateo. In 1868 he opened the Turf House on Point 
Lobos road and resided there until the day of his 
death. Here he stabled and trained the sorrel pacer 
Longfellow 2:19%, owned by Chase & Bowley and 
raced him all over the State. Farrell always 
claimed that Longfellow was the greatest and fastest 
pacer he ever drove; and well he might make the 
claim as he drove that horse in twenty-four races and 
lost but two, while Longfellow's two mile record of 
4:47% has been beaten less than two seconds, his 
three mile record of 7:53 to wagon is still the best 
for that distance and his five mile record of 14:15 
to wagon was made in a race where Farrell, who 
was driving, weighed 180 pounds. 

Vanderlynn 2:21 owned by W. W. Stowe and named 
for a son of the Southern Pacific's late land law- 
yer, was the next prominent horse that Farrell 
trained and he won many races with him. 

The last horse of any note that he campaigned 
was the gray ghost Marin Jr. 2:13, owned by the 
late Dick Carroll of San Francisco. After win- 
ning every race he started in but one, (in which 
Farrell was instructed not to win), Marin Jr. was 
sold to Monroe Salisbury and William Bradbury, but 
taken east failed to come up to expectations. 

When Pat Farrell went to live at the Turf House, 
the Point Lobos road was the scene of daily brushes 
between the many fast pacers and trotters owned by 
the road drivers of San Francisco, and during the 
next ten years — the "Bonanza Days" — no price was 
too great for the mining kings of the Coast to pay 
for one or a pair that could show all the others the 
way. But the times changed, the opening of fine 
roads through Golden Gate Park put Point Lobos 
road off the line of travel and the Turf House was 
seldom visited except by the few old time horse- 
men who had known Pat Farrell in early days and 
who enjoyed his cheery greetings and many amus- 
ing reminescences told with choice brogue that added 
zest to the tales of by-gone days. 

Pat Farrell is gone, but in the minds of the old 
brigade of road drivers the mention of his name will 
cause pleasant reflections so long as memory lasts. 
His funeral took place Monday last and was largely 
attended. He leaves a wife and several brothers 
and sisters to mourn his loss. 

o 

SANTA MARIA RACES. 



There were three races at the Santa Maria hack 
on Christmas Day. the results being as follows: 

Class A — Elsie Marie, driven by Frank Trainor, 
won two heats, best time 2:19. Black Bart also 
started. 

Class B — Honis Bismark. driven by Ed. Hamilton, 
won first and third heats in 2:28% and 2:21%; Lo- 
retta F., driven by Harry Howard, won second 
heat in 2:22. 

Class C — Miss Oommet, driven by W. S. Lierly, 
won first and third heats in 2:26 and 2:28; Anona. 
driven by Hamilton, won second beat in 2:26. Hobby 
H. was third and Thos. Barrett fourth. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



j NOTES AND NEWS | 

Ten papers for a year for $1.50. Read all about it 
in our advertising columns. 

Mr. E. O. Ingram, of Los Angeles, has sold his 
free-for-all matinee pacer Dewey, to John Nickerson 
of that city. 



A Southern California circuit will be formed by the 
associations in San Diego, Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino and Santa Ana, to give meetings in June 
and July. 

The Owl Drug Company advertises Tobacco Dust 
for sale. This is one of the safest and best reme- 
dies for lice on horses, poultry, etc., and is inex- 
pensive. See advertisement. 

.1. E. Montgomery, of Davis, California, has a 
couple of Percheron-Norman stud colts that he wants 
to sell. They are a black and a bay and high grade 
youngsters. See advertisement. 



"Speedway," as the new Chico mile track is called, 
had issued a neat advertising card, setting forth the 
advantages of that track as a place to train horses. 
I, j- caliccl Hm- best equipped mile track in tin- Stair. 



The warm weather of the past week has started 
the grass all over California and the State will soon 
have a carpet of green from one end to the other. 
Pasturage will be good by the middle of February 
in all sections. 



Oscar Hartnagle, the leading veterinarian of Seat- 
tle, who trained and drove the gray trotter Henry 
Gray 2:14% by Zombro through a very successful 
campaign last summer, will be out with him again 
this year and will nominate him in all the good 
stakes to which he is eligible on the Pacific Coast 
circuit. The gray is in fine shape and will reduce 
his record materially with ordinary luck. 



The California Mutual Live Stock Insurance Asso- 
ciation has now moved and established its chief 
offices at 270-271 and 272 Bacon Building, Twelfth 
street, near Broadway, Oakland, finding this the most 
convenient center for its rapidly increasing business 
among the stock raisers and horse breeders through- 
out California and the neighboring States. The chief 
officers of the association are M. L. Wright, presi- 
dent, and J. A. Wright, secretary. 



John J. Doyle, one of the best known horse dealers 
and auctioneers in San Francisco, died very suddenly 
at his home on Sunday last from heart disease. Mr. 
Doyle was highly thought of by all who knew him, and 
was a very successful business man. He was ar- 
ranging to open a new salesyard this month. He was 
a native of Massachusetts and leaves a devoted wife 
two sons and a daughter to mourn his loss. He was 
53 years of age. 



Jos. McCabe, Supervisor of Bisbee, Cochise County, 
Arizona, recently purchased from W. N. Tiffany the 
four year old stallion Senator Tirzah by Senator L. 
2:23%, four mile trotting champion, dam by Fred 
Schofield 21681, son of Onward, second dam by Tom 
Sawyer .1974, son of Mambrino Patchen 58. Senator 
Tirzah is a fine looking young horse, and has won 
money at the Territorial Fair in races every year 
since he was first started as a yearling. 



The Arabian stallions owned by El Rancho de las 
Rosas at Alma, Santa Clara county, are advertised 
to stand this season at that rancho for a fee of $50. 
These horses attracted much attention at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair last year and were awarded a spec- 
ial premium. By addressing the owners, breeders 
who are interested in this stock will be furnished full 
particulars of the breeding of these stallions and 
much interesting literature giving their romantic 
history. 



Among the well bred stallions that will be in the 
stud at Fresno this spring is Milton Gear 2:16%, a 
horse that has raced well over the Southern Cali- 
fornia tracks during recent years. He is a very 
strongly bred horse, being by Harry Gear 25382 (of 
the fast pacer Harry Logan 2:12%), out of Lulu N. by 
Dawn 2:18%, son of Nutwood 2:18%, second dam 
Alice by Brown's McClellan. Milton Gear will make 
the season of 1909 at the Fresno Fair Grounds in 
charge of his owner, J. Depoister. The service fee 
will be $25 for the season with the usual return fee. 



In sending his payment January 2d on Zulu Belle 
2:24%, the filly he has entered in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity No. 6, Will Durfee says she is a good filly 
and he expects to win the stake with her. Zulu Belle 
is by Petigru 2:10%, dam Johanna Treat, the dam 
of Del Coronado 2:09% and others. She took her 
record last November at the Phoenix meeting. Mr. 
Durfee adds that his yearlings by Del Coronado are 
the finest lot he has ever owned and there should 
be at least one extra good one among them. He 
thinks them all a little extra, but his favorite is the 
one from the dam of Jupiter B. 2:12, although the 
champion lot trotter is a colt from Sappho and he 
may be it. The filly from Bttblto is the handsomest 
filly in the State. 



At the Los Angeles track last Saturday the pacer 
Siegfried by Silver Coin 2:10 worked out in 2:09%, 
the trotter Richie Baron made a mile in 2:15% and 
repeated in 2:14%, and the trotter Zombretta by 
Zombro went a mile in 2:15%. 



Bert Webster was driving a bay colt about the 
Pleasanton track last week hitched to a cart that 
made the baby look like a toy horse. The colt is 
only about six months old but took to the pacing gait 
like a duck to water, which is not surprising, how- 
ever, when its breeding is known, as it is by Star 
Pointer out of Gertie A., that whirlwind pacer by 
Diablo 2:09% that Victor Verhilac used to own, but 
has recently sold to Chas. De Ryder. Gertie A. could 
pace a quarter in 29 seconds "just as easy," but met 
with an accident and was unable to race. It is no 
wonder that De Ryder bought the mare after seeing 
the colt pull that cart about the track. 



Budd Doble has concluded to allow his grand three- 
year-old colt Kinney de Lopez to serve a few choice 
mares this spring. This colt is a handsome chestnut, 
and a very fast trotter. He is by Kinney Lou 2:07%, 
dam the registered mare Betsey Direct (sister in 
blood to Directly 2:03%). by Direct 2:05%, second 
dam Kate Chapman (dam of Campaigner 2:26%) 
by Naubuc 504, third dam Kitty Patchen by Geo. 
M. Patchen Jr. 31, fourth dam by Vick's Ethan Allen. 
Kinney de Lopez is one of the best bred colts in 
California and as he is a magnificent individual and 
very fast, he has every qualification for a sire and 
may be expected to produce early and extreme 
speed. 



It looks as if Dr. F. A. Ramsey of Riverside, made 
a good bargain when he purchased the pacer Mac 
O. D. 2:11% by Zolock. At the Christmas matinee at 
Riverside, he drove Mac O. D. a mile in 2:10% 
without the hobbles, and the Doctor thinks the 
horse can pace a mile better than 2:09 without 
straps. Mac O. D. should be a good horse in the 2:12 
class this year. Don Reginaldo 2:15% as a three 
year old, is doing fine, but will probably not be out 
as a four year old, but kept over to race in his five 
year old form. Dr. Ramsey suffered a severe loss 
the other day when his mare May N. by McKinney 
had one of her hind legs nearly cut off in a barb wire 
fence and had to be shot. She was bred to Bon 
Voyage last year, and Dr. Ramsey now has a nom- 
ination in the Pacific Breeders Futurity for sale. 



Mr. F. H. Holloway, manager of the Hemet Livery 
Stables at Hemet, Cal., and of the Hemet and 
Idyllwild Stage Line, writes us that a training track 
is to be built at that place this winter and he ex- 
pects quite a number of the get of their fast stallion. 
Geo. W. McKinney 2:14%, will be trained there in the 
spring. Geo. McKinney is the sire of Silver Dick 
2:09%, Nealy W. 2:27, Andy McKinney 2:28%, 
Walter J. 2:28% and Honest John with a matinee 
record of 2:21%, pacing. Mr. Holloway's company 
has several good prospects by this horse, mostly 
two and three year olds that they expect to enter 
the list during the coming season. They also have 
a filly by Sterling McKinney 2:06% and two colts 
by Kinney Lou 2:07% that look very promising. Mr. 
Holloway states that there is at Hemet a three-year- 
old filly by Geo. W. McKinney 2:14% out of Anne 
Boleyn, the dam of Velox 2:09%, that is "the 
candy." 



One of the most improved horses we have seen 
for some time is the stallion King Dingee. which 
Chas. DeRyder purchased at Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick's 
dispersal sale last October. We saw Mr. DeRyder 
driving him on the Pleasanton track last Saturday 
to a speed cart and King Dingee was acting like a 
real trotter. De Ryder thinks he has a 2:10 trot- 
ter in him sure. King Dingee is one of the best 
bred horses in California as he is by Zombro 2:11. 
(son of McKinney and sire of eight in 2:10). his dam 
is by the great Diablo 2:09%, sire of seven in 2:10, 
his second dam Lilly Langtry, dam of Ed. B. Young 
2:11%, Dudley 2:14, etc., by Nephew 1220, sire of 
the dam of Eleata 2:08%, etc., third dam Miss 
Trahern by Gen. McClelland 143, and fourth dam 
Belle Mahone by the famous champion three mile 
runner Norfolk. Since Mr. DeRyder has owned King 
Dingee the horse has improved greatly in looks and 
manners, and is now one of the most pleasant driv- 
ers on the Pleasanton track, and really looks and 
acts like a great prospect. 



Ed Parker, acting for Mrs. Geo. A. Davis of 
Pleasanton, has sold to an Eastern gentleman the 
filly Myrtha Pointer by Star Pointer 1:59%, dam 
Myrtha Whips 2:09 by Whips (son of Electioneer 
and sire of Azote 2:04%), second dam Myrtha (dam 
of Myrtha Whips 2:09 and Azmont 2:22%, by 
Contractor 1084 (son of Azax 40, he by Hambleton- 
ian 10) ) third dam McCa, dam of Quality 2:13% and 
Manille 2:29%, and grandam of four) by Almont 33, 
fourth dam the great broodmare Dolly, (dam of Di- 
rector 2:17, Onward 2:25%, Czarina 2:21 and 
Thorndale 2:22%) by Mambrino Chief 11. This is 
one of the best bred ones that Star Pointer ever 
sired and although less than nine months old at 
this writing, is one of the handsomest fillies at the 
Pleasanton track. The price paid for her by her 
new owner was $500 cash, and the filly is in the hands 
of Chas. De Ryder, who will train for her stake en- 
gagements of 1910 and 1911. The get of Star 
Pointer that have been sold show that he has been 
a profitable horse for the California breeders who 
have .patronized him. About a dozen of his get have 
changed hands here as weanlings or yearlings and 
$360 is the lowest price yet paid for one. 



THE DAMS OF VELOX AND KID WILKES. 



In the Breeder and Sportsman of December 19th 
last, we gave the pedigree of Anne Boleyn, dam of 
Velox 2:09% as furnished us by her breeder, Robert 
T. Curtis, whose letter stated that she was by Bal- 
boa, thoroughbred, second dam Gray Annie by Ro- 
mero 2:19%, third dam Gretchen. 

In the article then printed we surmised that Mr. 
Curtis had inadvertently placed Gretchen, who was 
the dam of Romero, in the wrong position in the 
tabulation, and a recent letter from Mr. Curtis shows 
that our surmise was correct. 

Velox was bred by Charles H. Thomas and his 
pedigree is as follows: 

Sire. Zolock 2:05%. 

First dam, Anne Boleyn by Balboa, son of Norfolk 
and Maggie Dale by Owen Dale. 

Second dam, Gray Annie by Romero 2:19%, son of 
A. W. Richmond and Gretchen by Mambrino Pilot 
29. 

Third dam, Little Sally by son of Williamson's 
Belmont. 

Fourth dam, Mad Sally by Rifleman. 

Mr. Curtis adds: "I bred Anne Boleyn and Gray 
Annie. I bought Little Sally from Charles Durfee 
at one year of age; he raced Mad Sally back in 
1873-1874. Little Sally was the dam of Oliver Twist, 
a good race horse. Anne Boleyn is the dam of Bur- 
ben — he was a good race horse. I sold Gray Annie 
to Hancock Johnson with a sorrel filly at her side. 
This filly was sired by Balboa, making her a full 
sister to Anne Boleyn. The filly was sold by John- 
son to a man named Kirkpatrick, who sold her to 
a man in Riverside by the name of Stewart, and 
they claim she is the dam of Kid Wilkes, who trot- 
ted over the San Bernardino track on Christmas 
Day in 2:12% and 2:10%." 



The above is most interesting to those who study 
the pedigrees of trotters and pacers, and much of 
interest can be added to it by Mr. Durfee, who, 
Mr. Curtis states, raced Mad Sally. We can find 
no record of this mare in the thoroughbred regis- 
ter, nor of Oliver Twist, but as so few of the early 
California horses were registered, and our records 
of the California races prior to 1882 were all de- 
stroyed in the fire of 1906, perhaps Mr. Durfee can 
furnish us with some of the data and will remember 
what son of Williamson's Belmont was the sire of 
Little Sally. If the breeding of the dams of Velox 
and Kid Wilkes as given by Mr. Curtis is correct, 
and we see no reason to doubt his statements, then 
the thoroughbred blood in those mares was close up 
and in large quantities. 

o 

KINNEY ROSE AT CHICO. 



The fast trotting and handsome son of the great 
McKinney, Kinney Rose, (trial 2:13%), will be kept 
at the Chico race track for the season of 1909, and 
will serve mares at the moderate fee of $35 for the 
season with return privilege should mares not prove 
with foal. Kinney Rose is a dark bay horse, stand- 
ing just under 16 hands, and weighs 1,200 pounds. 
He has been trained and raced and showed great 
speed, but met the fastest horses on the circuit the 
year he was raced, and while he got no record was 
a good money winner, being second in several hard 
fought heats where the time was from 2:13% to 2:17. 
He is a grandly bred horse. His dam Golden Rose 
by Falrose produced the unfortunate but phenom- 
enal colt Renown, that met, with an accident in his 
first race and died soon after. Falrose, the sire of 
Golden Rose is a sire of a 2:10 performer and his 
get are noted for size and handsome proportions 
as well as speed. The second dam of Kinney Rose 
is Lady Harper by Alaska, son of Electioneer, the 
third dam by Algona, sire of Flying Jib 2:04 and 
fourth dam by Odd Fellow, thoroughbred. 

Kinney Rose was bred to a couple of mares in 
1906, and his first crop consists of but two colts 
which are now coming two-years-old. Both can 
show a 2:40 gait with but limited handling and one 
of them won the yearling stake at Woodland last 
fall trotting his heats in 2:50 and 2:51 after being 
handled but seven weeks. This same colt was 
driven a mile in -:42 on the Woodland track in 
November. 

Kinney Rose being a handsome horse, a well bred 
one, and a fast trotter, as well as a demonstrated 
sire of speed, should be well patronized by the breed- 
ers of the Sacramento Valley who desire to improve 
their trotting stock. 

o 

Tin: HORSE'S V ULVE 

at the present time is greater than ever in all the cen- 
tury. An owner cannot afford any loss of Its time or 
Strength. The prudent part is to guard against colds, 
the Influenzae. BUCh as distemper, pinkeye, shipping 
fever, heaves, etc.. by giving the horse twice a week 
a tonic of Craft's Distemper and Cough Cure, the 
liquid, which is mixed with the feed with little trouble. 
Druggists should supply it. If not furnished, the 
reader should write direct to the manufacturers (who 
will 3upply It at regular rate, 50 cents and $1 per bot- 
tle, prepaid). The Wells Medicine Co.. 13 Third St., 
Lafayette, Indiana. 

o 

-A MAKVRI.OI S CI RE." 



Mr. E. E. Winne of Waterloo, N. Y. writes: "Un- 
closed find $1.00 for bottle of Quinn s Ointment. About 
three years ago I had a valuable three-year-old colt 
that sprung two large splints, one on the inside of 
each foreleg. Poi a year I tried all remedies. Even 
the best veterinarians experimented, till the legs got in 
bad shape. Saw Quinn'S Ointment advertised secured 
a bottle, used according to directions, and in three 
months' time bis legs were as clean as your hand." 
For Curbs, Splints, Spavins. Windpuffs and all blem- 
ishes, use yuinn's Ointment. If cannot obtain from 
Druggist, address W. B. KDDY & CO.. Whitehall, 
N. Y. Price, $1.00, delivered. 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE ORLOFF. 



Recently while in this country Max Schlessinger 
of Vienna said: "Russia produces the only breed of 
horses that know nothing but trot, as the American 
trotter is educated to that gait." He said that in 
Russia the Orloff breed of horses are of good size 
and excellent conformation and it is rare when one 
can be found that without training is unable to trot 
miles right at 2:40 or better, even hitched to a cab 
and other heavy vehicles. Furthermore, that while 
several Americans, including Harry Devereux of 
Cleveland, are entered with their horses in the Inter- 
national Derby to be decided at St. Petersburg, still 
he has no idea that the rich event will be won by a 
horse owned or bred on this side of the water. The 
winner of the race will in his mind be a native Orloff, 
as when the stake will have been concluded it will 
be found that the time will be right In 2:12, or better. 

Mr. Schlessinger has attended trotting races in 
every country where the harness horse is recognized ; 
having, with his brother Isador, shipped so many 
from this country to Austria he is particularly inter- 
ested in our method of racing. That we have faults 
he freely admits. In the first place he does not 
believe in the best three heats in five plan of deciding 
races, declaring the practice ruins good horses by 
knocking them out quickly. Two heats in three, or 
the dash plan of three heats, each heat a race, being 
his preference. 

Mr. Schlessinger says betting is all right, but it 
should be kept entirely in control for the good of the 
sport. The racing and improvement of the trotter 
must be first considered, and to have the trotting 
turf advance in popularity the betting end must be 
kept in its proper place. 

He says that one of the best stallions ever sent 
to Austria was E. L. Robinson, the son of Epaulet, 
that George Scatterwood raced several seasons over 
New England tracks. Five out of the last eight 
Austrian derbys have been won by the get of Robin- 
son. Considering this as remarkable, yet it has been 
noticed that the sons and daughters of E. L. Robin- 
son either are very fast or they can not go a lick 
on earth, there being no half-way grade of trotters 
by him. Onward Silver, the Austrians believe, will 
prove a great sire, though he is now standing in 
Russia. His daughter, Spanish Queen, has this year 
on the American turf accomplished a lot in booming 
her sire with the foreigners. In shipping horses 
from America the cost, with the duty, from New 
York to Hamburg, amounts to $250 on each horse. 
In their stable in Vienna, the Messrs. Schlessinger 
have constantly on hand in the neighborhood of a 
couple of hundred trotters. There are no auction 
sales over there, such as we have annually in New 
York, Boston, etc., all of the sales being made to 
personal customers. 

o 

HORSE STEALING IN NEW YORK. 



An hour or two before last Tuesday's auction op- 
ened at Van Tassell & Kearney's a man walked into 
the office and said that he wished to enter his horse 
in the sale. Now, long experience has proved to the 
firm that when a horse is entered only a few hours 
before he is to be sold it is the course of prudence 
to inquire into the antecedents of both horse and 
consignor, and the latter was subjected to a sharp 
cross-examination by William Depot, who happened 
to take the entry. The moment the man went away 
Mr. Depot said to his assistants: "Boys, look out for a 
stolen horse in the sale today. That man has either 
stolen one or is going to steal one and try to sell 
him here this afternoon." 

Two hours later the man reappeared, leading a 
horse in harness unattached to any vehicle. This 
circumstance increased the suspicions of the firm, 
and, putting off the selling of the animal on the 
ground that his turn had not yet come, a little in- 
quiry around the neighborhood revealed the fact 
that the seller had abandoned his wagon on the 
streets a few blocks away. On the wagon was 
painted the name "Everett E. Wheeler, 396 Berry 
street, Brooklyn." As soon as they discovered this 
Van Tassell & Kearney communicated with Mr. 
Wheeler by telephone, and in less than an hour he 
and his foreman, who had hired out the rig to a 
stranger, were in Thirteenth street at the auction 
sale. To make the case complete the horse was then 
put up and sold, the seller standing by and represent- 
ing it as his property. The moment the animal was 
struck off to Mr. Wheeler's bid, Van Tassell & 
Kearney's special policeman tapped the surprised 
thief on the shoulder and took him into custody. He 
confessed on the spot and on Wednesday was held 
to await the action of the Grand Jury. For alert, 
effective, snapshot detective work Mr. Depot's effort 
was complimented at the police station as decidedly 
clever and all his friends are now addressing him 
as "Mr. Sherlock Holmes." — Herald. 

o 

W. R. Jacobs, the well known Stockton attor- 
ney and Democratic orator, owns a very handsome 
five-year-old stallion by McKinney 2:11%, dam Hat 
tie Hero by Live Oak Hero 28369 (sire of J .J. 
2:12%, sire of Lillian R. 2:04%). second dam by 
Dexter Prince. This young horse is a very prom- 
ising trotter as are all of Hattie Hero's produce, 
and she herself is better than a 2:20 trotter. Mr. 
Jacobs owns a stallion by Zombro 2:11 from Hattie 
Hero that was foundered last year and is now turned 
out with small hopes of ever getting over the ail- 
ment. This horse was beyond question one of the 
handsomest horses in California before he was in- 
jured. 



ABOUT ROADS AND ROAD MAKING. 



Logan Waller Page, director of the office of public 
roads of the United States Department of Agriculture, 
who was named by President Roosevelt as bead of 
the American Commission to the recent International 
Roads Congress at Paris, returned to Washington, 
firm in the belief that in some of the more scientific 
branches of highway construction the United States 
has nothing to learn from the older nations, though 
he was willing to concede that those countries sur- 
pass this to an amazing degree in the percentage 
of improved road mileage and in the jealous care 
with which their splendid highways are maintained. 

Among the many things which especially impressed 
Mr. Page during his European trip were the meth- 
ods for regulating automobile traffic in Prance and 
England ; the belief of a majority of the delegates 
to the Roads Congress that the automobile running 
at average speed is not detrimental to highways; the 
splendor of French hospitality; the discovery that 
many miles of very satisfactory highways in England 
have been constructed by mixing limestone and gran-, 
ite after the methods set forth in publications is- 
sued through the United States office of public roads, 
and the amusing discussion now being carried on by 
English automobilists against horse traffic in city 
streets and upon surburban highways. 

It is his belief that from the Congress itself at least 
one big result will flow and credit for that must go 
to America. On a suggestion by Mr. Page it was de- 
termined to create an International Bureau of Roads, 
similar in some respects to the International Bureau 
of Navigation. This body will consist of two or more 
delegates from each of the 29 governments repre- 
sented at the Congress. Its purpose will be the col- 
lecting of all possible information on road work, 
the passing on it by a committee of experts, and its 
distribution throughout the world. 

The ultimate benefits of so far-reaching a move 
can not now be estimated, but the world will some 
day carry a heavy debt of gratitude to the govern- 
ment whose highway representatives conceived the 
thought of such a bureau, and brought its support to 
the delegates of every civilized country on the globe. 

Credit must go to Mr. Page for the proposed 
erection of a memorial to M. Tresauget, the great 
French highway engineer, who was the originator of 
the modern French system of road maintenance and 
who began the building of the incomparable system 
of highways that has made France famous as a 
road-building nation. The resolution to that effect 
was introduced by Mr. Page and unanimously 
adopted: the Secretary-General being empowered to 
receive contributions with which to carry out its 
provisions. 

Asked what plans France had made for the vis- 
itors, Mr. Page said that he had been amazed at 
the manner in which the republic had planned for 
the comfort and the entertainment of the delegates. 

Among the functions was an elaborate reception at 
the Elysee Palace where the national delegates 
were received by President Fallieres. The sessions 
of the Congress were held in a vast auditorium at 
the Sorbonne; the various sections meeting in rooms 
especialiy furnished for their comfort and conven- 
ience the Salles du Jeu de Paume in a corner of the 
beautiful garden of the Tuileries. 

Besides the official reception at Elysee Palace there 
was a special theatrical entertainment given at which 
a famous French actress recited a poem specially 
written for the occasion; a reception at the palace 
of the minister of public works; another at the mag- 
nificent Hotel de Ville; side excursions to Fontaine- 
bleau and Nice, and a luncheon at the beautiful pal- 
ace at Versailles. 

This latter function was of especial interest to 
many Americans because -of the historical associa- 
tions lingering about the magnificent palace. The 
luncheon was served in the superb orange room, 
and when the delegates, to the number of over 750 
had taken seats, the fountains which form the great 
decorative features of the superb apartments were 
set playing, a tribute by France to the visitors, for it 
is only on rare occasions that the water is turned 
into this chain of basins. 

At the reception at the Hotel de Ville the visitors 
were also treated to scenes of splendor foreign to 
American ideas of simplicity. A regiment of the 
picturesquely uniformed Chasseurs of the French 
Army were detailed to stand at attention, one on 
either end of every step of the grand marble stair- 
case down which the delegates passed; and thence 
in double rows to the state dining rooms and grand 
salons. Gratifying and impressive as were these ex- 
amples of almost royal hospitality, the chairman 
of the American delegation found more of interest 
in the perfection of the system of road* with which 
the republic is provided, and in the systematic 
method of maintaining them to the highest degree of 
efficiency. He was told that on the magnificent road 
leading from Paris to Versailles 5,000 automobiles 
pass either way on each fine day, but he noted that 
it was in such perfect condition that it was practi- 
cally as dustless as the carefully swept asphalt 
street of a large city. 

No better macadam roads are built in France than 
can be and are built in this country; but the main- 
taining of these roads is attended to with the utmost 
care, and for that reason the highways are invariably 
in such condition that they excite the envy of Ameri- 
can visitors. 

Prior to his arrival at Paris, Mr. Page spent some 
days in England in the company of some of the fa- 
mous highway engineers of the Empire, examining 
roads through out England. It is his belief that 
England arrived as near to the solution of the dust- 
less roads — the present day problem of all highway 



engineers — as any nation. Her engineers have 
given the use of bituminous materials for spraying 
macadam roads the utmost, thought and care. Spray- 
ing highways with such materials after science hits 
been called to the aid of the highway builder has a 
tendency to preserve the solidity of the roads and 
prevent the formation of dust ; and England has made 
such progress in this branch of road study that many 
miles of surburban roads are as free from the dis- 
ease-breeding dust nuisance as the best kept streets 
of the principal cities of the world. 

So firm are the highway scientists in tin; demand 
that these conditions not merely maintain but im- 
prove, that the first fight against the horse has been 
taken up by the automobilists. 

When the motor car began to come into use, the 
teaming interests of the world were strong. They 
berated the automobile in unmeasured terms; said 
that it was a menace to the public and to the horse; 
that it endangered life and limb; in fact, advanced 
every argument against it that from time immemor- 
ial has been advanced against the advent of every 
great invention or civilizing influence. 

In the early days of the American Republic, the 
pack-saddle men fought bitterly against the advent 
of the wagon. They declared it would make possi- 
ble the carrying of heavier loads and the consequent 
ruining of the pack-saddle industry; the wagon men 
fought the stage coach on the theory that it would fa- 
cilitate traffic and throw wagon men out of work; 
the stage coach men battled against the railroads on 
the theory that the running of steam cars would 
drive out the stage-coach driver; and each in turn 
was forced to make way. 

The fight of the horse-car men against the trol- 
ley car is remembered by all. The claim was then 
made that 2,000,000 horses would be thrown out of 
work, and that horse breeders would starve. The 
trolley is well-nigh universal, and yet more horses 
are raised each year than the year before and they 
bring better prices. 

The horse interests have ever fought the automo- 
bile. There have been thousands of columns of ar- 
gument published against it, and short-sighted men 
have advocated such heavy taxation against it that 
a great and an ever growing industry would have 
been sadly hampered, had half the unwise legislation 
planned been put into execution. 

Now highway experts aided by the motor car inter- 
ests and by a powerful association of London and its 
suburbs have turned iike the trodden worm and 
started an attack on the horse. 

The claim they advance is that the polluting of 
all public thoroughfares is done not by automobilists 
but by horses; that if no horses were allowed to 
drop organic matter on public thoroughfares, the 
dust nuisance would soon be naught but an un- 
pleasant memory. They advance the logical state- 
ment that the nuisance created by hundreds of thous- 
ands of horses is detrimental to public health and 
a menace to the pavements, and they charge that the 
continual cleansing of the streets because of this 
traffic imposes a vast and an injtist tax upon the 
citizens. 

It was a source of great gratification to the Amer- 
ican chairman to be frankly told in both France and 
England that this Nation has stepped ahead of both 
those Nations in the testing of materials for build- 
ing macadam roads. Various experiments conducted 
by the Office of Public Roads have developed the 
fact that it is possible in road building to obtain a 
better bounded surface by mixing rocks, such as 
limestone, with silicious rocks, such as granite or 
sandstone. 

That, discovery — embodied in publications sent out 
through the United States Department of Agriculture" 
— had been adopted by some of the British highway 
engineers, and while in England Mr. Page was 
driven over a number of stretches of splendid high- 
way built by the blending of such material, and was 
commended by those who built them. 

In conjunction with that phase of highway con- 
struction, Mr. Page was asked if it would be pos- 
sible for his office to receive about :!0(i samples of 
the characteristic road-building rocks of Great Brit- 
ain and make laboratory tests of them. 

It was specifically stated in the official invitation 
sent from France many months ago that the Congress 
at Paris was called for the purpose of discussing the 
effect of automobile traffic upon public highways 
and if deemed detrimental to devise means of over- 
coming the effect. Asked what conclusion was 
reached by (he Congiess, Mr. Pag:- paid th.it auto- 
mobile traffic and its effect was very thoroughly dis- 
cussed and that many brilliant papers were pre- 
sented, every phase of the question being treated. 
As it was Impossible to arrive at a unanimous con- 
clusion, the question of damage done was left for a 
later determination. It was the consensus of opinion 
however, that automobiles driven at ordinary rates 
of speed are not especially harmful to good high- 
ways. 

Mr. Page was especially impressed by the laws reg- 
ulating automobile traffic in practically all portions 
of France and England. Unlike the laws prevailing 
in nearly every section of this country th motor- 
car restrictions of those countries are framed for 
the purpose of stopping reckless driving and the of- 
ficers responsible for their enforcement are not re- 
stricted as are American officials. The speed limit 
provisions are incorporated in the laws of France or 
England. If, in the judgment of an officer, a motor- 
car driver is reckless, even if proceeding at less than 
eight miles an hour, he is subject to arrest. If on 
the other hand be is proceeding at express speed on 
a broad thoroughfare, free from other traffic, and is 
not endangering the lives or the property of others, 
he is well within his rights and may not be in- 
terefered with. — Horse World. 



I 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



fSaturday, January 9, 1909. 



JOHNSTON AND SAVAGE ON RACE BETTNG. 

The editor of the New York Trotter and Pacer 
recently addressed letters to a number of promi- 
nent trotting horse men throughout the country, ask- 
ing them to answer the question "'Can harness rac- 
ing exist without pool selling? If so. how?" The 
only answers received were from Major P. P. John- 
ston, President of the National Trotting Association 
and Mr. M. W. Savage, of Minneapolis, owner of the 
champion pacer Dan Patch 1:55 and who has just 
paid $45,000 for the great pacer Minor Heir 1 : 59 V6- 
Their answers are here appended: 

Lexington, Ky., Nov. 25. 

Though 1 fear the horse interest has suffered from 
too much indiscreet talk, I will comply with your re- 
quest and risk further injury in the hope that 1 
may induce some of the doctors to treat the har- 
rassed patient with more consideration. 

Contests between horses to determine the best 
are as free from wrong as foot races between men, or 
any other physical effort where superiority achieves 
victory. This method of selecting the most valuable 
blood for the improvement of the breed, or to trans- 
mit to other breeds the finish, courage, speed anil 
endurance that have been so carefully developed in 
the thoroughbred, is invaluable. As a recreation 
apart from gambling, which is not a necessary inci- 
dent, contests between horses have always been 
regarded with favor by nearly all healthy-minded 
people. For these and other reasons they will go 
on into a future as remote as the hoary past in which 
they had their origin. Horse racing has survived the 
ages, not by the favor of gamblers, but in spite of 
them. 

The plea that it cannot be carried on without le 
gallzed gambling is untrue and challenges fatal 
hostility. The great world of religion and morality 
must and array itself with crushing forces against 
any industry that avows its dependence on gambling. 
Such avowals have been made by men who ought 
to have known better, and have unfortunately been 
taken as true by a great mass of people who would 
not otherwise be opposed to the horse interest. Nine 
tenths of those who attend races do so for the op- 
portunity to be in the open air under pleasing con- 
ditions and from love for the horse, whose "neck is 
clothed with thunder," and who "smelleth the bat- 
tle afar off." Races have been maintained in the 
past by the non-betting public and the horse owners 
themselves, who gave the premiums for which they 
contended. This method does not pay fabulous 
profits and is not likely to appeal to metropolitan 
track owners. Those who are not satisfied with 
legitimate profits are mainly responsible for the mis- 
leading assertions that horse racing cannot live with- 
out gambling, and for the defeat that inevitably 
awaits such a perilous proposition wherever the is- 
sue is forced. 

The sport of kings and freemen will go on even if 
we have to get back on the high plane of old-time 
sportsmanship, when breeders challenged each other 
and the great general public gathered to witness 
the contests. It will go on even if the running horse 
men are reduced to the dire extremity of racing, as 
trotting horse men have done, for their own money. 
The day when great fortunes are made on horses 
at a single meeting by those who have brought the 
business into disrepute may be gone, but contests on 
the race track, at the fair and in the show ring will 
stay, and, as on Presidential and other elections, 
wicked people will sometimes bet on them. 

Trotting horse men are not challenging hostility 
by unnecessary or injudicious avowals, but are 
moving hand in hand with the public sentiment that 
makes and enforces the law; this is different in dif- 
ferent localities, consequently the great industry en- 
joys more or less prosperity everywhere. Its strong- 
est friends and supporters are the very people who 
would abandon it if a claim that it depended on legal- 
ized gambling should be authoritatively advanced. 

P. P. JOHNSTON. 



Minneapolis, Minn., Nov. 28, 1908. 

It has been understood for years that I am op- 
posed to pool selling and naturally I am pleased at 
the reform wave that is sweeping over the coun- 
try. 

For some time I have believed that harness- 
horse racing could be made much more popular and 
would draw much larger crowds if the gambling 
could be eliminated. 

We have a very fine example of this in our Minne- 
sota State Fair which formerly allowed pool selling. 
Since pool selling has been abolished our fairs have 
grown immensely popular and the tremendous 
crowds are seven-day wonders to all who attend. 

I understand perfectly that "State Fair conditions " 
are not "race meeting conditions," but with honest 
racing and good advertising the right manager can 
greatly increase the attendance in any good racing 
city in this country. It will be necessary for the 
advertising man to go after the people, the same 
as is done in any business. 

The greatly increased attendance will much more 
than pay the amount turned in by the pool seller. 
Larger crowds can be worked up every year when 
it is thoroughly understood that gambling and 
drunkenness are unknown. I have long advocated 
that more of our State fairs must wake up and give 
larger purses for harness horse racing. Some of 
them have been in old, time-worn ruts so long that 
they do not realize that larger purses do not cost 
the fair association anything and that they will 
largely add to the general income of any fair because 
no one can dispute the fact that the racing draws the 



people. If any fair association thinks contrary I 
would like to see them give just one fair without 
racing. 

I am delighted with the abolishing of pool selling 
and firmly believe that it will work out to be the best 
thing that ever happened to the harness horse. In- 
dividual bets can never be abolished at horse racing, 
or at general elections, or at football, and I am not 
including individual bets in the pool selling class, 
(•ambling I am absolutely opposed to and want to see 
the harness horse freed from its avaricious and of- 
tentimes dishonest grasp. Very truly yours, 

M. W. SAVAGE. 

o 

IRISH MULES. 



An unusual importation which caused a iot of com- 
ment along West Street, New York, came lately on 
the White Star steamship "Bovic." For the first 
time in the history of the Port of New York, a bunch 
of Irish mules were landed. They are big, sleek, 
thrifty, useful-looking mules, and were consigned to 
James Butler, of grocery store fame. New York 
City. Bringing mules to America certainly looks like 
carting coals to Newcastle, and to find out the mean- 
ing of such an unusual occurrence, Mr. Butler was 
asked about the matter. 

"The explanation is very simple," said Mr. Butler, 
"how I happened to import these mules. Last sum- 
mer while on a trip abroad I spent two weeks au- 
tomobiling all over Ireland with my family. I had 
not been there for a number of years, and I saw 
many changes, all of them, 1 may say, for the bet- 
ter. Among the new sights were the number of 
fine looking mules we met and passed on the road 
The were at work in harness, singly, in pairs, and oc- 
casionally a mule four-in-hand. They showed breed- 
ing and high spirit; looked hardy and plucky to me 
a superior type that 1 had never seen in Ireland be- 
fore. On the less frequented roads, the automobile 
was a strange sight to them, and we had frequently to 
stop and let them prance past us, sometimes giving 
their drivers considerable trouble to keep them in 
the road. In this way I had ample opportunities 
of seeing their good points, and my curiosity was 
aroused. On inquiry I found that a new industry had 
started up in the horse-breeding sections of Ireland. 

"About ten years ago the British Government im- 
ported a number of the finest Spanish jacks for the 
purpose of crossing on the native mares with the 
view of raising an improved type of mule. The great 
need for such an animal from a British source was 
shown during the Boer war. The Irish hunter is 
famous as the best of his kind, and is a cross be- 
tween the English Thoroughbred and the native Irish 
part-bred mare. If the experiment should be equally 
successful with mules, as I believe it is, then a new 
source of agricultural wealth has been opened for 
Ireland, with its genial climate and rich pastures. 

"I use hundreds of horses in my grocery business, 
and partly from sentiment, but probably more from 
the utility standpoint. I became interested in the 
Irish mule. I had difficulty in finding any for sale, 
so great is the home demand, but through the kind- 
ness of my friend, James Talbot Powers. I have 
secured a number of the finest specimens for work 
purposes. The first shipment arrived on the steam- 
ship Bovic. They will be put to work shortly on 
the grocery delivery wagons. If they prove fit for 
the work, of which I have no doubt, more will follow, 
and the Irish mule may soon become a regular article 
of import." — Chicago Breeders Gazette. 

o 

THE CHICAGO SALE. 



The twenty-sixth regular auction of the Chicago 
Horse Sale Company at the Union Stock Yards was 
a wonderfud success, notwithstanding there were no 
sensational horses offered. Prices for the unusually 
large number of extra well-bred youngsters could not 
have been surpassed in any other market in the 
world. 

The highest price realized was $2000 for the well- 
known trotting mare Just The Thing 2:10%. This 
mare was sold several years ago at one of the same 
company's former sales as an undeveloped young- 
ster. She was purchased by Mr. Dick McMahon, 
who will race her in 1909. 

The second highest price of the sale was realized 
on Annette D., two-year-old record of 2:27%, a 
daughter of Axtell (3), 2:12, and very fashionably 
bred on the dam's sire. She was purchased by Dr. 
G. S. Lyman, Lexington, 111., for $1600. 

o 

KINGS COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION. 



The annual meeting of the stockholders of the 
Kings County Agricultural Association was held at 
the office of the association in Hanford, December 
21st, and 3350 shares of stock were represented, and 
the minutes of the meeting of December 16, 1907, 
were read and the reports of the treasurer and sec- 
retary for the year 1908 were received and accepted, 
after which the following were elected as directors: 

A. F. Nunes, A. C. Borges, J. D. Biddle, M. P. 
Costa, M. P. Avilla and J. O. Hickman. J. N. Bow- 
hay was chosen as temporary chairman and J. C. 
Minich temporary secretary, at the meeting. 

The reports read were very satisfactory and it is 
the intention to hold a fair next fall, and a good 
working balance is in the treasury as a starter. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



CONSIDERING A HANDICAP RACE. 



DETROIT, Dec. 26. — In an effort to ascertain the 
views of the horsemen on the question of a big han- 
dicap, to be raced at the 1909 meeting of the Detroit 
Driving Club, the organization is now extending an 
invitation to those men who have ideas on the sub- 
ject, to communicate them with a particular view to 
making the conditions such as to give a real chance 
to the great trotters of former seasons, still in train- 
ing, but for whom no real racing opportunity is now 
afforded. 

President W. W. Collier, W. R. Croul, Fred Postal, 
Dr. L. Breisacher and other members of the execu- 
tive committee have been at work for some time with 
this purpose in view and have already solicited th.i 
views of several of the horsemen. 

The gentlemen in charge of the Detroit organiza- 
tion join in the regret so generally expressed that 
there has been no chance for the public to compare 
the star performers of one year with those of the 
immediate past. They are strongly of the opinion 
that the patrons of their meetings would appreciate 
an opportunity of seeing in action such horses as 
Sweet Marie, Major Delmar, Highball, George G., 
Nutboy, Sonoma Girl and others that have figured 
prominently in the campaigns of former seasons, and 
whose names are among the brightest memories of 
the turf. Last year an attempt was made to place 
these in a class together, but it failed to fill, in spite 
of the fact that at least two of them would have been 
raced had the event taken place. With the view to 
bringing them all out, the handicap idea is now being 
labored on. 

In case a distance handicap is decided on, it seems 
to be the idea of the committee that the limit horses 
should be credited with nothing slower than 2:10 
ability. There is also a belief that the Boston event 
was conducted on a basis which penalized all too 
severely the horses of greatest speed. It is pointed 
out by the members of the committee that, even 
were the allowance made in that race based on the 
possibilities of actual performance, no provision had 
been made for the additional distance; which the 
back-mark starters were compelled to cover in trot- 
ting round the stragglers in their way, nor was there 
any allowance for the irregula clip which these 
horses were compelled to adopt on their trip through 
the immense field in front of them. 

At least one member of the committee is consider- 
ing the recommendation of a weight, instead of a 
distance penalty, coupling this with the provision 
that at least two elimination heats be trotted, the 
starters in the final to be the qualifying members of 
the front diivsions in the preliminaries, as was the 
case at Readville last year. Just how great this 
penalty should be and on what ground the basis of 
handicapping should be constructed is, of course, a 
matter to be decided in the future, in case his view 
should seem a wise one, when submitted to the other 
members of the committee, after all the returns are 
in. It is suggested, however, that a series of experi- 
ments be made with a view to determining the handi- 
capping power of weight in the sulky. Another mat- 
ter which would have to be settled would be a 
minimum weight which would permit a heavy man 
to drive one of the limit horses. Quite a number of 
the regular Grand Circuit drivers weigh over 170 
pounds and a scale should be adopted which would 
permit these men to do their own teaming, regardless 
of handicapping. 

"The big objection which harness horsemen seem 
to put forward against the handicap is the fact that 
they are compelled to pay entrance without knowing 
where they will be placed in the allotments," re- 
marked one member of the committee. "This can 
be nothing but a temporary condition, however, and 
will be readily accepted, when usage has proven the 
worth of the plan. The horsemen on the running 
turf have been conducting their events on this plan 
for a good many years and, except in those instances 
where a starter is penalized according to sex and 
former winnings, nobody can do more than guess at 
the verdict of the handicapper, yet no horseman ever 
hesitated naming a horse in the Suburban or any of 
the other big handicaps, for this reason." 

A possible objection to the weight system of han- 
dicapping is the doubt felt whether a sulky weighing 
around 30 pounds, and built to hold one man, would 
be a safe sort of a vehicle into which to load the 
weight of two. 

These are problems which the members of the 
committee are wrestling at present and in the solu- 
tion of which they hope to be aided by the advice of 
the men most intimately concerned. 

DEATH OF WILLIAM MC. 



William Mc, p, 2:05%, the old black war horse of 
George Castle of Chicago, was found dead in his stall 
the evening of December 22d. William Mc was 
foaled 1893 and began racing as a three-year-old. 
In his twelve campaigns he started 127 times, won 
62 races, was second 35 times, third 9 times, fourth 
9 times and unplaced 12 times. While in the Castle 
string he made 36 track records and 10 state records, 
putting up five of the former and two of the latter as 
late as 1906. He won $19,780 in purses, took a half- 
mile track record of 2:07, and was all the time a 
game, reliable horse. He was bred by Lu Green Jr. 
of Indianola, 111., and was by Alcymont 18529, dam 
Ella Mc, by De Jarnette 8045, and made his record 
in 1899 over the Terre Haute track in a winning 
race. After his retirement Mr. Castle presented him 
to John Dowling of Pontiac, Mich., who used the 
game old pacer as a family horse. He was appar- 
ently in the best of health to the hour of his death, 
which was supposed to be from heart disease. — Horse 
Review. 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



MEXICO A PARADISE FOR HUNTERS. 



[By "Sportsman."] 

To the sportsman tourist who has a dash of the 
field naturalist in his blood, Mexico is a peculiarly 
interesting country, as here the game of the north 
and the southland meet and fraternize during the 
winter months, and both sport and the study of 
natural history may be pursued under the most 
favorable and delightful climatic conditions. 

Be it 10, 12 or 16 gauge that you have brought 
packed in the bottom of your trunk, there is game 
here of all sizes to suit any bore or weight. From 
swan, geese, brant, sandhill cranes and wild turkey 
for the heavy 10 bore: to whirring quail and elusive, 
savory jacksnipe to be shot, or missed, with the 
little featherweight 16 gauge. 

The majority of sportsmen put the quail at the 
head of the list as the most popular game bird, and 
Mexico has some six or seven varieties of the part- 
ridge family and perhaps more. On the river bottoms 
and prairies of the Rio Grande our American quail, 
the "bob-white," is found in abundance where the 
teed and cover suit him, and generally he prefers 
the neighborhood of human habitation. While his 
first cousin, the blue Mexican quail, seems to be 
somewhat shyer and is more at home in the sage 
brush thickets of the sheep and goat ranges, while 
he displays an astuteness and foxy ability in keeping 
out of range of shotgun that baffles many a shooter, 
and is calculated to drive a conscientious and well 
broken quail dog to the verge of insanity. 

There is a tacit understanding among sportsmen 
where the blue quail abounds, that any way is fair 
to get them, flying, running, bunched, or "any old 
way," even with a club, if you can! but there's the 
rub — generally you can't; while little "bob-white'' is 
ever treated with the courtesy due to his gallant 
and sportsmanlike ways, and is either shot on the 
wing, or not at all. 

Massenas partridge, a most beautiful and some- 
what rare bird, is also to be found in the foothills 
of the mountain ranges that border the Rio Grande 
valley, usually in the most solitary and desolate 
localities where man but seldom goes. 

In the neighborhood of Durango another variety 
of partridge, much resembling the "bob-white," is 
found occasionally. Its most notable difference from 
the "bob-white" consists in its extremely short legs. 
Its habitat is on the rocky pine-covered mountains 
where the blue quail is never seen, and usually it is 
found in small coveys and it is not at all a common 
bird — we are unable to give even its local name. 

On the -peninsula at Baja, California, the beautiful 
valley quail of California abounds and in the State of 
Guanajuato we have shot quail that seemed to be a 
hybrid between the blue quail and the "bob-white." 

The prairie hen is occasionally to be met with on 
the dry plains of Coahuila, bordering on the Rio 
Grande, but can hardly be considered a Mexican 
game bird. 

In the tropical foothill country of the Pacific Coast 
a large and beautiful variety of the quail or partridge 
is found. It is called locally the "perdix," which 
simply means partridge, and differs most notably in 
habits, size and appearance from other members of 
its family. In size it is rather larger than the 
English partridge. It has a round, plump body with 
the merest vestige of a tail. Its plumage is of a slate 
blue except on the breast, where it is reddish brown, 
and its head and beak resemble that of a wild 
pigeon. Except in the mating season it is strictly a 
solitary bird, and haunts the shaded banks of the hot 
country water courses, and when flushed, rises with 
the whirr of a ruffled grouse; but drops to the 
ground again after a very short flight, and is easily 
approached by the hunter. 

Our Mexican jack snipe is the same bird that is 
known all over the American continent under dif- 
ferent local names, viz., jack snipe, English snipe 
and Wilson's snipe, which latter name is his scien- 
tific and proper title. He comes in September or 
October, and haunts the marshy places all over the 
country, and especially around the lakes in the valley 
of Mexico, until March or April and then takes flight 
for his northern breeding places. 

Some of the finest snipe shooting in the world may 
be enjoyed about the shores of Lake Oxchimilco, 
where President Diaz has a game preserve in which 
visiting sportsmen are occasionally permitted to 
shoot, and bags have been made there that would 
turn a "game hog" green with envy. 

A somewhat earlier visitor than the jack snipe is 
the golden plover, known in Mexico as the "ganga," 
which generally arrives with the first heavy rains 
of the month of August, when his querulous whistling 
call as he flies over, is the signal for sportsmen and 
epicures to get ready for a short period of keen 
enjoyment, as he only stays a few weeks and then 
disappears until the following year. About an ounce 
of No. 9 shot with 3% drams behind it of DuPont 
smokeless, is a very effective load for plover in a 
12 bore. 

Doves and wild pigeons are found all through 
Mexico in the greatest variety and abundance, and 
furnish fine sport to the expert wing shot, notwith- 
standing what sentimentalists from the north may 
say about it. 



In the Sierra Mad re a specie of wild pigeon much 
resembling the almost extinct passenger pigeon of 
the north, is frequently seen by the large game 
hunter, In flocks of from twenty to sixty, while along 
the coast a pigeon approaching in size and resem- 
bling in shape, color and square-cut tail, the common 
domestic blue pigeon, haunts the swamp country in 
small flocks. Its local name in Sinaloa is "patagon." 
It is shy and wary usually, and it requires good 
shooting to make a fair day s bag when hunting 
them. 

North, south, east and west, the common white- 
winged dove or "paloma real" and the Mexican 
ground dove, or, perhaps, a better name would be 
the "sharp-tailed dove," abounds in countless thou- 
sands. The white-winged dove is a rather slow flyer 
and is easily brought to bag by the veriest "muff" of 
a shot. But the sharp-tailed dove is a swift flyer, 
and can carry off more shot than any bird of his size 
that I have ever hunted. A charge of No. 8 in the 
first barrel and of No. 6 in the second is a good plan 
in hunting them, for if one scores a miss the first 
shot, the second will be at long range and at a bird 
flying approximately 150 miles per hour, as the way 
they "hike out" when they opine that their life is in 
danger, must be seen to be believed. On the table 
a fat ground dove broiled, leaves but little to be 
desired as a "bonne bouche," although but few 
gourmands are aware of this, and at most hotels 
where they are served they are simply "murdered" 
in the cooking. 

Two varieties of a diminutive member of the dove 
family also abound in Mexico. They are commonly 
known as "congitas"; their scientific name I am 
unable to give. In size they are but little larger 
than English sparrows. One variety has a sharp 
long tail like the ground dove, its congener, while 
the other, which is rarer, is a decided bobtail. Their 
exquisite penciled plumage and their trustful ways 
with human kind, should defend them from destruc- 
tion, but unfortunately for them, their flavor is un- 
approachable, and a friend of the writer, to whom 
the truth is usually a complete stranger, declares 
that they are the famous European "ortolan" which 
commands fabulous prices among the epicures of the 
old world. Perhaps this is so, but I doubt it. 

During the early fall and winter months when the 
wild, fierce "northers" are blowing in their greatest 
fury, sometimes above the noise of the icy blast may 
be heard the trumpet notes of the wild swans, wing- 
ing their way down from their northland homes in 
and near the Arctic circle, in search of winter quar- 
ters in our land of cactus and sunshine, and on the 
sunny lagoons of the coast and the wide, shallow 
lakes of the central plateau, they make their homes 
until the opening spring warns them that it is time 
to take their northward flight again for the Arctic. 

It is indeed an exceptionally fortunate hunter who 
manages to bag one of these rare and beautiful birds, 
but it can be done, and the lake of Guatemape in 
Durango or in the marshes around Lake Chapala are 
the parts of the country where one is most likely to 
meet with success in his hunt. 

The Canada goose and both the gray and white 
brant also come to spend the winter here in con- 
siderable numbers, as well as the sandhill crane, 
which is a serious nuisance to many of the farmers 
whose main crop is corn, the cranes insisting on 
taking a heavy toll from the crop as it stands in the 
fields, and in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, 
utterly refusing to be killed by the outraged pro- 
prietors of the lands whose crops they have ravaged. 

During February and March the wild geese that 
winter in the neighborhood of Lake Chapala get so 
abnormally fat from feeding in the fields of "gar- 
banza," which is a favorite crop there, that they are 
frequently captured without the use of firearms, by 
being "run down" on horseback. The modus op- 
erandi of this method of hunting is very simple to a 
good horseman. The geese while feeding in the early 
morning are approached as nearly as possible with- 
out alraming them. When finally they do take flight 
they are followed at the horse's best speed, and as 
they are both fat and lazy, they usually settle again 
at a distance not exceeding BOO to 600 yards from 
their starting place. If the horse is a good one and 
the lay of the land favorable, they are again forced 
to fly before they have fairly taken breath. Usually 
after they have been forced to (light for the third 
time, they are "all in" and on alighting simply run 
along in front of their pursuers at a most ungainly 
waddle, with their wings trailing on the ground, and 
utterly unable to fly, making their capture a matter 
of the greatest ease. 

This will sound somewhat like a "fish story" to a 
northern goose hunter, but in an hacienda near La 
Piedad I have seen a flock of between twelve and 
sixteen gray brant, that the proprietor assured me 
were caught in this manner in the previous spring. 

The states of Jalisco, Michoacan and Durango offer 
the greatest inducements to sportsmen in search of 
geese and sandhill cranes, although along the Rio 
Grand*- llu-y also abound, and in many other Section! 
of the country. 

Wherever there is water ducks are to be found in 
greater or less numbers, according to the abundance 
of feed, and also in many cases their abundance or 
scarcity is due to the number of native hunters, who 



8 



make their living by killing them for market, both 
in and out of season, as restricted game laws are as 
yet hardly known here. [But soon will be, it is 
reported, and happily so. — Ed ] 

While the gentle Aztec Indian of the valley of 
Mexico has not greatly advanced in the thorny paths 
of civilization since the Conquest, but seems rather 
inclined to let the "white man's burden" lay in the 
dust or "go hang," as a duck killer he has taken a 
note from the white man's book and got up an 
infernal machine for killing ducks by wholesale, 
which puts in the shade as a destructive agent any- 
thing ever invented by the most ignoble and in- 
ventive game hog of Caucasion descent. It is simple 
but frightful in its effectiveness. At some point 
which the ducks are fond of frequenting in search 
of feed, rest and solitude, the ground is carefully and 
systematically baited with corn and other food so as 
to attract them there in the largest possible numbers. 
Every precaution is taken to see that, they are not 
disturbed while either feeding or resting, and, in 
short, the place is made as near a duck's paradise 
as is possible. While all duckdom is aware of the 
fact that there is a good thing up the lake in the 
"tulas" and that there they can feed, bask in the 
sun and sleep undisturbed by the hunters, a masked 
battery is constructed which commands every foot 
of the feeding ground. This battery is made of a 
"cheveaux du frise" of old musket and gun barrels, 
the marks and dates on which would almost make a 
collector of ancient firearms go wild with envy. The 
guns are trained at all angles, some to rake the 
feeding innocents on the water, others a little higher 
to take them on the raise, and still others to shoot 
hole* through the atmosphere, and, incidentally, Hi" 
ducks that have escaped the first two volleys and 
hover for a few seconds over the water, waiting for 
their dead and wounded companions, and hardly 
knowing which way to fly. When all is ready, watch- 
ers are constantly on the alert for the most favorable 
instant to make the shot, and trains of powder are 
laid to each gun barrel, which, as a matter of course, 
are all lockless. When the water is actually black 
with ducks, the trains are fired, and then the dead 
ducks are gathered in by hundreds. Usually but one 
shot is fired weekly at these duck slaughtering 
houses. But it is on record that on Lake Xochimilco 
more than 1,500 birds have been killed by a single 
discharge of one of these batteries. And yet there 
are foreigners who say that the native Mexican has 
no inventive genius. 

The varieties of duck that the sportsman will most 
commonly find are canvasback, mallard, redhead, 
sprigtail, spoonbill, widgeon, bald-pates and both blue 
and greenwing teal. Besides these there are three 
other varieties that are unknown to most, northern 
shooters, and are probably visitors from South Amer- 
ica. One, the red or cinnamon teal, is a beautiful 
bird. Its body is a bright reddish brown, its wings 
resemble those of blue wing teal, over its thighs hang 
bunches of long, soft feathers, like the hackles of A 
cock's neck, which gives it a strong and graceful 
appearance. The head of the male is speckled with 
brown, green and white, the brown predominating. 
In size it is slightly larger than the other two va 
rieties of teal, and served on the table it has a better 
flavor. It usually is found in small flocks of them 
from two to three or a dozen, and is rather a rare 
bird. I have met with it from Durango to Guana- 
juato, but have never seen it in the Rio Grande 
valley, and doubt whether it ranges that far east. 
[The cinnamon teal is fairly numerous in Califor- 
nia.— Ed.] 

In the lagunas of the tierre caliente both the wild 
muscovy duck and a duck called locally the 
"pichechin" are found. The muscovy in shape re- 
sembles its domestic relative, known in Mexico as 
"pato de Castillo," but is rather larger, of a dark 
brown, almost black in color, with black spots on 
the plumage of breast and neck. It is strictly a 
fruit and seed eater, and is never known to feed on 
fish. Like the woodduck of the north it perches in 
trees and is often shot while perched in the tall 
"capomo" trees feeding on the fruit. 

Of the "pinchechin," so called from its cry, I can 
say but little, as I have never bagged one. In size 
and shape it is rather like the sprigtail. but has 
longer legs and consequently stands higher. In color 
it is darker and has a red bill. These observations 
have been made on birds that kept out of gunshot, 
and in consequence are lacking in detail. 

Both of these ducks make Mexico their northern- 
most range, but range south, probably as far as the 
equator. 

In the haunts of the ducks are also to be found 
the green or wood ibis, and the white or Egyptian 
ibis, as well as innumerable birds of many different 
species, all known under the general name of "bay 
birds." The curlew also abounds on the high plains 
as well as along the coast, and often furnishes fine 
sport. 

In the shady "quebradas" where the Ice cold 
streams of the Sierra find their way to either coast 
in a series of waterfalls and miniature cataracts and 
rapids, the pheasants have their haunts. I know of 
three species; some say there are four — "qulefl 
sabe?" The first is the "Faisan real," or royal 
pheasant, which is a superb bird of about the size 
of the turkey. It. is found in the neighborhood of 
Tampico and along the gulf coast. In the aviary of 
the Alameda in the City of Mexico live specimens 
may be seen. "El faisan," or common pheasant, Is 
a much smaller bird, only weighing some four or 
five pounds. It is of a dark brown color with black 
spots on the feathers and a wattled, crested head. 
Both neck and tail are long in proportion to the size 
of its body. Its favorite refuge is in tin? most remote 
mountain gulches in the shadows of the high Sierra, 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



where, if once found, is easily killed, as it is rather 
stupid and unsuspicious in its ways. 

Hut the one with which I am faimliar is the 
"chacalaca" or "cuiche," whose range is from the 
frost line in the Sierra to tidewater. Its northern 
range limit I am unable to give, but it probably does 
not extend far north of the latitude of the Yaqui 
river. In shape it closely resembles the faisan, but 
in size is but slightly larger than an average barn- 
yard pullet, although its long neck and tail makes 
it appear considerably larger. The beautiful crested 
head with its bright red wattled cheeks, and the 
dark olive green plumage of the upper part of its 
body, changing to a rich reddish brown below on 
breast and legs, make it a notably handsome bird. 
It is usually found near water in large timber, and 
where the wild fig tree or '"chelate" abounds is its 
favorite haunt, and the hunter or traveler can easily 
locate it at early dawn by its weird, harsh call, which 
reminds one forcibly of a saw riling establishment 
in full blast, for, unfortunately, like the peacock, the 
chacalaca's voice is not at all in harmony with its 
plumage. The most notable feature in its internal 
anatomy is the total absence of a crop. This per- 
haps may be explained by the fact that it is a fruit 
eater, but why, in one of the sexes, the alimentary 
canal should instead of following its ordinary straight 
course to the stomach, be diverted out under the skin 
of the breast and enter the abdominal cavity near the 
root of the tail and close to the vent, is one of the 
mysterious provisions of nature which is difficult to 
explain. They are easily domesticated and may often 
be seen in the villages of the "tierra caliente" frater- 
nizing with the domestic fowls. A cross between 
them and a game cock, which occasionally occurs, is 
said to produce the very best fighting stock. |This 
bird is not a member of the pheasant family. — Ed.| 

"Haves" or jackrabbits and "cottontail" rabbits are 
to be found all over the country in greater or less 
abundance, and with gray, black and fox squirrels 
which live in the pine forests and the tall timber of 
the river bottoms of both "tierra caliente" and "tierra 
templada," about make up the list of available four- 
footed small game, unless coons, possums, arma- 
dillos, foxes and wildcats be also admitted to the 
list. 

Parrots, while not "game," furnish good sport to 
wing shots all along either coast, where in "roasting 
ear time" they descend on the cornfields in flocks 
of hundreds and do serious damage to the crops if 
not frightened off by boys with slings or men with 
guns who are stationed there for that very purpose. 
They are of all sizes, from the tiny little green "cata- 
rinas" or love birds, the size of a sparrow, up to the 
great green and red macaws which have a spread of 
wings of over three feet, and will measure close on 
to three feet from tip to tip. While the parrot is a 
bird of beautiful plumage, as a table delicacy it Is 
not to be recommended, as we know from sad ex- 
perience. Our first essay at eating parrot was 
attended with modified success, as the bird must 
have been comparatively young, and after several 
hours' boiling became soft enough to masticate and 
finally swallow, leaving behind it an impression that 
we had lunched on the sole of a rubber boot. The 
next one was built of sterner stuff, and must have 
been fledged about the date of Mexican independ- 
ence. The more it was boiled, the more invulnerable 
it became to the attacks of knife and fork, until it 
was finally thrown out on the waste heap where it 
caused the death of a valuable specimen of the 
"scissor bill" breed of hog, who in attempting to 
swallow it whole, as chewing it was impossible, was 
choked to death. Its owner attempted to mulct us 
for damages on the ground of criminal carelessness. 

While a forty-pound wild turkey gobbler can hardly 
be classed as small game, their rare occurrence of 
that weight still justifies me in mentioning thi:; king 
of American game birds in the list of Mexican small 
game. He is found from the Sierra to the sea, wher- 
ever feed, water, cover and other conditions are 
favorable to his pleasant and easy existence. There 
are three varieties, all equally shy, astute, wary and 
hard to bag, and the one old gobbler successfully 
stalked and killed is certainly as much credit to the 
sportsman's woodcraft as the killing of three or four 
fool' deer such as may be frequently met with on 
the turkey range. 

On the Rio Grande border the common bronze wild 
turkey of Texas abounds in many places, although 
not in the abundance of the days of yore, before 
repeating rifles were so much in evidence. 

In the western Sierra Madre a lighter colored but 
equally large turkey is commonly found, which has 
a large bunch of white feathers on the rump, and may- 
be very appropriately called the white-rumped wild 
turkey. It abounds in the state of Durango. and I 
have seen as many as sixty in a single drove. 

Though southern Mexico is the home of the some- 
what smaller but remarkably beautiful Occelated or 
Honduras turkey, I have no personal knowledge of 
this turkey except through mounted specimens in the 
National Museum in Mexico. 

While a 10 gauge shotgun has been mentioned as 
the proper weapon for turkey hunting, really it is 
only a bungler's arm. The gentleman sportsman's 
tool for killing turkey is a small bore, finely sighted 
and well balanced rifle, to be used preferably with 
full jacketed bullets, and high power smokeless 
powder. 

In this connection I may be pardoned if I give an 
account of a remarkable shot that I made while hunt- 
ing in the dear old Sierra Madre many years ago. 

While resting in camp one bright afternoon, three 
large gobblers walked out upon the mesa some three 
hundred yards away, and commenced feeding. I 
attempted to stalk them, but before getting wi;hin 
shot they took alarm and ran; separated one from 



the other by a distance of about twenty-five to thirty 
feet, as the leader ran up a tree-shaded rocky hillside 
about one hundred and forty yards away. For the 
fraction of a second 1 saw his profile between the 
trunks of an oak and a madrono, the light striking 
it in such a manner that it semed like a picture in 
a rustic frame, his head almost touching the madrono, 
while his tail brushed the oak. 

The thought flashed through my mind, "If I put a 
bullet plumb center between those two trunks, eigh- 
teen inches from the ground, I will drop gobbler No. 
2" (who was entirely out of sight behind the rocks 
and brush). To think was to shoot in those wild old 
Sierra days. The ringing report of the Winchester 
that always put the lead where the muzzle was 
pointed, woke the echoes of the old gray peaks above 
me, and as the smoke drifted away from the muzzle 
1 saw gobbler No. 2 rolling down the hillside, shot 
through and through at the wing coverts. 

Deputy Sheriff Hi Bond of Eagle Pass, Texas, who 
is an authority on these matters, has declared to the 
writer, when asked for his opinion, that it was "jest 
a d — n fool shot — no skill about it." But whether 
skillful or lucky, I ate that gobbler with an extra 
relish. And he was a fat one! 

o 

MONTANA SPORTSMEN WANT LAWS CHANGED. 



Concerted effort will be made by a number of Mon- 
tana sportsmen to have the game laws revised at the 
coming session of the legislature. In different parts 
of the state the matter has been informally considered 
and it is likely that a meeting of the Montana Fish 
and Game Protective Association will be called to 
meet in Helena shortly before the session to take 
up the matter. 

Hardly a sportsman in Montana but who believes 
that if the grouse and fool hens are to be prevented 
from becoming extinct, it will be necessary to have 
a closed season for at least two years, and a number 
of hunters are in favor of a closed season for five 
years. Where a few years ago it was no trouble 
for a hunter to find and kill from twenty-five to forty 
birds a day, this last season if he succeeded in kill- 
ing two or three birds a day he was exceedingly for- 
tunate. There are a number of causes which have 
operated to almost exterminate the birds in Montana 
the principal one being the wet, cold springs of the 
past two or three years which killed the young chicks. 
Then the hunters killed the old birds the following 
tall with the resut that the number of birds for hatch- 
ing the chicks became smaller each year. 

Another cause for the scarcity of grouse and fool 
hens in the state has been the wanton killing in 
the early summer before the season opened by the 
railroad construction gangs and the French rounders 
of the tenderloin districts. The French from Helena 
district have been accustomed to go out early in Au- 
gust and to spend that month slaughtering the birds 
indiscriminately. This past season several Helena 
persons who had occasion to go up on Lyons creek be- 
fore September found the French camped there and 
around the camps were grouse feathers and scores of 
heads. 

The sportsmen will oppose all efforts to re-establish 
the spring shooting of wild fowl. Since spring shoot- 
ing was abolished by the legislature several years ago 
hundreds of ducks have summered in the state in- 
stead of going further north and the supply of na- 
tive ducks has been greatly increased. It is as- 
serted that the spring wild fowl are not particularly 
good eating and that since there has been no spring 
shooting the fall season has been much improved. 

It is likely that an effort will be made to have the 
open season for the shooting of elk, which now ex- 
tends from September first to December first, re- 
duced by fifteen days, making the open season end 
November fifteenth. This change is desired by hunt- 
ers and game protectionists because it is their be- 
lief that more elk are slauehtered d~-?ng the last half 
of November than during all the rest of the season. 
It is explained that by November first the snows in 
the mountains where the elk range are very deep ana 
the elk is such a stupid animal that it is an easy 
matter to slay them. The elk, it is said, unlike the 
deer when pursued, will dash up the first gulch on 
its flight and will stupidly persist in fighting its way 
up toward the very head, no mater how deep the snow 
is. Consequently in any ordinary season the snow 
has drifted so deeply in the gulches that the elk wal- 
lows helplessly in the big drifts and the hunter on 
snowshoes has no more trouble in killing the brute 
than if it were tied up to a post. 

Before November fifteenth drifts are not so deep 
and the elk has a better opportunity to escape. Then 
real ability is required to stalk the animals and the 
hunter who secures his elk head may take a just 
pride in the achievement. 

o 

Ice Covered Duck Ponds — Last week Portland 
sportsmen had no shooting for the reason that the 
ponds on the preserves were covered with ice. 

The lakes in all the preserves were coated with a 
thin sheet about half an inch thick on Sunday morn- 
ing with the result that ducks circled high over the 
feeding grounds and returned to the river, where 
an all day quackfest was held over the loss of break- 
fast. A few of the more enthusiastic sportsmen suc- 
ceeded in breaking the ice in front of their blinds, 
getting out a string of decoys, and for their trouble 
were rewarded with a few birds. 

On some of the smaller lakes the ice was after- 
wards broken by the keepers of the preserves in or- 
der to let the ducks come in and to keep the birds 
from hunting a warmer climate until the chinook 
winds come in and clear up the lakes. 



ANGLERS' ANNUAL MEETING. 



The California Anglers' Associati aembers 

gathered at the club rooms last Monday evening over 

100 strong, the occasion being lb ganization's 

fifth annual meeting and smoker. The club's motto 
is "Propagation and Protection of Game Fishes" — a 
State asset. 

Various reports submitted by the club officers show 
that the association is in strong financial condition 
and has an active membership of nearly 200 en- 
thusiastic anglers and sportsmen. This membership 
is not entirely made up of local sportsmen, for the 
roster has inscribed upon it the names of anglers 
and sportsmen from Siskiyou to San Diego counties, 
with several members located in the East, among 
them President Roosevelt, whose framed letter of 
acceptance of honorary membership, written in 
characteristic sportsman style, hangs in a promi- 
nent place on the clubroom wall. 

The board of directors elected for the ensuing 
year is the following: Charles F. Breidenstein, W. A. 
L. Miller, Li. Levy, James Lynch and Hugh Cope- 
land. These new directors, together with George A. 
Wentworth, C. R. Overholtzer, Dr. Charles E. Leit- 
head, H. B. Gosliner and W. J. Street, holdovers, will 
constitute the directorate for the coming year. Paul 
W. Shattuck, H. H. Baker and Arthur Rochefort of 
Point Reyes were elected to membership. 

A club committee will present a constitutional 
amendment for adoption at the present session of the 
Legislature, with the intention in view of preventing 
the wholesale pre-empting and fencing off of every 
available trout stream or fishing water in this State 
from the enjoyment of the individual angler, partic- 
ularly those streams that are stocked by the State 
Fish Commission. In this respect, prompt action 
of the club at the last session of the Legislature 
headed off a measure submitted that would have, 
by a trespass clause, made practically every trout 
stream in this state a fish preserve for wealthy clubs 
or individuals owning or leasing lands through which 
trout waters run. 

The proposed constitutional amendment is as fol- 
lows: "The people of this State shall have the 
right to fish along the shores of the ocean, bays, lakes, 
lagoons, estuaries and from the banks of all rivers, 
creeks, streams and other waters stocked with fish 
by the State, or which contain fish that are indigenous 
to such waters, and no law restricting such right 
shall ever be passed; provided that the Legislature 
may, by statue, provide for the seasons when the 
different varieties of fish may be taken." 

Other measures advocated by the club, and which 
have the moral support and Approval of a majority 
of anglers and sportsmen in this State, it is claimed, 
are the following proposed changes in the present 
laws that will be presented and urged for passage 
in the interest of the people of the State more than 
that of the individual sportsmen: 

1. A combined license tax upon hunting and fish- 
ing at the rate of $1 for both, instead of for hunt- 
ing alone. This for the taking of game and pro- 
tected fish only and exempting from the angling 
tax any one under the age of 16 years. 

2. An open season in tidewaters on steelhead 
trout during the entire year. 

As the fish are only found in the Coast streams at 
certain times this particular provision would not 
be a detrimental one. 

3. A close season for the steelhead in fresh water 
during the time it is unlawful to catch other trout 
in fresh w r ater. 

4. A change in the open season on trout from May 
1 to November 15. as it is now, to begin April 1 and 
close November 15. 

This would give a month more of the open season. 
This change is a source of much argument among 
the angling fraternity. In some streams it is admit- 
ted the present law is a good one, but in a majority 
of waters, particularly the Coast streams of easy 
access, the best fishing is found early in the season. 
The present statute practically puts these streams on 
the shelf. 

5. A law closing all sloughs to the net fishermen 
and also making it illegal to fish within 500 feet of 
the mouth of such sloughs. 

This measure is intended to protect steelhead. 
trout, black bass and striped bass, particularly the 
latter game fish in the bay water tributaries. It is 
claimed the net fishermen have depleted many creeks 
and sloughs that in the past have been alive with 
striped bass. There is a State law which makes il- 
legal the use of a net across a river, stream or 
slough — only drifting nets may be used and these 
with but 4%-inch meshes. The market fishermen 
are accused, and justly so, of staking nets across a 
slough just before the turn of the tide, generally at 
night time. On the ebb every fish that is coming 
down stream is taken, particularly so when small- 
meshed nets are used. 

In some counties ordinances have been adopted re- 
stricting the rapacity of the netmen. In Sonoma 
county netting in any of its streams is prohibited. In 
Alameda county the market fishermen were stopped 
from drawing their nets in the Estuary and in San 
Diego and Los Angeles counties the net fishers are 
restricted to certain distances from the piers and 
resorts, this in the interest of tourist and visiting 
individual anglers. The San Diego and Los Angeles 
regulations have been upheld by the courts. 

6. The restriction of night net fishing between the 
hours of 8 p. m. and 4 a. m. for the catching of pro- 
tected fish. 

7. Raising the minimum fine for violating the pro- 
Visions of the law for protection of fish from $20 to 
$100. 

Time and again a capture of fishermen with a boat- 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



load of black bass, worth from $200 to $400, has been 
settled by a $25 or $50 fine. The netters can well 
afford to do business on that, basis. 

8. A law requiring the payment of money to the 
State for fish supplied by the State Fish Commis- 
sion for the stocking of private waters within this 
State. 

9. A close season upon striped bass for at least 
two months during the year. 

If any fish ever needed protection during the 
spawning season this particular game fish is en- 
titled to charitable consideration, the inroads, from 
every source, upon the present supply has made a 
lamentable shortage of a good food fish. Striped 
bass now command a retail price of 25 cents a pound 
as against 10 cents a pound several years ago. 

10. A law making it unlawful to spear or gig 
salmon. 

This is a matter that should receive the favorable 
action of the law makers. In Paper Mill creek and 
the streams of San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties 
every year when the salmon and large steelhead are 
running hundreds of fish are secured while going up 
stream through shallow spots or narrow passages. 
This rascally work is mainly accomplished at night- 
time, the fish murderers build fires on shore and 
watch the fish come from the surf into the lagoons 
and when they pass the fires of those on the lookout 
at the runways they are easily seen and captured. 
Most of these fish are salted down by ranchers. 

The social events of the evening were addresses 
by President Watt, George A. Wentworth, Sam Wells, 
Charles Breidenstein and others: songs by J. J. 
Menefee, Zeigler and Delphino; piano solos by George 
Roberts and C. Coquil. A. N. Blade recited an orig- 
inal poem, "The Anglers' Toast." 

Chief Deputy Commissioner Charles A. Vogelsang 
represented the Fish Commissioners, who individu- 
ally were out of the city. Mr. Vogelsang's talk was an 
interesting and brief resume of the work of the Com- 
mission during the past year. His remarks were re- 
ceived with frequent applause and satisfaction by 
the large audience present. 

o ■ 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Duck Hunting Notes — Local shooters have had 
lather an indifferent week, the recent rains having 
scattered the birds far and wide in search of the 
variety of food to be found in thousands of ponds 
and puddles in the fields. 

On the Suisun last Sunday there was a general av- 
erage of fair bags only, with here and there a limit 
on sprig and teal. 

Down in the San Joaquin Valley at Los Banos, 
Newmans, Firebaughs and resorts of that section, 
the birds have been rather plentiful. Large numbers 
of gray geese have been bagged also. 

Petaluma creek, near Black Point, Marin county, 
and the waters of the nigh bay shores have recently 
been covered with sticky, black oil refuse. Hundreds 
of ducks have become so smeared and permeated 
with the greasy mess that they have been easily 
caught, such as do not drown, after the poor birds 
have struggled to the shore. The birds, after getting 
on shore or in the titles are incapable of hardly any 
exertion, not even to the extent of feeding, such of 
them as do not starve are caught and eaten by the 
minks and raccoons. Pete Walsh, of Black Point, 
caught over two dozen oil-smeared ducks, many 
of them fat canvasback, and penned them up intend- 
ing to liberate them again when they were cleansed 
of the clogging oil. Ducks that have been soaked 
with floating oil are unpalatable, the stuff seems to 
work right into the skin. 

Sacramento hunters have enjoyed quite a degree 
of good sport according to a report in the Sacra- 
mento Bee: 

"The ducks enjoyed a short respite from the rav- 
ages of the hunters this week by taking advantage of 
the recent ■ storms and hieing themselves inland 
and away from the ponds. The gale of Saturday 
night put a damper on Sunday hunting and the 
storm of Monday night hindered the sport in a like 
manner for Tuesday. The birds hesitated but a short 
time with the arrival of the heavy showers of last 
week and left their usual haunts to places out of 
reach of the hunters. The hunters on the Big Lake 
grounds were fortunate in burning powder Sunday. 

If the rains proved a disturber for the birds it 
evened up matters by furnishing water for the thirsty 
marshes and lowlands. Up at the Monitor the water 
is coming nicely and by the week end the grounds 
will have an ample supply of moisture. The marshes 
west of the city and in Yolo County which have 
been dry as bones since the season started, are get- 
ting their first refreshing, and it is expected that 
before long they will be carrying a goodly supply. 
This will be welcomed by hunters other than those 
who belong to clubs. 

A party of fourteen hunters invaded the Monitor 
grounds Sunday, and although no limits were bagged, 
every one of the party carried home a nice string. 
Those in the party were Judge J. C. March, Louis 
Smith, Vincent Calegori, Tom Dunlap, L. S. Upson, 
Charles Demerritt, Frank Waterman, Ralph .lost, 
Lee Gorman, Harry Trumpler, John Guisto, B. H. 
Gallup, George Barnett and Joe Carey. Carey was 
high man of the party, with twenty-eight. The ma- 
jority of the birds killed were teal, as usual, with 
a sprinkling of sprig and bluebills. 

The annual worry of the farmers in the Sacra- 
mento Valley is beginning to arrive. Wild geese 
have been drifting in from the north in great num- 
bers and are taking to the fields in search of feed. 
Already the ranchers in the north are fearing for 
their crops, and are hiring men to keep the pests 
away. A big demand is being made on local ammu- 



nition houses for heavy rifles and ammunition, one 
ranch yesterday ordering a thousand rounds of shells 
to start with." 

Los Angeles duck hunters had a great day Decem- 
ber 27th. it being a banner occasion for the week 
end shooters, it was estimated that fully 1,500 birds 
were slaughtered by the visiting gunners on the 
local club preserves alone. A largenumber of sports- 
men were out and the ducks were everywhere plen- 
tiful. 

The club gunners generally admit that shooting 
this fall has continued exceptionally good, and par- 
ticularly during the last month and ducks have been 
in evidence on the local ponds in gratifying num- 
bers. Limit shooting has been the rule rather than 
the exception since the heavy rains in November. 

Mallards, gadwall and spoonies have been shot in 
greater numbers than for several seasons, while the 
supply of teal and sprig has been almost unlimited 
since the opening of the season. The birds have been 
noticeably in fine condition and the methods of the 
local clubmen in systematically furnishing proper 
feed to the birds has borne excellent fruits in the 
fat, firm meat. 

Two days afterward the shooting is described: 
Mediocre was the sport in evidence on the duck 
preserves yesterday morning, and the gunners of the 
mid-week squad found the shooting inferior to the 
results obtained the first of the week. During the 
forenoon the sea was calm, and hardly a breath of 
air stirred. 

The early morning gunners as a rule found the 
shooting unsatisfactory for several hours, and those 
who returned before noon had their bags but half 
full, and but a half-dozen in the entire visitors' squad 
shot the limit before the wind started up. After 
noon a fresh cool breeze began to blow in from 
the ocean, and the ducks came in a steady flight 
affording the patient members excellent shooting. 



Quail Notes — The scarcity of quail in many sec- 
tions of this State where they usually abound has 
been the subject of much discussion by sportsmen 
since the opening of the present season. The dry 
weather is blamed for the cause of the absence of 
birds, for it is conceded that there were the general 
number of birds this season but they could not be 
located. Al. M. dimming, a prominent sportsman of 
this city, had the following to say on this question: 

"The absence of quail from the usual haunts of the 
birds is, in my opinion, due to the dry weather. The 
birds bred as usual this season and I am informed by 
natives of the places where they are usually most 
plentiful that there were just as many young birds 
hatched as in former seasons. The quail, however, 
as soon as their young are matured, depart for the 
high ridges where there is plenty of cover and there 
they remain until the winter rains drive them out 
into the valleys and open spaces. There has not been 
enough rain this year to send the birds out of the high 
cover, and in consequence the shooting has been 
poor. Recently it has improved somewhat owing to 
the rainfall which occurred during the early part of 
the month of December, but it is still difficult to 
get a limit bag, and during a visit to Los Alamos 
two weeks ago I did not get the limit on a single 
day that I was out — eighteen being the largest num- 
ber secured on a single day's shoot, and that was only 
secured after the hardest kind of work and a se- 
vere tramp over an extensive area of ground. Last 
season at this time it was an easy matter to get a 
limit bag, sometimes a couple of hours' shooting being 
all that was necessary. 

The conditions which prevail at Los Alamos are 
general throughout the State. San Benito and other 
quail-shooting centers are bare of birds, and even as 
far south as San Diego there is a scarcity of quail 
such as has not been known for years. I am sat- 
isfied, however, that the bird's are still in the State, 
and that they will make their appearance as soon as 
a storm of sufficient severity drives them from the 
high cover which they are now using. Quail always 
frequent the same locality and the birds which are 
now in the higher ridges will, as soon as they make 
for the lower levels, gravitate to the places from 
which they went after the last breeding season." 



Angling Notes — Steelhead fishing for a week 
past has been off by reason of the rains. The waters 
of Russian river, Paper Mill creek and other Coast 
streams, up to Wednesday last were of the color 
and consistency of pea soup. 

Fair weather for the last two days of this week will 
induce a good attendance of steelhad anglers at 
Point Reyes. 

Striped bass fishers who tried the Wingo sloughs 
and the San Antone caught few fish. On Monday A. 
Douglass of San Rafael, landed a 25 pounder at 
Wingo. 



Mexico Will Bar American Hunters — The wild 
country of Lower California south from the Tia Juana 
and back in the hills from the ports of lOnsenada. 
Santa Rosalia and San Quintin, is no longer to be 
the hunter's paradise. The Mexican government has 
decided to put restrictions on hunting for the pur- 
pose of stopping the ruthless slaughter of mountain 
sheep. The restrictions will also affect other classes 
of hunting. 

An American is bringing this about for the purpose 
of guarding against the extermination of the wild 
sheep of the mountains. He is Dr. W. T. Hornady, di- 
rector of the Bronx Zoological park of New York 
city. He called attention to the fact that the sheep 
are being ruthlessly slaughtered to the notice of 
President Diaz, who has issued a manifesto to the ef- 
fect that all hunters entering Mexican territory must 
first secure a permit from the nearest representative 



of the government. He also forbids the killing of 
mountain sheep without a special permit direct from 
the seat of government at the City of Mexico. 

These orders are said to be in effect and a special 
game protection law is to be adopted by the Mexican 
congress now in session. Having hunted mountain 
sheep until they are now entirely extinct in this 
country, sportsmen have followed them to their 
haunts in Lower California regions, and until there 
is now fear they will soon be killed off down there. 

Numerous hunting parties have passed through San 
Diego this fall, going down on the steamer St. Denis 
to Ensenada or to San Quintin, where they hunted 
and slew game to their hearts' content, as heretofore 
there has been no limit in Mexican territory. These 
reports reached Mr. Hornady, who communicated 
them to President Diaz. 

At Mr. Hornady's suggestion, the government is 
drafting a bill protecting fish and wild game through- 
out the country. At present Mexico has no fish and 
game law, and the conutry is being overrun with 
American sportsmen and market hunters. The pas- 
sage of the proposed measure by the Mexican con- 
gress is assured. 

The order will affect Southern California hunters 
to some extent, as the country below Tia Juana and 
around Campo is considered good quail territory. As 
soon as the permit law goes into force it is probable 
that Mexican customs officials will demand a tee from 
hunters for the necessary permission. A number of 
San Diego sportsmen owning land down there have 
their own preserves and it is probable they may be 
required to take out special permits. 



New Klamath Fishing Resort— Spring Creek, on the 
Klamath Indian reservation, is to be made into a 
fishing resort next season. R. C. Spink, the official 
Indian trader at Klamath agency, has secured a 
five-year lease from the government of lands on 
both sides of the creek, including the choicest camp- 
both sides of the creek, including the choicest camp- 
ing and fishing grounds. He will erect 20 or 30 tent 
houses and a large dining room to accommodate 
anglers, and will keep an agent in Klamath Falls to 
arrange transportation. 

There is no better trout stream on the Pacific Coast 
it is claimed, than Spring Creek, but heretofore it 
has been almost inaccessible on account of being 
in the ownership of the Indians. 

Marine Conflict — At Catalina Island, in Avalon 
bay, one evening last week an exciting contest was 
witnessed, by a number of people, between a large 
blackfish and a bunch of seals. The big fish finally 
beat off his adversaries after killing several of them. 

o 

U. M. C. Again Wins. — 

At the big Spokane, Washington, shoot, held 
on December 8th and 9th, Mr. E. J. Chingren won 
the high gun over all by the splendid score of 383 
ex 400 shooting U. M. C. Acme shells. Mr. Chingren 
had the honor of beating Mr. Barkley, the well known 
Eastern expert who was high professional, by 13 
birds. Mr. Barkley's score was second to that of 
Mr. Chingren, and next to Barkley came Mr. Fred 
McBroom, who hung up a score of 367 ex 400, which 
was four birds ahead of the well known Frank Riehl. 
Both shot U. M. C. Magic shells. 

In passing, it is well to note that Mr. Chingren 
has the honor of winning the Amateur Average for 
the Pacific Northwest with a general average for 
the year of about 94 per cent. This is certainly a 
wonderful amateur average. He used U. M. C. shells 
exclusively all the year. Frank Riehl, the U. M. C- 
Remington representative, has the honor of winning 
the professional average for the Pacific Northwest 
for 1908. 

Mr. W. J. Rail]) of Portage, Wisconsin, made a 
splendid run of 27 live birds straight with his Rem- 
ington Pump gun and U. M. C. shells on Nov. 15th. 
He followed this with a score of 98 per cent on clay 
targets. The U. M. C.-Remington combination has 
claimed many valuable wins this year. 

Some of the best shooting of 1908 developed in the 
match between Mr. B. F. Elbert of Des Moines, and 
Mr. John Peterson of Randall for the Iowa State 
Championship trophy. Mr. Elbert, who won the 
Western Handicap, made the creditable score of 93 
out of 100, but Mr. Peterson beat him by four birds, 
scoring 97 ex 100, with his favorite U. M. C. shells. 

o 

Shoots Three Different Cartridges. 

Although the Winchester Model 1906 Repeating 
Rifle, made to shoot .22 Short caliber carl ridges only, 
sprang into instant favor and has had an enormous 
sale, to further popularize and extend the use of this 
handy little rifle, the Winchester Repeating Arms 
Co. have adapted it to shoot the three popular cart- 
ridges, .22 Short, .22 Long and .22 hong Rille. While 
the value of the rifle is thus materially increased, 
the price remains the same, namely, $10.50 list, less 
the dealer's discount. This made the Winchester 
Model 1906 the biggest value in a repeating rifle ever 
known, as it is made according to the regular Win- 
chester standard, which means that the materials, 
workmanship and shooting qualities are the best 
possible. It is a take down, made with 20-Inch barrel 
and weighs only five pounds. For a lady or boy, it is 
just about right In size and weight; although on 
account of its low price, handiness, and strong and 
accurate shooting qualities, it is also widely used by 
men. For an all-around rifle for small game, killing 
cripples when shooting ducks from a blind, and 
target shooting at a low price, you cannot do better 
than the Winchester Model 1906. 

o 

Subscribe for The Breeder and Sportsman. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



THE FARM 




CURING MEATS. 



After trimming nicely, salt down, do 
not bury it in salt. After it has taken 
salt from five to six weeks, owing to 
the weather and size of your hogs or 
meat, then take up and wash clean. 
Put it in sweet brine made of brown 
sugar aud sorghum molasses. Let it 
stay in sweet brine from four to eight 
days owing to how cold the weather is. 
Then take it up and let it drain a day 
and smoke it. I have sold my side 
meat for 12% cents per pound and it 
was retailed out for 17 cents per 
pound. When butchering or killing 
hogs I use block and tackle, stand 
scalding barrel upright, scald one-half 
of hog at a time, change ends and 
scald other half. One man can life a 
300-pOUnd hog easy with block and 
tackle. When sausage meat is cut up 
into strips put down layer of meat in 
tub, then salt, pepper and sage, then 
another layer of meat and so on until 
you get through, then grind and it is 
mixed and seasoned well together, 
then fry your sausage and spare ribs 
just like you were going to eat them 
and put them in tin quart cans, pour 
lard over until you fill the can, then 
seal up tight. Any time of the year 
the same way." 1 do not want any salt- 
peter in my meat. — W. H. Smith. 

In sticking the hog, care should be 
taken to run the knife straight in so 
as to sever one of the jugular veins. 
If the point is allowed to project side- 
wise, it is apt to penetrate the shoul- 
der and leave a blood clot which large- 
ly destroys its value. One does not 
need a long knife as there is no ne- 
cessity of penetrating into the vital 
organs, simply sever the jugular veins. 
In scalding, some experience comes 
in play in getting the water at just the 
right temperature. The practical man 
pays no attention to a thermometer. 
He has learned by experience that 
water can be too hot as well as too 
cold. As a matter of fact, if the water 
is too hot and the hair is "set," harm 
has been done that can not be reme- 
died; while if the water is too cold no 
harm is done and the water can then 
be raised to the proper temperature. 
A little experience is really better 
than a thermometer. A successful 
scald is the all important thing in 
properly dressing the hog. When this 
is successful, the hair can be removed 
with a common candlestick scraper 
with very little difficulty. ' With a 
poor scald, one has to resort to the 
practice of shaving, which is not de- 
sirable. After the hair is removed 
the carcass should be thoroughly 
washed. The balance of the dressing 
can hardly be explained on paper. 
One really needs an object lesson to 
become thoroughly adept at it. — J. P. 
Flanders. 

Hutchering Hogs — Two methods are 
employed — knocking down with an ax 
and bleeding. While bleeding has its 
advantage and is practiced to a great 
extent, yet for quick work the ax is 
an invaluable tool. A hog, if struck 
right, is instantly stunned so that 
sticking is made easy. When merely 
bleeding is resorted to, two men are 
needed. The hog is turned square on 
its back and while one man stands 
across the hog's body and holds its 
two front legs in a folded position, the 
other cuts a slit through the fat only 
about six inches long. Now, there are 
two arteries leading to the head, 
which come close together at a point 
between the front legs. These ar- 
teries are to be cut, not the heart. 
The hog will give one squeal and then 
again will apparently feel no pain. 
It is best to overturn the hog after 
being stuck and let him walk around, 
so that the blood will have a better 
chance to flow out. When sticking, 
the knife should be held rigid, so that 
the .point will not be run into either 
shoulder instead of cutting the ar- 
teries. A knife with a strong blade 
eight inches long is about right. — W. 
R. Ritchey. 

o 

FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE. 



The origin of the outbreak of the 
foolh and mouth disease that has 
wrought havoc with the slaughter bus- 
iness during the last few weeks, has 
been officially traced to a car of cat- 



GOOD ONES FOR SALE. 

Ili-rlx-rf Dillon. No. IM'. jl. r.-yca r-old 
Chestnut stallion hy Sidney Dillon, dam 
Lizettc by Abdullah WUkes, sound, has 
shown miles in '1AG, quarters In 32V4 
seconds, eighths in 16 seconds. One of 
the best prospects In California. If not 
sold will be leased for the breeding or 
racing season, or both, of 1909 to a 
responsible party. 

l.eta Dillon. H-year-old filly by Her- 
bert Dillon, No. 44624, dam Electa by 
Escort, second dam Huth by Stelnway, 
perfectly sound, can show a 2:20 gait 
at the trot. 

< orniim <;irl. the great yearling 
pacer by Luring, No. 45142, dam Electa 
by Kscnrt, second dam Huth by Stein- 
way, paced a mile in 2:27% in third po- 
sition on the Wuudland track last 
August. Paces quarters in 33V* sec- 
unds, eighths in 16 seconds; perfectly 
sound, and entered in Can Held Stakes 
for 1909 and 1910; wears neither hob- 
bles nor boots. 

Ko.vc/ellii, 3-year-old filly by Falrose, 
dam Nora S. by Sable Wilkes, dam 
of Marvin Wilkes; perfectly sound; 
never trained but trotted a mile in 2:53, 
last quarter in 3914 seconds a few 
weeks after being taken out of the 
pasture to be broken. Price $300. 

Pedro, brown gelding, 4-year-old, 
by Loring. No. 45142, dam Ruth by 
Bteinway. Just being broken but shows 
better than a 3 minute Kait in breaking 
cart. A great prospect. Address, 

P. \. i n \n > . Red mull. Cat. 



For Sale. 

DBSRB1 DIRECT, pacer, blk. stalliun, 
6 years old, 16 hands. Sired by CIiiim. 
Derby SlM. First dam by Direct lr*6%. 

Second dam by Echo, sire of dam uf 
Direct 2:05%. 

This is a handsome, well-made horse 
and a fast natural pacer. Was worked 
a little as a three-year-old and stepped 
a mile In 2:19, last quarter in :31. 
Myrtha W., the only one of his foals 
ever trained, paced a half in 1:09 as a 
two-year-old. Can be seen at the 
Pleasanton race track at any time. 
For further particulars and price, 
write 

E. 8. PARKER, 

IMeiiMiinton, Cal* 

Two Standard Bred Stallions FOR SALE. 

On»- by Charles Derby, six years old, 
has paced miles in 2:12 1 ,4, first-class 
individual, thoroughly broken, kind 
to drive. 

One by MfKinney, weighs 1 2 T> 
pounds, high-class and handsome ani- 
mal In every respect. 

The dams of both of the above horses 
are registered for three generations 
back and are producers of speed. These 
two stallions are not only highly bred, 
but desirable animals in every respect. 
Will be sold cheap. For full particulars 
as to breeding, etc., address A. G. 
SHI I'PEE, 247 W. Fremont St., Stock- 
ton, Cal. 



DICTATUS 2:17 TO LEASE. 

Sire of Funston 2:08%, Dictatress 
2:0S%, Ama A. 2:1014, and nine more in 
the list, including those speedway 
champions Little Kick 2 : 1 1 1 i and Kitty 
D. 2:11%, both of which have beaten 
2:10. Dictatus is one of the best bred 
horses in America and for his oppor- 
tunities one of the greatest speed sires 
on the Coast. 

Is in good shape and ready for ser- 
vice. 

Apply to 
CLARENCE DAY. 

1462 Page Street, 

San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

The good matinee trotter Bob In- 
gersoll 2:14%, by Nutwood Wilkes, is 
offered for sale. He is in better shape 
than ever before, and is fat and all 
right. Also a black mare, three years 
old, weight 1075, 15.3 hands, and a nice 
pacer: sired by Alto Genoa 2:14%, dam 
by Alex Button; is gentle for a lady to 
drive. Also two other good, gentle, 
city-broke driving horses. 

For particulars, apply to 

FRANK LIEGINGER, 
24 West Weber ave., Stockton. 



Cood Ones for Sale. 

Standard and registered stallions by McKin- 
ney. brood mares, high-class roadsters and colts 
at very reasonable prices. I am closing out all 
my horses at private sale. Am offering some of 
the best bred and best individuals on the Coast. 
Write for particulars. Address. 

THOMAS SMITH, 

1021 Georgia St.. Vallejo, Cal. 



Percheron Stud Colts for Sale. 

The undersigned offers for sale two high-grade 
Pereheron-Norman draft yearling stud colts, a 
black aud a bay. weighing respectively 1370 and 
1 120 pounds. For prices and particulars address 

J. K. MONTGOMERY. 

Davis, Cal. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



Welghe 1,000 pounds, Is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 
9. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 



FAIRMONT I 
Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The most superbly situated Ho- 
tel in the world — overlooking 
the Bay of San Francisco and 

City. 

Headquarters Army and Navy. 

The Social Center of City. 

Convenient to Business and 
Theater Sections. Reached by 
street cars from every direction. 
Only 5 minutes from ferry. 
Single Room with Bath, $2.50, 

$3, $3.50, $4, $5. $6. $7, $10. 
Suits with Bath, $10.00 upwards. 

Under MannKement of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

John C. Klrkpatrlck, Manager. 



'tTESTOB" "IMPOETED" "E07AL UESTOS' 




" The Original Egyptian" 



PETER SAXE A SON, 911 Steiner St., 
San Francisco, Cal., Importers, Breed- 
ers and Dealers for past thirty years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, 
Hogs. High-class breeding stock. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS "-QU INTO 
HERD. — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-S-4. Registered cattle of 
beef and milking families for sale. 
Write us what you want. 
HOWARD CATTLE CO., Sun Mateo. 

GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-GLIDE 

FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 
Glide Grade — % French and \i Spanish 
Merino. 

— Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams. — 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 297, Home Telephone, 
Sacramento, Cal. Dixon, Cal. 

W. HIGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office with E. Stewart & Co. 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

WANTED. 



A thoroughly experienced young man w ishes a 
position as instructor at a riding academy, or 
with stock farm breaking and lining polo ponies. 

Address, W. C, care of Breeder and Sportsman. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers la PAPER 

1400-1460 4th St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Oregon. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— In— 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco. 

STUD BOOKS FOR SALE. 

The first four volumes uf Bruce's Ameri- 
can Stud Book, elegantly bound in 
Morocco, w ill be sold cheap for cash or 
exchanged for later volumes. 
Address this office. 

BREEDER and SPORTSMAN. 

READ THE 
BREEDER and SPORTSMAN 



RACING! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

OAKLAND RAGE TRACK 



First Race at 1:40 p. m. 

Six or more races each week day, 
rnln or shine. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 20 
minutes until 1:40 P. M. No smoking 
in the last two cars, which are re- 
served for ladies and their escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

620 Octavia St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 2074. San Francisco, Cal 

WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

1153 Golden Gate Are. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



HI IICHOII) HOOFING. 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
BONESTEI.L »V CO.. 
lis to 124 Flrsl sr., «. iM i Fn Isco, Cal. 

JOHN BARDUHN 

Successor to Kavanagh vt Barduhn 

THE PALACE HOTEL TAILORS 

has removed to his permanent quarters 
No. 7 Sutter St., near Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 



Shoe Boils, Capped 
Hock, Bursitis 

are bard to cure, yet 



BINE 



ABSof 




will remove them and leave no blem- 
ish. Docs not blister or remove" 
the hair. Cures any puff or swelling. Horse can 
be worked. 12.00 per bottle, dollvered.Book 6 D free. 

ABSORRINE. JR., (mankind, fl.OO bottle.) 
For Boils. Uralses, Old Sores, Swellings. Goitre, 
Varicose Vein«. Vnr'eo-ltieq. ATlsyi Pain. 
W. F. YOUNG, P D F.. 54 Monmouth St., Springfield, Mass. 
For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. ; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore. ; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal. ; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



/ 



CAPSULES 



Z 



IN c 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND 8PORTSMAN 



13 



tie shipped from Detroit, which con- 
tained animals inoculated with the 
virus of the disease which had been 
imported from abroad. While the dis- 
ease has been and is common enough 
in Continental countries, this country 
has always been singularly free from 
it, and the outbreak was difficult to 
account for. 

One of the first things the Bureau 
of Animal Industry undertook, how- 
ever, was to try to discover the origin 
of the present epidemic, and it finally 
succeeded in tracing it to Detroit, 
where a large wholesale drug firm has 
its headquarters. Here it was discov- 
ered that the firm in question had im- 
ported some of the virus, and had un- 
dertaken to make cultures on live an- 
mals. In some way, not explained, this 
artificial infection got beyond bounds 
and has spread to all parts of the 
country. 

The Secretary of Agriculture, while 
having ample authority over diseased 
animals, has, it appears, no power to 





PONCA CITY, Okla.. 12-4-08. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 
DEAR .SIRS: — I have mailed you to- 
day a photograph of "Mayflower," my 
high-class show mare and trotter; first 
prize winner at International Horse 
Show, Kansas City. Then made a 
start at Udall, Kans., 2:28%, with less 
th:in thirty days' work. 

When she came home from Kansas 
City she had a had bowed tendon and I 
thought she would never be of any 
account for speed or showing and 1 
bred her to Symboiler. I saw your ad- 
vertisement of "Save-The-Horse." I 
sent and got a bottle and began using 
it, and she improved so fast that I 
began working her in August, and com- 
menced racing her the middle of Sep- 
tember. Gave her the mark of 2:28%, 
and during this time three-quarters of 
a bottle of '"Save-The-Horse" cured her 
sound and well. I have been asked by 
horsemen what I used and 1 told them. 
This mare is known by a great many 
horsemen in Kansas City and Okla- 
homa. I shall never be without "Save- 
The-Horse." Respectfully, 

WM. GRAVENS. 



"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpln, 
splint, shoe boil, wlndpuff, injured ten- 
dons, and all lameness, without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

S5 Per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as 
the best legal talent could make it. 
Send for copy and booklet. 

At Drugglxts and Dealers or Expreai 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Formerly Troy IV. Y. 
n. E. NEWELL, 
r.O Dayo Vlntn Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



Bony Growths 

ruin horse values. You can remove 
all abnormal growths, leaving no 
scar or blemish, with the old reliable 

Kendall's 

SPAVIN CURE 

Horsemen using it 10 
to 40 years say it lias no 
equal as a cure for 
Spavin, Ringbone, 
Curb, Splint, Lameness. 

"I have QMd Kendall's 
Spavin Cure for lll'toen 
yeursand It never fulls." 
C. I>. Kornliee, 
BUllngslqy, Ala. 

$1 a Bottle; 6 for $5. At all drug- 
gists. Get it and be ready for emer- 
gencies. Book, "Treatise on the 
Horse," free at drug stores or from # 
Dr. It. J. Kendall Co.. Enosburg Falls. VI. 




prevent the importation of virus or 
cultures of diseased cattle. He there- 
fore expresses his intention of apply- 
ing to Congress for authority "to pre- 
vent the introduction of destructive an- 
imal diseases by the importation of 
virus or cultures or organisms causing 
such diseases." 



Lice 

Sample FREE 

(Write for It.) 

IT WILL 00 THE WORK AND 
YOO WILL WANT MORE. 



TOBACCO DUST 

A positive and recognized remedy for 
poultry lice. The acknowledged sure 
ingredient for sheep dip. Guaranteed 
full strength, absolutely fresh, and 
as good as any in any market. 

Sure death to lice on 

HORSES, SHEEP, POULTRY, 

and all other kinds of live stock. 

Quotations f. o. b. San Francisco. All 
shipments may be returned within 10 
days and your money refunded if our 
Dust does not please you in every way. 
Samples mailed postpaid upon request. 

In 100 lb. lots, only 4' c. per lb. 
In 300 " " " 4c. " " 
In 500 " " " " " 

Send a postal and get sample 
Tobacco Dust and our three com- 
plete new catalogues postpaid. 

It pays to buy by mail for cash. 
Our prices are the lowest Cut Rates 
and we prove it. 

The Owl Drug Co., 

Mail Order Dept., 611 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

Mention this paper. 



BUILT FOR. BUSINESS 



CARTS 



ELEGANT NEW 
CART CATALOGUE 
NOW READY 




J.J.DEAL& SON 

JON ESVILLE. MICH. 



BAKER & HAMILTON, Agts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, SACRAMENTO AND 
I, OS ANGELES, CAL. 



THREE STALLIONS TO LEASE. 

One son and two Krandsons of McKin- 
ney 2:11 %, all out of Kilt-edge dams. 
These stallions are all Hi hands, of (rood 
color, and each has fine large coltrf to 
show. They will be leased for the 
stud season of 1 9011 on liberal terms, hut 
lessees will be required to give satis- 
factory security. For terms and pedi- 
grees, address 

A. B. HODMAN, Owner, 
Woodland, California. 




THE ARABIAN STALLIONS 



WILL 
STAND THE 

SEASON 



Introductory Offer to Breeders: 



Mares sent for and accommodated at foaling time. 

Write (or particulars to 



EL RANCHO DE LAS ROSAS DESERT ARABIAN STUD, 



The FOUNDATION BLOOD OF 
ALL GOOD HORSE STOCKS 



thoroughbred and standard bred 
in every case trace back to it. 
Even the Mustang owes his en- 
durance to the Arab strain. The 
Arab gives speed over long dis- 
tances, draft power, bottom, do- 
cility, intelligence, beauty of 
coat and conformation. The 
half-Arab is an ideal combin- 
ation saddle and driving horse, 
suitable for the show-ring or 100 
miles a day. 



ALMA, 

Santa Clara County, Cal. 



The Last Chance 

for California Breeders 

To Send Mares to ZOMBRO 2:11 

McKINNEY'S GREATEST SON AND GREATEST SIRE OF HIS AGE. 

Zombro will be taken East next Spring and will not be returned to California. 
He will make a fall and winter season at my place, No. 3727 Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. Zombro leads all trotting bred stallions as a sire of extreme speed 
this year, and his get have won more money than the get of any sire on this 
Coast. He has been the leading Pacific Coast sire for three years — 1906, 1907 and 
1908. Sixteen of his get have entered the 2:30 list this year, and while Bingen 
and Peter the Great each have one more in 2:30 list. Zombro leads all stallions 
as a sire of new 2:10 and 2:15 performers. He has four new ones in 2:10, three of 
them trotters, six new 2:15 performers, and seven new 2:20 performers. He now 
has eight in 2:10, 16 in 2:15 and 24 in 2:20, out of a total of 48 in the 2:30 list. 
Half of his standard performers have records below 2:20. He is the greatest speed 
sire of the age. Write me for terms. 

GEO. T. DECKERS, Owner, 
3727 S. Figueroa St., Los* Angeles, Cal. 

KINNEY ROSE (trial) 2:13 i 

By McKinney 2:11 dam Colden Rose by Falrose; 
second dam Lady Harper by Alaska : third dam by Algona; 
fourth dan by Oddfellow, thoroughbred. 

Kinney Rose is a dark bay stallion, stands 15.3 hands 
and weighs 1200 lbs. He is a splendid horse in every re- 
spect, handsome, intelligent, of good disposition, and in the 
opinion of many good judges is one- of the fastest trotting 
sons of the great McKinney. 

There are but two colts in Kinney Rose's first crop and 
they are coming two. Both of those colts can show a 2:40 
gait and that with limited handling. At a meeting held by 
the Woodland Driving Club, Nov. 29th, Kinney II.. a yearling 
by Kinney Rose, won the yearling stake taking the first and third heats in 2:50 
and 2:51 (the fastest heats trotted by a yearling in a race in 1908), being nosed 
out the second heat in 2:5] and this 7 weeks after being taken out of pasture. 
This colt 3 or 4 days before Thanksgiving was driven a mile by Det Bigelow on 
the Woodland track in 2:42. 




Season of '09 at the CHICO RACE TRACK. 



Terms: $35 for the Season. Return privilege 



The Norman Stallion Tom Terms: $15 — $20 to insure 

8 years old, weighs 1,800 lbs. A first-class individual and very active horse. 

Yearlings by both of the above stallions will be at the track on exhibition. 

Address, CHRIS HASHAGEN, Manager, Chlco, Cal. 

WM. HASHAGEN, Owner. 



Athasham 



Race Rec. 2:09^. 
Reg. No. 45026. 



A Game Race 
Horse in the Stud 




s Li.:!, weigh 

2:27 (sire of The Donna 2:07%, Athasham 2:09%. Sue 2:12, Lister- 
ine 2:13% and 8 others In 2:80) : dam, the great brood mare Cora 
Wickersham (also dam of Xogi (3) 2:17%, (4) 2:10>g. winner of it- 
s' ear-old trotting division bleeders Futurity l'.">7and Occident and 
Stanford Stakes of same year), by .Iunio2:22!4(sireof darns of Ceo. 
G. 2:06/4, etc.). Athasham has a great future before him as a 
sire. He is bred right and made right, and lia* every <iiinlilic». 
tion one can expect in a sire. Ho has been timed in 2:00% in a 
race, and his courage is uniiuestioned. 

He H ill make the Season oi 1909 al Orchard Farm, Fresno, 

Cal., for a Fee of $25. Approved mares 

For further particulars address this place. 

D. L. BACHANT, R. R. 1, Fresno, Cal. 



Milton Gear ™ 



Sired by Harry Cear WJ (sire of Harry Logan 
2:12)4, etc.l by Kcho 102 (sire 10 in 2:30 list. II pro 
dueing sous. 22 producing diiuglitersi, firsl dam 
I.ulu x. by Dawn 6707, Record 2:18%; 2nd dam 
Alice by lirowns McClellan. 

Will nmke the SEASON OF 1909 at the 



Fee: $25 the Season. 

For further particulars 
apply to or address 



Usual return 
privilege. 



Fresno Fair Grounds 

J. DEPOISTER, Fresno, Cal. 



McKINNEY, 2:11%. 

Sire of 20 in 2 : l0, 49 in 2:15, 66 in 2:20, 100 in 2:30. 
Sire of the sires of 94 in 2:30 (17 in 2:10) and 
Dams of 5 in 2:10. 

GREATEST PRODUCER AND TYPICAL SIRE THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. 

McKinney stallions are few and arc worth from eight times his fee 
UP- Book to others any time - to McKinney while you may. 
Only a few outside mares will be accepted. 

SgiiE J5ijp iEmptrr (fJttij iFarma, new u ?ork. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



Free hides, free leather and free 
shoes seem to be foreshadowed in the 
coming tariff bill. The independent 
tanners have lined up to demand that 
the fifteen per cent tariff on hides be 
removed on the ground that it benefits 
the meat trust only and say that un- 
less they are given a wider field in 
which to purchase raw material they 
will be driven out of business within 
three years. When the tanners were 
asked whether if they were given free 
hides they would be willing to have 
leather placed on the free list they 
responded in the affirmative. Then 
along came the shoe men with a cry 
for free hides. They were asked 
whether they would consent to free 
shoes if given free leather and free 
hides. They really want a little duty 
on shoes, but agreed to free shoes 
if given free raw material. This means 
that they would then contract their 
hides in South America at a fraction 
of the price they would pay for west- 
ern hides while the freight rates be- 
tween here and Massachusetts would 
shut us out. 

o 

The packers and dealers are con- 
stantly making a demand for pure bred 
hogs. The pork industry, like many 
others has come to the point of spec- 
ialization. The market is calling on 
the swine raisers to furnish as finished 
hogs animals fitted for a variety of 
purposes. A half century ago this 
country did not possess very many pure 
bred hogs. The western pioneer farm- 
ers corralled almost any kind of ani- 
mals which had the resemblance of 
hogs and used them for pork. After 
becoming domesticated they naturally 
developed into more blocky animals 



carrying less bone and more flesh. As 
civilization gained a better grasp on 
the central part of the United States, 
some of the best breeds of hogs were 
imported from Europe until today we 
have them by the millions. 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



For 



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ig.soothing and 
healing, end for all Old 

t HO Wound i, 'ns 
Exterior Cancerf , Boil* 
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and therefore no harm 
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REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

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and all of the following: 
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Outing $;ilMJ..*1.50 

Bohemian 1 50.. .75 

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Nat'l HomeJournal .50.. .25 
Woman's Nat'l Daih 1.00...65 
W Weekly Practical 

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W Weekly Produce 

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M Nat'l Swine 

Magazine 1.00 
M Ann. Bee Jour'l 1.00 
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S-M Kimballs Dairy 

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M Southern Fruit . 

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Metropolitan- 1.50 

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D Stands for "Daily." W for "Weekly" S M for "Semi-Monthly." M for "Monlhly." 



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your magazine ran be 
changed from old to new 
address. 


If you are already a sub- 
scriber to any or all of these 
magazines your subscription 
wll be extended one year. 


If you don't want all of tin 
magazines sent to one ad- 
dress, you can split the club 
and have them sent to any 
number of different ad- 
dresses. 


Always remit by Express. 
P. O. Order or by Registered 
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always 10c for exchange. 


These offers are as good to 
old a s well a s new sub- 
scribers. 



REFERENCE: NORTH MEMPHIS SAVINGS BANK. MEMPHIS; OR AN Y 
BVSINESS HOVSE IN MEMPHIS. OR ANY MAGAZINE IN OVR CLVBS 



Always Order Club by Name, and Send all Orders Direct to 

JONES BROTHERS COMPANY 

600-606 Goodwyn Institute, Dept. 8 3 6 MEMPHIS. TENN. 

WE WANT AGENTS AND REPRESENTATIVES ^^i^SS^SSS!^ 

upward If you can secure the orders. 



The Stallion Number 

—OF THE— 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

;;\n\\\\\\\\s\\\\\n\\\\\\\\«>n\\\\\\\nvv\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ 



It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news 
and articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to ' reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 



As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many 
owners are not ready to say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should havo 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

New Edition of John Splan's Book 

"Life With the Trotter" 

Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

"Life With the Trotter (rives us a cloar insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. B&KKDEB and Sportsman. P. (). Drawer 447, San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 




Makes Horses Sound— Keeps Them So 

In over 100 000 stables horses with bad lees and other troubles, such as Distem- 
per, Founder and Colic, are made sound and kept in prime shape with 

111' 11L i » mr-tmm • Cure« Spawn LameneM, I url,. splint, Sprain, 

TllttlaO'C KllYll™ Bunches. Send for the proof*. Can't exper inl 

J. Ut MfC 9 JCj11A.11 rjae Tattle'8 and be aura. Ask also for rattle* 

Worm Powders Condition Powders and Hoot Ointment. At dealers or by express. 
V.iu.ol. V.uVln.r, Book Fr... The best guide for horsemen In .11 emergencies 
Write for It today. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR CO, 52 Beverly SI, Boston, Mass. 

MACK & CO., Kan Kranclseo, and V. W. BBAUN, Los Angeles; California Agents. 



) 



Saturday, January 9, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



EARTH'S WONDERS 



r 


i 


1 


Santa fe 




■ 





Yosemite— 

Open the year 'round. The quick way ifl Santa 
Fe to Merced; thence Yosemite Valley Railroad. 



Grand Canyon— 

The biggest thing in the world. El Tovar hotel 
on brink of Canyon. 
Under Fred Harvey management, one of the finest 
hotels in southwest. — Our folders tell. 
H. K. GREGORY, A. G. p. A.. San Francisco. JOHN. J. BYRNE, A. I'. T. M„ Los Angeles 



■<»»>: 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



-SOLD BY- 




XV. A. Sayre Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller & TaUerson San Diego, Cal. 

J. G. Read A Bro Ogden, Utah 

Jubinville & Nance Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Kodder Stockton, Cal. 

Win. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

V. Koch . San Jose, Cal. 

Keystone Bros San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Iteedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 100G. Serial Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 



418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



IBfflU 



No road too rough. Has 
cushion tires and carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding. and does away 
with all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with Pneumatic tires. 



W. J. KENNEY, 



Sales agent for 
California. 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 

53I Valencia Street, San Francisco 



AXWORTHY, 2:15^. \^ N GT °;rKY*' 

Sire of 59 in 2:30, including 

World's greatest trotting mare World's greatest three-year-old 

Hamburg Belle, 2:04% Gen. Watts (3), 2:06% 

If you wish to book - be quick while his book is stiM open. 
For particulars, mention this paper and address, 

®hf jEmptrr (Hitp jFarmB, Lexington, Ky. 



Quinns Ointment 



Will Make, A Horse Over; 

will put Bornd legs under him nnd 

w ill save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is tin 
Standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints. Wiinlpuffs and all 
the various lumps and hunches of like kind. Km p it always on 
hand and you will he prepared when trouhle comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use ii. 

N. T.. 



lWr II. IT. ( Inrk. Fro'lnnlfl. 
Qu nn'K Olnlmonl (him Jei-eil I v In 

■.moved a curb a <l thomuiitapln 
liur.-e'a ley it* us hiiiooIIi uh ever." 



wrltfH: "Tho lioltln of 
fOII nlioiit two verimago 
nii ditl It for gou.l. Mjr 



Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail' 
Write f. r circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY C COMPANY, WHITEHALL, K. Y. , 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clahrough.flolcher <!fc Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phon. Temporary 1883. 5 , Market ^ ^ fr^^ 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

Smokeless Shot Gun Powder 

THE OLD-TIME FAVORITE 

Hard Grain, 



Smokeless, 
Uniform, 



Clean Burning 



Stability Guaranteed 

Loaded in All First-Class Shells 



Ask Your Dealer for 



"New Schultze" 



A Powder for the Most Critical ! 

MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS. 



E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 

Stallion Folders, 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars an to place, terms, fee, description ami breeding as 
far as you know and wk will no THE REST. 

Proof submitted before tbe work is printed. Half-tone Pictures 
made from Photographs. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS $1.00 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

Pacific Hid";., Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 




TALLION OWNER 



If In need of anything In the lino of Stallion C;irds, compiled and 
printed. Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Hor^c Hooks 
Stallion Sorvlco Hooks, Horse Cuts In stock ami made from photos, 



Ilreeillng Hobbles, Stallion Supports, I'ngnators anil all Bpectalttel 
for Stallions. : : ; Writu for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 9, 1909. 



Fine 

Harness. 



The Best Horse Boots 




t^JiORSE BOOTS 



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' Pemi/igton . 



AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



NO SLIDE TO WORK 

with the left hand. Right hand pulls trigger. Hecoil eject*, rocks and 
reloads. Solid breech protection against "Mow hacks." Safety just before 
trigger linger prevents accidental discharge. 1'ull line of double guns if 
you prefer. 

The Ideal Duck Cun. List Price $40 and Upwards. 

Remington Arms Company 

llion, New York. Agency, 313 Broadway, New York. 



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WINCH£STEK 

.22 CALIBER REPEATING RIFLE 

The Model 1906 Handling Three Cartridges 



Q ; no 



This Winchester repeater, 
Short, .22 Long or .22 Long 
value in a rifle ever offered, 
as Winchester rifles of large 
reliable and well finished, 
small compass, making it 
kit. The list price is o 

Winchester Guns and Amman 

WINCHESTER REPEATIN 



which is now made to handle either .22 
Rifle Rim Fire Cartridges, is the biggest 
It is made with the same skill and care 
r caliber, which means that it is accurate, 
It takes down easily and packs in a 
a handy adjunct to any sportsman's 
nly $10.50 and it retails for less. 

ition — the Red W Brand — are sold everywhere. 

G ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



FOR FIELD and TRAP SHOOTING 
Hold All the Best Records 

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None "Just as Good" 

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CARRIED BY THE BEST TRADE 

SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 

San Francisco. 




VOLUME LIV. No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAI,., SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 1909. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Year. 




2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



$ 5,000 



REOPENED 



GUARANTEED. 



$ 5,000 



The State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 1 



GUARANTEED. 



Foals of Mares Covered in 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$2900 for Trotting Foals. - 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



$2100 for Pacing Foals. 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento Cal 

Entries to close February 1, '09. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

Mare was bred. 

FORTWO- YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1911 



TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS 
TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS 



$800 
500 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR-THREE-YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1912 

THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS . . . $2000 
THREE-YEAR-OLD PACERS . . . . 1 500 

ENTRANCE! AM) PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February ], 1909, when name, color, description of marc and stallion bred to must be given- $5 July 1 
1909- $f> December 1, 1909; $10 on Yearlings. February !, 1910; $10 on Two-Year-Olds. February 1, 1911; $10 on Three-Year-Olds, February 1 1912. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start 
in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominator* must designate when milking payments to wtnrt whether the home entered lit a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colt* that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three-year-old divisions. 

l or Entry Blanks and further particulars, address the Secretary. 

CONDITIONS : 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2-in-3, and for Three-Year-Olds, 3-in-5. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three-Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If n mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or If either the mare or foal die* before February I. 1910, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nnmlnntion or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid In or contracted for. In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred In 1B08. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. Tills Association is liable for $5,000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Write for Entry Blanks to 



B. F. RUSH, 

President. 



J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 



Owners of Live Stock in California 
Should Insure in Their Own Associatinn, 



The California Mutual Live 
Stock Insurance Association 



Because 

It is the only institution of the kind organized under the laws of 
California with the home office in this State 

VVe insure live stock against death from disease, fire, lightning, 
tornado, cyclones and every casualty; also through accident which may 
necessitate the death of any animal. 

Losses are paid promptly without discount and without unnecessary 
delay. 

We have a guaranty deposit under the control of the State Treasurer 
for the protec tion of our members and policy holders. 

There la $100 of values lost to farmers by death of stock, by disease 
and accident, where $1 is lost by fire. 

\V« have no dividends or profits paid to idle office holders. 

The business of the Association is conducted as economically as is 
consistent with good management, and the earnings are divided among 
the policy holders. 

This is an age of Mutual Insurance, and it Is true the cheapest and 
strongest companies in the I'nitol States to-day are composed of and 
managed by the policy holders, who are farmers and stockmen, as has 
been demonstrated in the East. 

The directors and officers ore elected annually by the policy holders. 

WHY PAY LARGE PREMIUMS FOR PROFIT TO EASTERN 
COMPANIES WHEN YOU CAN CO-OPERATE WITH YOUR FELLOW 
FARMER AND STOCKMAN AND SECURE YOUR INSURANCE AT 

COST? 

We are receiving daily many testimonials 

from policy holders whose claims have been and are being promptly and 
satisfactorily settled. 

References : 

Oakland Bank of Savings, Oakland. Cal.; National Bank of California 
Los Angeles, Cal.; Secretary Savings Bank. I.ns Angeles. Cal.. or anv 
reliable bank in the Stale. 

M. L. WRIGHT, Pres. |. A. WRIGHT, Secy. 

Home Office: 270-271-272 Bacon Building, 12th St. and Broadway, 
Phone Oakland 3990. OAKLAND, Cal. 

Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 
Breeder and Sportsman 



Robes and Blankets 

Of all descriptions and at prices which can not fail to meet 
the generous approval of the most fastidious. 

Our Line is Unsurpassed on the Coast. 



( 'rushed Mohair rol>es in sizes from ">2 by 00 inches to 54 by 84 
inches; selling from $10 to $:io. 

Imported steamer robes in sizes from 52 by 72 inches to ">4 by S4 
inches; selling from $•> to $4o. 

Imported wool rolies in sizes from 52 by 7"> inches and upwards, 
selling from S4 to *2.">. 

Also a fine line of English Meltons at prices that will please yon. 



Fremont 



at 



Mission 




TALLION OWNER 

If Id need of anything in the lino of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Books 
Stallion Service ISooks, Horse Cuts in stock and made from photos. 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, l'regnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms — One Tear $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months $1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer'» 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE STATE AND COUNTY FAIRS with their 
programs of horse races, as they are now conducted 
in the Eastern and Middle States and in our neigh- 
boring States of Oregon and Washington, have ef- 
fectually solved the question as to whether horse 
racing can be held without betting. In some of 
the States where these successful meetings are held 
the laws prevent books being made or pools sold 
on the results of any contest, but in others the As- 
sociations themselves took the initiative years ago 
and by abolishing betting and liquor from their 
grounds, have succeeded in increasing the atend- 
ance ten fold and making a financial success where 
failure had been the rule under the old plan. The 
editor of this journal had a very interesting talk 
one day this week with the well known horseman 
Gil Curry, who surely cannot be accused of being a 
reformer, in the sense in which this word is often 
used when the prohibition of race betting is up 
for discussion, as Mr. Curry has made many a bet 
in his life on both trotters and runners, and would 
not be averse now to placing a wager on any horse 
that he thought had a chance to win. But Mr. Curry 
is a man who recognizes that the horse breeding 
and training interests are greater than any system 
of gambling on speed contests, and having seen 
with his own eyes that racing can be conducted 
profitably and successfully without betting, he is 
ready to state that in his opinion the proper thing 
for the associations to do is to cater to the public 
instead of the gamblers, and give fairs and race 
meetings without betting. Mr. Curry says the mod- 
ern plan of a combined fair and race meeting with 
no betting and no booze, but with generous premiums 
for stock, good purses for harness horses and run- 
ners, and a lot of vaudeville attractions is a money- 
maker. At one half mile track in the Middle West 
where he attended a fair last year, there were 47,- 
000 persons on the grounds one afternoon, the turn- 
stiles showing that many paid admissions. At the 
Hamline fair as many as 93,000 have paid to enter 
the gates in one day, and the net cash profits of 
the week amounted to over forty thousand dollars. 
The races at these places attract the best horses in 
the country, and the purses are larger than were 
ever given when betting was the rule. Mr. Curry 
says he has been going to fairs and race meetings 
for thirty years, and has seen the meetings where 
gambling was permitted and the towns were wide 
open, all go down to failure, while at the same places 
under the new system they are nearly all paying 
a profit each year, while the horsemen are trotting 
and pacing for larger purses. At Allentown, Pa., 
the receipts are so large each year that the asso- 
ciation has voluntarily reduced the entrance fee to all 
purses to two per cent instead of five. What Mr. 
Curry says about the East and Middle West, our 
California trainers are saying about Salem and 
Portland, Oregon, and our own California State Fair 
is proving that more people will attend where bet- 
ting is prohibited than will go where it is allowed. 
This year, when the pavilion exhibit at Sacramento 
will be held inside Agriculture Park instead of two 
miles away as has been the case for years past, the 
chances are that the crowds will be the greatest 
in the history of the State Fair where no betting 
and no liquor selling has been permitted for the 
past two years. The fact is that the professional 
gamblers and the pool rooms and the continuous 
running meetings have caused horse racing to lose 
caste with the public where betting is permitted, 
while the wide-awake, enterprising and brainy men 
who conduct up-to-date fairs and race meetings have 



found that the abolition of gambling and liquor drink- 
ing at fair grounds has resulted in the crowds re- 
turning to the sport of racing, which every person 
with a healthy mind delights to see when they know 
it is conducted honestly and decently. 

o 

AN INFORMAL MEETING of the directors of 
the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Asso- 
ciation was held in this city at the office of the 
Breeder and Sportsman on Tuesday last, and a gen- 
eral discussion was held in regard to several mat- 
ters of interest to the owners of trotters and pacers 
on this Coast. There being no quorum present noth- 
ing definite was done, but a meeting of the board 
will soon be called and the program of the fall 
meeting announced. It is probable that this program 
will be ready for publication next week. It will 
be a liberal one, containing the usual large stakes 
for 2:20 trotters and 2:20 pacers, with a list of other 
class races made up to accommodate the horses that 
will be raced in California this year. Secretary 
Kelley has been in communication with the officials 
of the driving clubs in Southern California, and there 
is a probability that the breeders will give a meet- 
ing at San Bernardino, in June or July. The driving 
clubs at San Diego, Los Angeles, Riverside and 
Santa Ana have been considering the advisibility of 
giving an early circuit of harness meetings and the 
association at San Bernardino would be very pleased 
to have the meeting there given under the auspices 
of the Breeders Asosciation. In case the harness 
racing should start this year in Southern California, 
arrangements will be made to ship all northern 
horses that are entered in the events there from 
Pleasanton or Sacramento to Los Angeles free. The 
southern associations could do this at a very trifling 
expense by engaging special cars ror a certain date, 
whereas should each owner in this section go on 
his own hook as it were, the expense would be 
large for each stable of horses. The tracks and the 
weather in Southern California would insure good 
racing and fast time, and there is no doubt whatever 
but the atendance would be very large at every 
point. By next week we shall be able to furnish our 
readers with the program for the Breeders fall meet- 
ing to be held at some track in the central part of 
the State. With meetings at Salinas, Santa Rosa, 
Woodland, Marysville and Chico, in addition to the 
State Fair and the early meetings in Southern Cal- 
ifornia and the later meetings of the San Joaquin 
Valley circuit, there should be enough harness rac- 
ing in California this year to satisfy all who desire 
to train and race their trotters and pacers at home. 
The North Pacific Circuit will be greater than ever 
this year, as will be seen when the programs are an- 
nounced. 

o 

SUCCESSFUL MEETING AT ROCKLIN. 



One of the most successful meetings ever held 
under the auspices of the Rocklin Driving Club, 
was held at the Driving Park Association's track 
New Year's day. There were about 750 people in 
attendance, and this number would have been much 
greater had not the forenoon weather been so un- 
promising. The afternoon was beautiful, and the 
rains of the previous day had put the track in fine 
condition. The races started promptly at 1 o'clock. 
Folowing is a summary of results: 

Class A, mile heats, 2 in 3 — Mickey Fee, C. Kenna 
owner, took the first heat in 2:28; Advance, J. Petch 
owner, took the second and third heats, and the 
race; best time, 2:26V 2 ; Saddle Rock, M. N. Gaf- 
fert owner, third; Doc. Frazer, G. H. Frazer owner, 
third. 

Class B, mile heats, 2 in 3 — Frank Bates, Ed. 
Pfosi owner, won first heat in 2:47; Jewess, A. 
Levison owner, took second and third heats and 
race. Best time, 2:46. 

Class C, half-mile heats, 2 in 3— Lady S., Ben. 
Scribner owner, took first and second heats; time 
1:23. Laurel Bush, J. Correa, Jr. owner, second. 

Class D, half mile heats, 2 in 3— Etta Logan, R. 
T. Cook owner, took two straight heats; best time, 
1:18%. Derby Bell, Bert Frazer owner, second. 

Class E, half mile heat — Direct, W. L. Perry owner, 
took two straight heats; best time, 1:43%- Anetto 
H. E. Blackwell owner, second. 

Running race, half-mile dash — .loo, J. Veohmior 
owner, first; Snip, J. P. Whitney owner, second; 
Zelma, J. P. Whitney owner, third. This was the 
most exciting race of the day. The three horses 
run neck and neck the entire course, and came un- 
der the wire in one, two, three order a bare nose 
ahead. 

One-fourth mile dash — Brown Jug, H. E. Blackwell 
owner, first; Skip, John Freeman owner, second, and 
Joe Bush, H. E. Blackwell owner, third. 

o 

Lillian R. 2:04% and Alice Pointer 2:05% will both 
be trained by Mike McDavitt next season. An effort 
will be made to lower both records. Besides these 
some promising green youngsters by such sires a8 
Peter the Great 2:07%, Jay McGregor 2:07% and 
others will make up the stable. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



A. S. Kellogg, Fresno. — Secretary 28378, was sired 
by Director 2:17 (son of Dictator 113 and Dolly by 
Mambrino Chief 11,) dam Martin mare by Volunteer 
55 (son of Hambletonian 10 and Lady Patriot by 
Young Patriot), second dam Madam Mauk (dam of 
Nelly Grant 2:28%) by Frank Pierce, Jr., 485 (son of 
Frank Pierce) third dam Susan Jones, pedigree not 
traced. Lilith 2:22%, trotting, is a black mare, 
foaled 1892, by Secretary 28378, dam by Gen. Mc- 
Clellan, Jr., 17461, second dam Susie Rose (dam of 
Nelly R. 2:17%) by Sam McClellan, son of Gen. Mc- 
Clellan 144, third dam by Hector. Lilith took her 
record at Santa Rosa in 1900. 



D. Bonham, Hanford. — There is no horse by the 
name of Saving G. that is credited by the Year Book 
with a record as fast as 2:30 trotting, or 2:25 pacing, 
and no horse of that name has started in any of the 
races reported in the Year Books since 1892. No 
horse by that name is the sire of any standard per- 
formers whatever, and no horse by that name is reg- 
istered. 



W. J. East, Rohnervillc. — The nearest available 
training track to Santa Cruz is the one at Salinas. The 
distance by rail between the two towns is about forty 
miles. The track at Salinas is a good one and is 
kept in good order all the time. Charles Whitehead, 
Salinas, Cal., is the superintendent of the track. 



C. W. Van Gelder, Acampo — We find no stallion 
registered as Robert Nibs. A pacer named Bob 
Knibbs took a record of 2:24% at Madison, South 
Dakota, in 1907, but he is given in the Year Book 
as a gelding. He was foaled in 1896, is by Tropic 
17514 (son of Sultan 1513), dam Fanny Cloverdale 
by Shadeland Onward. There is no mare called 
Brunswick Maid by Brunswick that is registered, but 
there is a Brunswick Maid registered in Vol. 17. She 
was foaled in 1901 and is by Little Delmar 42337, 
dam Brunswick Beauty by California Prince 9460, 
son of Gen. Benton. A stallion named Brunswick 
is registered. He was foaled in 1885 and was bv 
Walkill Prince 2797. 



C. B. W., Sacramento — Inex, by Sweepstakes, is the 
dam of the troters Our Jack 2:13%, Owynex 2:22% 
and Alamo 2:29%. 



F. N. F., Red Bluff — We have never seen the pac- 
ing filly Soumise, but have heard that she wears no 
hopples. 

o 

HALF ARABS FOR POLO PONIES. 



Professor Isaac P. Roberts, late dean of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture of Cornell University, has this to 
say of the part Arab horse in his book on "The 
Horse." 

"The best-tempered mustang or Indian mares would 
form most excellent foundation stock, on the dam's 
side, for the production of an American breed of 
polo ponies. If the Arab blood were once harmon- 
iously combined with the blood of the plains, a 
foundation, at least, would be laid of a breed of 
horses upon which an unexcelled breed of ponies 
suited for polo and other similar work could be 
reared. 

"The foundation stock for such a breed, though 
scattered, is abundant. Where is the genius who 
will take up the work of uniting the valuable, scat- 
tered, potential forces, and thus produce a breed 
likely to be much in demand in the near future? 
Now that good foundation stock is at hand for 
forming such a class of horses, it would be unfortu- 
nate if the breed were lost. Must wc be importing 
forever, or shall we be wise and produce animals 
worthy of being exported to the best, high-priced 
markets of Europe?" 

Apropos of this paragraph of Professor Roberts', 
it is interesting to note that there is now being es- 
tablished at El Rancho de las Rosas, near Alma which 
is three miles from Los Gatos in the Santa Clara 
Valley, a breeding plant of this very kind. Within 
a few years, the Rancho will be able to show a string 
of half mustang, half Arab horses. 

A half mustang yearling, sired by the Arab stal- 
lion, Obeyran I of the Alma string, took first prize 
at the New York State Fair two years ago in the 
yearling class. 

o 

DENVER DRIVING CLUB. 



Last year the Gentleman's Driving and Riding club 
of Denver gained a material increase in membership 
and treasury, says Field and Farm, notwithstanding 
that the club gave a greater number of matinees 
and entertainments than ever before. George II. 
Bstabrook was awarded the club cup for the f;is!rsl 
trotting heat in a race made by Country Jay. Judge 
A. E. Colburn took the cup for the fastest pacing 
heat in a race made by High Hall; J. Fred Roberts, 
the cup offered for the horse winning the greatest 
number of races, Monkey Mack turning the trick. 
Roberts also took the cup for the member making 
the greatest number of entries during the year and 
W. B. Huston for winning the greatest number of 
saddle events. The following officers were elected: 
J. A. Burnett, president; J. Fred Roberts, vice-pres- 
ident; J. K. Stuart, secretary-treasurer; J. M. Nor- 
man, historian; J. A. Osner, M. J. Dunleavy, C. H. 
Skeritt, E. A. Colburn, George H. Estabrook, C. L. 
Schlink, and F. C. Cainer, board of directors. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



1 Trotters and Pacers at Salinas I 



8 (By C. C. Crippen.) 8 

The farmers and stockmen of the Salinas valley 
are happy over the generous rainfall this part of 
the country received last week. They needed it 
badly and are praying for more with, at this writ- 
ing, a good prospect of getting it. 

The first man I met in the county seat of Monterey 
county was "Uncle Jim" Iverson, one of the oldest 
and most prominent residents of Salinas, having 
lived there over forty years. For a good many years 
Mr. Iverson has been quite extensively engaged in 
breeding and developing the light-harness horse and 
has produced a number of fast and noted race horses 
and stake winners. While he is still in the business, 
it is on a less extensive scale than formerly. But 
while the quantity of his trotting stock is not as 
great as in years past the quality is greatly improved. 
For a number of years he bred almost entirely to 
his own stallion Eugeneer 2:28, son of Electioneer 
and the great brood mare Lady Ellen (dam of seven 
in 2:30) by Carr*s Mambrino. This horse was pur- 
chased from Palo Alto Stock Farm when a colt at 
a time when Electioneer was establishing a repu- 
tation as the greatest sire of trotters. His blood 
lines appealed to the breeders about Salinas at that 
time as his dam. Lady Ellen 2:28, was one of the 
best of the get of the inbred Mambrino Chief horse 
known as Carr's Mambrino by Mambrino Patchen 
5S, dam by Mambrino Chief II, that Jesse D. Carr 
had brought from Kentucky. But Eugeneer was 
not a great success as a sire, yet he sired one good, 
game trotter in the handsome bay mare Princess 
2:13%, out of Belle by Kentucky Prince, dam of 
Prince Gift 2:12 by Good Gift, a half thoroughbred 
son of Electioneer that never got another trotter. 
To the credit of Eugeneer is also Tvaneer (3), 2:28, 
dam of North Star 2:1114, that was a high class three- 
year-old stake winner, having won all his engage- 
ments that year. It was a grand race the son of 
Nutwood Wilkes won that August day in 1905 at 
Santa Rosa when in his first start of the season he 
romped home in front of the best three-year-olds in 
California in 2:13%, 2:13% and 2:16. He looked like 
a 2:10 trotter to me that day, but of course I may 
have been mistaken, I know there were others that 
were, but the other way. 

Within the- last few years Mr. Iverson has been 
a liberal patron of many of the best sires in the 
State and has bred his best mares to Searchlight 
2:0314, Lecco 2:09%, Star Pointer 1:59%. Barondale 
2:11%. Del Coronado 2:09ft, Bonnie McK., Alconda 
Jay and others. Last Saturday Mr. Iverson took me 
in his buggy behind a new broodmare, or rather a 
mare that he recently purchased for a broodmare, 
and drove out to his ranch and then to the track 
to see the horses there. The mare we drove was 
Mamie Riley 2:16, by McKinney, dam a full sister 
to San Pedro 2:10% pacing and 2:14 trotting, by 
Del Sur 2:24. Mamie Riley comes of good broodmare 
blood and ought to make a good producer. A colt 
by Bon Voyage out of her would be bred about 
right. At the farm I saw North Star 2:11%, the 
leviathan trotter, almost seventeen hands high. This 
great trotter went a little wrong last year, has been 
fired and blistered and will get a year's rest and then 
be prepared for the campaign of 1910. In the next 
stall was that big and fast trotter Prince Gift 2:12, 
now being used for a road horse. Here is a horse 
that is sound and all right in every respect and has 
all his old time speed; can step an eighth better than 
fifteen seconds any time, is perfectly level headed 
and would make a great speedway and matinee trot- 
ter. 

Among those in the field near the barns was a 
three-year-old full sister to North Star and a year- 
ling, full brother to that great horse named and 
registered as Polar Star, a fine looking black year- 
ling filly by Alconda Jay. dam Amy I by Diablo 2:09%, 
next dam by Anteeo 2:16% and a yearling colt by 
Star Pointer, dam Dictator Belle by Dictatus 2:17. In 
a paddock was a handsome black three-year-old colt 
named Lecora, by Lecco 2:09%, out of of the Diablo 
mare Amy I. This colt Is a trotter and like all the 
Leccos that have had any training, a very promis- 
ing one. 



In Charley Whitehead's stable at the track Mr. 
Iverson has a very handsome chestnut two-year-old 
full sister to North Star that is a likely prospect. She 
has been named Salinas Girl. Also a fine looking 
brown colt by Del Coronado 2:09%, dam Mambrita 
by Carr's Mambrino and a very beautiful bay two- 
year-old filly by Bonnie McK., out of Amy I by 
Diablo. 

Mr. Whitehead has his good black pacing son of 
Diiectoi- L':1T lih.li •_■ as ynod as ever in his life. Del- 
phi 2:12% is about the only record son of the great 
old race horse and sire of race horses left in Cal- 
ifornia. I saw a number of his get — two that looked 
particularly good — a three-year-old brown filly out 
of Nina B. by Electioneer and a four-year-old black 
filly, dam the fast pacing mare. The Mrs., by Derby 
Ash. A good looking bay mare by Alex Malone out 
of Angie Wilkes by Guy Wilkes, is a good trotting 
prospect. Mr. Whitehead has had her but two months 
and she has come from nothing to a mile in 2:28%, 
and they say she is an extra good gaited trotter. 
She is owned by E. S. Train, owner of the great 
Ray o' Light (3) 2:08%. Mr. Train bought her on 
account of her breeding, her sire being a full brother 



to Carrie B. 2:18, dam of Ray o Light and as her 
dam is by Guy Wilkes, she has a right to be a good 
one. Another good loking young trotter is a black 
three-year-old colt by Greco B., dam Lizzie S. 2:28 
by Aritevolo 2:19%, owned by Al. Pryor of Ben Lo- 
mond, Cal. A yearling by Oro Guy, son of Oro 
Wilkes, dam Nina B. by Electioneer, showed more 
trot in the paddock than I have seen any colt 
show in a long time. It is my opinion that this 
colt is a coming crackerjack and I hope that in 
him Charlie Whitehead has another stake winner 
as good as any that he has ever had, for this colt 
is his own property. 

Shot (3) 2:29% is a nice looking chestnut geld- 
ing by Robin, sire of Robizola 2:12%, dam by 
Brown Jug, son of Nutwood 600, that Mr. Whitehead 
thinks is an extra good prospect. He gave him his 
record with a couple of months' work when a three- 
year-old and he has had no training since. Charlie 
recently became his owner and will get him ready 
for the races. 

The fast trotter and stake winner, Delia Derby 
2:11%, is looking very strong and robust. In 1907 
and in the first races of last year, this daughter of 
('has. Derby was a sad disappointment to her 
owner, J. N. Anderson, and also her trainer. She had 
speed to burn but would persist in jumping up and 
sometimes getting the flag when she ought to be 
getting the money. Finally a pair of knee boots 
were put on her and she began to act better with 
the result that Mr. Whitehead decided to take her 
through the Northern Circuit along with the pacing 
colt Ray o' Light. She justified his decision by re- 
turning home with over $1,100 to her credit. He 
will race her this coming sceason and believes she 
will be a prominent factor in her classes. 



W. H. Williams has only five head at the track at 
the present time, but more coming soon. They are 
a black gelding by Del Norte 2:08. A mare by 
Monterey 2:09%, dam by Tempest, sire of Iago 2:11, 
that he has had only since December 1st. She has 
already been a half in 1:10 on a trot and is a very 
promising green mare. A two-year-old colt by Henry 
Nutwood 2:29, dam Sultana by Altoona, is a big, 
rangy colt and a trotter. He could step a 2:40 gait 
as a yearling with his first set of shoes on. His 
sire ought to get trotters with half a chance as he 
was a slashing gaited trotter himself with lots of 
natural speed and a perfectly balanced head. He 
is by Henry Patchen, son of Geo. M. Patchen, Jr., 
and out of the dam of Ethel Downs 2:10, by Nut- 
wood 600. Had he been given more age before his 
training began I believe he would have trotted faster 
than his famous half sister. He was a large and 
growthy colt and his legs would not stand the work. 

But the pride of Mr. William's small bunch is a 
four-year-old chestnut filly, bred at Aptos Stock 
Farm and owned by S. H. Cowell of Santa Cruz. This 
filly was sired by Prince Henry, son of Dexter 
Prince, out of the great old race mare Hulda 2:08% by 
Guy Wilkes. Mr. Williams did not get this filly 
until the 15th of last September. At first she did 
not act much like a trotter, being fussy and fidgety, 
and would dance and prance and do most everything 
but trot. Finally one day she struck a trot, and 
from that day Mr. Williams' troubles were over. 
She has done nothing but trot ever since and has 
made speed wonderfully fast and recently stepped 
a full mile in 2:20%, last half in 1:07 with ease 
and her trainer thinks that 2:15 would not be be- 
yond her capacity right now. To look at her she is 
all that the most critical could desire, a beautifully 
formed filly with lots of finish and the finest qua! • 
ity of limbs and feet, stands about 15.2, and has 
a disposition to be unfriendly with strangers. 

The great mare Hulda has been unfortunate in 
her foals, one daughter of hers by Dexter Prince, 
which Charley Dean bought and took East, was a 
very fast trotter, but died nearly two years ago. It 
is to be hoped that this one will live to perpetuate 
the greatness of the old mare, as she seems to have 
the qualities necessary provided she meets with no 
misfortune. 



J. N. Anderson has the dam of Delia Derby 2:11% 
at his place in town, she is a good looking brood- 
mare and heavy in foal to Highland C. 2:19%. Nora 
D. 2:22 was by Del Sur 2:24, out of Juana by Crich- 
at his place in town: she is a good looking brood- 
mare line. She has a yearling colt by Bon Voyage 
that is a big, black, handsome fellow and looks 
like a trotter. 

I saw a pair of choicely bred yearlings in a large 
vacant lot that their owners have reason to be 
very proud of. One was a large and very smoothly 
turned bay filly out of Miss Sidney Dillon by Sidney 
Dillon. If this one don't trot early and fast it will 
be because it will not have a chance. She is owned 
by A. J. Zavalo. Ivar Cornett owns the other. It 
is bred to pace and can do nothing else, is by Star 
Pointer out of Dictata by Dictatus, a 2:10 sire of 
pacers. Every move and action of this colt is like 
his famous sire. 



Robert Garside owns a likely young stallion by 
the game old Boodle 2:12%, dam by Nutwood Wilkes, 
second dam by Altoona 8850, third dam by Junio 
2:22, sire of Athanio 2:10, fourth dam by Carr's 
Mambrino. He has also two mares by McKinney out 
of the same dam and one of these mares is in foal 
to Alconda Jay. 



W. Parsons, owner of the champion race trotter of 
the Pacific Coast, Berta Mc. 2:08, owns her full 
brother, one year younger, Albert Mc. This is a 
handsome young horse that in conformation and style 



is hard to beat. He also owns a two-year-old chest- 
nut colt by Zolock that is a good looker and showed 
me a two-year-old filly and a yearling colt by Al- 
bert Mc. out of a Diablo mare, that are a credit to 
that young sire. 

Alberta 2:25 by Altoona 8850, dam of Berta Mc, 
is a good looking big, black' mare, heavy in foal to 
the mighty Zombro. Since raising Berta Mc. and 
her brother, Albert Mc, Mr. Parsons disposed of 
their dam Alberta. Last fall she and her yearling 
son were to be sold at a forced sale and the horse- 
men of Salinas supposed Mr. Parsons was there to 
protect the owner and consequently did not bid 
against Mr. Parsons when the old mare and her 
Zolock colt were put up for sale, the result was 
that the owner of Berta Mc. bought her dam in foal 
to Zombro for the insignificent sum of $90, and the 
colt for $160. What do you think of that for luck? 

.1. D. Kalar, ex-county clerk of Monterey county, 
always has some good young thing to amuse him- 
self with. Three years ago he bought from the es- 
tate of Jesse D. Carr a yearling filly by Searchlight 
2:03%, dam Lildine by Boodle 2:12% and broke and 
trained her for his own amusement and recreation. 
Mr. Kalar handled the filly carefully and did not get 
in a hurry, with the result that she not only devel- 
oped speed, but good manners and became a nice 
pacer. He sold her last spring to W. T. McBride, 
who has her now at Pleasanton where she worked 
a mile last summer in 2:12, as a four-year-old. Mr. 
Kalar now owns another promising three-year-old 
pacing filly by Delphi 2:12%, dam by Chas. Derby, 
that gives him a great deal of pleasure. 



This is Monday morning January 11th and I am 
waiting here at Salinas to see Mr. E. S. Train and 
his great pacing colt, Ray o' Light. Mr. Train sent 
word to Chas. Whitehead that he would leave Santa 
Cruz yesterday morning with the colt for Salinas 
and would be here last night, but they did not ar- 
rive. As the roads are not in the best of condi- 
tion owing to the rains, and as it is forty miles from 
the city by the sea to Salinas it is probable that Mr. 
Train decided not to do the entire distance in one 
day and stopped over at Watsonville. We expect 
them by noon, and I shall wait to see the great 
racing colt that is responsible to me for his existence. 
That's a fact. Ask Ray Mead, his breeder, if the 
"knockers" didn't do their best when they got a 
chance at him to discourage him from breeding Car- 
rie B. to the "King of race horses." 

I met Mr. Mead that Sunday morning in March, 
1904, when he came to Pleasanton for the purpose 
of selecting a sire to mate with his mare. When I 
found that it was the daughter of Alex Button and 
Carrie Malone, sister to Chas. Derby and the cham- 
pion Klatawah 2:05%, that he wanted to breed, I 
made up my mind that she should be bred to Search- 
light and none other. He got away from me once or 
twice during the day and the "knockers" grabbed 
him and started to get in their work. But I res- 
cued him in time, and when I went with him to the 
train that evening he promised to send Carrie B. 
to Searchlight and before the week was over she 
was there. Mr. Mead afterward told me about his 
experience with the "knockers" and that on account 
of all he heard from them came very near not 
breeding his mare to the mighty son of Dark Night 
against whom there is now not a word of slander 
uttered. Not since Aerolite appeared as a two-year- 
old and in his only start got the two-year-old pac- 
ing record of the year and other colts by him be- 
gan to show their quality has there been any knocks 
aimed in the direction of the sire of Aerolite and 
Ray o' Light, two champions that will surely win 
more championship honors. The Limit is in the same 
class, to say nothing of many other great ones that 
are sure to follow. 



The Salinas track is a surprise to me. I never 
had an idea that it was a good winter track. But 
it surely is, and I now wonder that there are not 
more horses wintering here. It rained hard last 
Thursday night and nearly all day Friday and 
Friday night. By Saturday afternoon the track 
was in condition to harrow and jog on. The 
stables are high and dry, the drainage good, there is 
less mud than around any other track I know of 
when it rains. The roads in the vicinity are excellent 
to jog on in wet weather. Hay, feed and straw is 
generally cheaper here than in other parts of the 
State. More stake winners have been developed on 
this track within the last three or four years than 
any other track in California, which fact proves that 
conditions here must be favorable. 



C. Z. Hebert is still in the breeding business but 
not as extensively as in years past. He still owns 
the good trotting stallion Bruno 2:16% and several 
record mares out of his mare Dolly, (dam of five), by 
Mozart. He also owns the daughter of Bruno, Mag- 
gie B. 2:23%, and two grand daughters of Dolly's 
in Louisa A 2:13% by Hambletonian Wilkes and 
Elaine 2:22% by Robin. Louisa A. and Alice 2:18%, 
also by Hambletonian Wilkes and out of Dolly were 
bred last year to Ray o' Light. Altoonita 2:19%, an- 
other daughter of Dolly, is already a double producer 
and in the little band of record mares, descendants 
of that great broodmare, Mr. Herbert has really a 
choice collection of young matrons of his own breed- 
ing. 



Well, I saw Ray o' Light and he is all my fancy 
painted him. 

Not as large as most of the get of his sire, but 
what he lacks in size he makes up in quality and 
finish. His limbs are perfect and show no bad ef- 
fects from the many fast miles he raced last sum- 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



mer over all kinds of tracks. When 1 read in the 
daily papers last fall the report of his winning the 
three-year-old pace at Portland in which he obtained 
his record of 2:08%, the other two heats being right 
close to the same notch, I was astounded, for only 
the day before he made the winner of a class race 
for aged horses step in 2:07%, 2:07*4 and 2:08%. 
Mr. Whitehead tells me that in the first heat of that 
race he did not carry his watch and had no idea 
the mile was better than 2:11 or 2:12 until the 
time 2:07 was hung out, and that the colt paced the 
other heats with the same ease. He's a wonder, 
that's all. 

o ■ 

A HANDSOME GREEN PACER. 



Edtor Breeder and Sportsman — Enclosed find a 
picture of Princess Ethel, two-year-old filly, (pacer), 
sire Prince Charles by Charles Derby, dam Ethel C. 
2:20 by Sidney, bred by Frank Cummings, now owned 
by R. S. Wood of Los Banos. 

This filly was taken from the pasture the 15th 
of last July, lame with a sprained shoulder. I doc- 
tored her six weeks and during that time had har- 
ness on her eight times. She was hardly bridle wise 
at this time, but I began to try her out, and like 
most of the Sidneys she had lots of snap and fire. 
One blow with the whip would have ruined her. 
She was fat and strong and after the soreness dis- 
appeared I began to move her up. At the first she 
could step a 2:40 clip with the ease of a 2:10 pacer, 
and before she was trained thirty days she stepped 
a half in 1:21. 

Six weeks from the beginning of her work, she 
had a prompter alongside for the first time and 
she showed the Sidney in her by running away, pac- 
ing, the half in 1:10. 

I have always expected to see a 2:00 pacer in 
the Sidney family but I never thought this mare 
had a chance until she jumped from 1:21 to 1:10 in 
one bound. After this performance she was rested 
for a week and then driven a quarter in :30%. This 
was her fourth workout. In the fifth she worked 
a half in 1:07%, going the last quarter in :32%. 
Her sixth workout was a half in 1:04, last quarter 
in :30. The last tryout was full miles and her fastest 
mile previous to the last work was 2:34. I had 
always heard the Sidneys were faint-hearted for a 
distance and was superstitious about her going much 
of a mile with such short preparation. She failed 
to show the white feather. Gave her two full miles 
to test her gameness; a warming up mile in 2:34, 
which equaled her best mile prior to that time. 
With a twenty minute rest, she paced the second 
mile in 2:21% and seemed no more distressed than 
had she gone a mile in 2:40. With another twenty 
minute rest she paced the third mile in 2:17 and 
fairly ran away, the last quarter in :31. How well 
she could have gone the mile with a pacemaker and 
under a drive, I can only guess, as I have never 
called upon her. 

She is one of the kindest horses I have ever known 
and in all her work has never broken but once 
and then immediately ran into a 2:10 pace. It is a 
sure thing she could have beaten 2:10 in last No- 
vember. 

In color, she is a deep red sorrel, 16 hands high, 
light rhane and tail, and the most powerfully built 
two-year-old harness bred filly I have ever seen. 
Weight 1,100 pounds. In many ways she resembles 
Aerolight. Big, strong filly with finish and substance 

Very unfortunately she is in no stakes and Mr. 
Wood is yet undecided whether or not he will race 
her next year, but would like to take a shot at the 
three-year-old record. 

She is absolutely sound and without blemish, and 
several tempting offers in four figures have been 
turned down by her owner. 

In regard to the track here, it was built by Miller 
& Lux eighteen years ago; laid out by civil en- 
gineers and is one of the truest and fastest tracks 
I ever trained on. If it were within twenty miles of 
San Francisco it would be better than a gold mine. 
I have been here six months and seen it under all 
conditions. It is a very fast summer track, with 
water within eighteen inches of the top of the track. 
Never needs water and beats the Pleasanton track 
to dry out. It is dressed down about four feet from 
the top soil and is a mixture of clay and sand and 
enough adobe to hold it together. 

Anyone looking for a good track, cheap feed and 
little expense to train their horses, can do no better 
than come to Los Banos and train over the Billiard 
Table track of the great San Joaquin Valley. 

WM. BROWN, 
Los Banos, Cal. 
Life-long trainer, commonly called Smoke-Stack 

Brown. . 

Charles F. Morel has succeeded to the well known 
and old established harness and leather goods bus- 
iness of J. O'Kane & Co., with which he has been 
so closely connected as manager for upwards of the 
past nine years. He has removed the business to 
the Sheldon Building, 457 Market street, where he 
has fitted up in most modern and up-to-date fashion, 
the large and commodious store having its principal 
frontage at the Market street entrance of the build- 
ing. Mr. Morel carries a full line of the highest 
grades of fine harness and leather goods, suit cases, 
leather bags and leather novelties, robes, whips and 
turf goods of every description. He makes a feature 
of the manufacture of horse boots and racing special- 
ties. For prices which are right and moderate, com- 
patible with the very finest of manufactured goods, 
Mr. Morel challenges competition in sustaining the 
reputaton earned for so many years by the J. O'Kane 
Company. Intending purchasers should call and in- 
spect his new store. 



PACIFIC BREEDERS FUTURITY, NO. 6. 



Sixth Payment of $10 Made on 56 Three-Year-Olds 
on January 2d. 



There are fifty-six of the original entries in Pacific 
Breeders Futurity No. 6, which is for foals of 1906, 
whose owners considered them promising enough 
to make payment on this month, and from these 
will be selected the starters in the two three-year- 
old events at the Breeders meeting next summer. 
As owners do not have to designate the gait of 
these youngsters until making starting payments 
ten days before the meeting it is not possible for 
us to announce at this time which of them are trot- 
ters or which pacers. Those that started in the two- 
year-old events of 1908 will, however, perform at 
the same gait in all probability, and it will be of 
interest to all who have made this sixth payment 
to re-print at this time the summaries of the two- 
year-old division of the stake as trotted and paced 
at Chico last year. 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity, two-year-old trotters, 
$1,450: 

Prince Lock, ch. c. by Zolock-Naulahka by 

Nutford (Pounder) 2 1 1 

Ella M. R., b. m. by Lord Alwin-Excella by 

Monbells (Twohig) 1 2 3 

All Style, br. c. by Stam B., Zaza by Bay Bird 

(Quinn) 3 3 2 

Easter, b. c. by Monicrat-Alta Reina by Atto 

Rex (Rutherford) 4 4 4 

Eddie G., b. c. by Tom Smith-Kate Lumry by 

Shadeland Onward (Zibbell) 5 5 5 

Time— First heat, 35% 1:11, 1:44, 2:16%, 
Second heat, 34%, 1:08, 1:42, 2:21. 
Third heat, 35%, 1:11, 1:44%, 2:18. 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity, two-vear-old pacers, 
$750: 

Easter D., b. f. by Diablo-Donnagene by Athadon 

(Stewart) 1 1 

Teddy Bear, b. c. by Del Coronado, dam Queen S. 

by Sable Wilkes (Ivey) 4 2 

Jim Logan, I), c. by Chas. Derby-Effie Logan by 

Durfee (Montgomery) 2 4 

Godollo, br. c. by Zombro-Silver Bells by Silver 

Bow (Mitchell) 3 3 

Time— First heat, 34%, 1:09, 1:43%, 2:15%. 
Second heat, 32%, 1:05%, T.39%, 2:13%. 

Prince Lock, the winner of the trotting division, 
is dead. All the others that started in either di- 
vision have had sixth payment made on them how- 
ever. The fifty-six colts and fillies from which the 
money winners of the three-year-old stakes will come 
this year are the following: 

Thos. H. Brent's ch. f. Edgarelia by Edgar Boy, 
dam Laurelia by Caution; ch. c. Vincomar by 
Caution, dam Saffrona by Antelope. 

1. L. Borden's bl. g. by Prince Robert, dam Allie 
Cresco by Cresco. 

W. O. Bowers' ch. g. Zack by Silver Bee, dam 
Sadie Benton by Tom Benton. 

Jacob Brolliar's br. f. Zonelita by Zolock, dam 
Stonelita by Stoneway. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's b. c. Just Mc by Nearest 
McKinney, dam Just It by Nearest. 

Alex. Brown's br. f. Curlew by Nushagak, dam 
Nutflower by Niuwood Wilkes; gr. f. Ansella by 
Prince Ansel, dam Serpola by Mendocino. 

E. K. Brown's s. f. Maymonio by Demonio, dam 
May Norris by Norris. 

Mrs. L. G. Bonfilio's b. c. Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam by Patron. 

Estate of Martin Carter's b. f. Ella M. R. by Lord 
Alwin, dam Excella by Monbells. 

C. A. Canfield's b.c. Volante by Zombro, dam Mamie 
Elizabeth by Red Regent. 

W. G. Durfee's br. f. Zulu Belle by Petigru, dam 
Johanna Treat by Thos. Rysdyk. 

Geo. H. Fox's b. c. by Cresceus, dam Silpan by 
Silver Bow. 

R. H. Fleming's b. f. Miss Wayman by Highland 
C, dam Patty D. by Ultimus. 

E. A. Gammon's bl. f. Nita H. by Zolock, dam Lily 
S. by Direct. 

T. B. Gibson's b. f. Virginia Lee by Iran Alto, dam 
Maggie by Soudan. 

E. Griffin's b. c. Lovelock by Zolock, dam Etta 
Wilkes by Billy Sayers. 

W. H. Hoy's s. f. Complete by Halite, clam Camilla 
by Bayswater Wilkes. 

Wm. Hendrickson's b. f. by McKena, dam Ohio 
by Peveril; b. f. by McKena, dam Maud bv G rover 
Clay. 

Henry Halm's ch. c. Locket by Lecco, dam Hen- 
rietta by Boodle. 

W. B. Humfreville's br. c. by Kinney Lou, clam 
Nellie by Jim Mulvenna. 

E. P. Heald's b. f. by Tom Smith, dam Lady Mar- 
vin by Don Marvin ; b. f. by Tom Smith, clam 
Alice McKinney by McKinney. 

C. L. Hollis' s. c. Stam Hopkins by Stamboulet, 
dam Sis Hopkins by Strath way. 

Dr. A. C. Humelbaugll'S b. m. Zoe h. by Zombro, 
dam Leah by Secretary. 

J. I!. Iverson's b. c. Corono by Del Coronado, dam 
Mambrita by Carr's Mambrino. 

Joost Bros.' bl. c. Bon way by Bonnie Direct, dam 
Presumption by Steinway. 

Fred Jasper's br. c. by Wayland W., clam Nellie 
J. by St. Patrick. 

J. I). Kalar's s. f. Clara J. by Delphi, clam Dupli- 
cate by Chas. Derby. 

F. W. Kimble's gr. f. Leola Lou by Kinney Lou, 
dam Princess Leola by Leonel. 

F. J. Krlpatrick's ch. g. Four Stockings by Kinney 
Lou, clam Eloctress Wilkes by Nutwood Wilkes. 
Estate of L. H. Mcintosh's b. f. by Arner, dam 



Kitty by Arthur Wilkes. 

Geo. H. McCanu's b. f. Palo Maid by Palo King, dam 
Grace McK. by McKinney. 

William Morgan's bl. c. Tracy by Direcho, dam 
Grace McK. by McKinney. 

Macedo & Costa's b. f. Azalea by Hamb. Wilkes, 
dam Ida May by Grosvenor. 

J. Elmo Montgomery's b. c. Jim Logan by Chas. 
Derby, dam Effie Logan by Durfee. 

Chris. G. Owen's br. f. Lou McKinney by Kinney 
Lou, dam Nancy O. by Clay S. 

Dana Perkins br. c. All Style by Stam B., dam 
Zaya by Bay Bird . 

Jasper Paulsen's br. f. Palo Alto Girl by McKena, 
dam Helen Caroline by Campaign. 

A. G. Pryor's br. c. Cassie G. by Greco B., dam 
Lizzie S. by Antevolo. 

E. A. Swaby's b. f. Grace S. by Nushagak, dam 
Antie by Antevolo. 

Chas. F. Silva's ch. c. Natoma by Zolock, dam 
Polka Dot by Mendocino br. f. Camellia by Si am 
B., dam Swift Bird by Waldstein; b. c. Teddy Bear 
by Del Coronado, dam Queen S. by Sable Wilkes. 

Thos. Smith's bl. c. Vallejo King by Gen'l. J. 
B. Frisbie, dam Reinette by Dexter Prince. 

Henry Smith's s. c. Honey Boy by Demonio, dam 
Sister by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Jas. Stewart's b. f. Easter D. by Diablo, dam Don- 
nagene by Athadon. 

John Suglian's b. c. King Kohlan by Kohlan King, 
dam Clytie by Magister. 

L. H. Todhunter's br. c. Godollo by Zombro, dam 
The Silver Bell by Silver Bow; foal by Zombro, dam 
Loma B. by Stam B. 

Chas. Whitehead's b. f. Snixie by Delphi, dam Nina 
B. by Electioneer. 

C. H. Williams' br. f. Nalta W. by Unimak, dam 
Alta Nola by Altamont. 

S. B. Wright's b. c. Easter by Monocrat, dam Alta 
Reina by Atto Rex. 

J. W. Zibbell's b. c. Eddie G. by Tom Smith, dam 
Kate Lumry by Shadeland Onward. 

o 

TWO HIGH-CLASS MARES. 



In buying broodmares always look lor i hose whose 
pedigrees run in producing lines. Capt. C. H. Wil- 
liams, of Palo Alto, California, offers for sale in this 
issue two mares bred this way that should be snap- 
ped up eagerly by breeders who are in the markel 
for broodmares. The first is the peculiarly named 
mare, Twenty-third by Director, dam Nettie Nut- 
wood by Nutwood, and so on. This mare is the dam 
of that wonderfully fast trotter Sterling McKinney 
2:06%, sold last year for $35,000 and said to be 
beyond question the very fastest trotter in America. 
Sterling McKinney is an own brother to Capt. Wil- 
liams' young stallion Unimak, a very fast horse whose 
first colts are just coming three years old and show- 
ing very fast. Captain Williams owns a small 
farm at Palo Alto, and finds that it is overstocked, so 
has decided to sell a few. Twenty-third is now in foal 
to Henry Helman's Jay Bird colt, Alconda Jay, and 
the prospective foal should be worth more when it is 
weaned than Captain Williams asks for the mare. 
There are very few mares in the United States that 
have produced a 2:06% or better trotter — less than 
sixty all told out of some fifty or sixty thousand that 
are registered. Twenty-third was foaled in 1891, and 
is now fat and in fine shape, looking to be good 
for half a dozen or more foals yet. Her blood lines 
cannot be excelled as she is by Director 2:17, one 
of the greatest sires this country has produced, 
while her clam is by Nutwood, the greatest of all 
broodmare sires, her second dam by Vick's Ethan 
Allen, and her third dam by Williamson's Belmont, 
all of which breeding is so recorded in the American 
Trotting Register. 

The other mare Captain Wililams offers for sale 
is Alta Nola, standard registered, by the great Alta- 
mont, sire of seven in 2:10 and the dams of three, 
dam the producing mare Nola, dam of Phoenix 2: L6%, 
by Nutwood, second dam a producing mare by Bow- 
man's Clark Chief, etc. Alto Nola has a record of 
2:20 pacing, has worked a mile in 2:12% and a quar- 
ter in 30% seconds, and her three-year-old by Uni- 
mak is a fast trotter and entered in the Breeders 
Futurity this year. Captain Williams owns fillies 
from both these mares that he will retain for breed- 
ing purposes. The prices he asks for Twenty-third 
and Alta Nola are low and they are actually worth 
more than is asked for them. 

o 

GRAND STAND BLOWN DOWN AT OROVILLE. 



Secretary F. E. Emlay, of the Orovllle Speedway 
Association writes us that on the afternoon of Jan- 
uary 8th a gale of wind swept over the new half 
mile track there demolishing the grand stand, which 
completely collapsed under the tremendous pressure; 
of the wind. This is a severe loss to the association, 
but with commendable enterprise the stand will be 
re-built right away. The old stand would seat 900 
persons but the new one will have nearly double 
that capacity. 

Mr. Emlay is taking steps to have his handsome 
stallion Washington McKinney registered. This 
horse is by Washington McKinney. dam Hazel Turk; 
dam of Fabia McKinney 2:17%, by Silas Skinner 
2:17, second dam Miss Brown, dam of three in the 
list, by Volunteer 1758. third dam Maggie Dale by 
Owen Dale, son of Williamson's Belmont, fourth 
dam Juliet, a running bred mare whose breeding Is 
not given. Washington McKinney, Jr., is eligible; 
to registration under rule 1, his sire and dam both 
being registered. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



NOTES AND NEWS 



The Portland horse and cattle sale will be held this 
year from April 26th to May 1st. 



Don't forget to nominate your mare in the State 
Futurity Stake No. 1, $5,000. Entries close with 
Secretary Filcher, February 1st. 



Louise Volland, a two-year-old filly by John R. Gen- 
try 2:00%, that took a two-year-old pacing record of 
2:18% last summer, afterwards paced a half in 1:03. 



The outlook is good for racing down the Great 
Western Circuit, the coining season. There will be 
racing from Peoria, 111., to El Paso, Tex., every week 
from July 5 to November 5. 



The National Horse Show Association, of New- 
York, will go out of existence, and according to 
the New York Herald, has a surplus of $250,000 to 
divide amongst its stockholders. 



Dick McMahan, the leading driver of 1908, whose 
horses won $41,970 during the year, is on his way 
to California, and is doubtless on the lookout for 
a few real good ones to race next summer. 



California has donned her carpet of green, and 
the general rain of this week assures good feed for 
stock and plenty of it. It looks like prosperity for 
the entire Pacific Coast for the season of 1909. 



Cresceus 2:02%, the fastest trotting stallion ever 
bred in America, was sold and sent to Russia some 
time ago, and now his fastest son, Crescent Route 
2:08% has also been sold to European parties. 



It is said that Lou Dillon 1:58% will be mated 
with either Bingen 2:06% or Peter the Great 2:07% 
the coming spring. She has two foals by John A. 
McKerron 2:04% and is in foal to him at the pres- 
ent time. 



Sidney Dillon is sire of the four fastest trotters 
ever sired by one horse. They are Lou Dillon 1:58%, 
Ruth Dillon (4) 2:06%, Dolly Dillon 2:06%, to 
wagon and Stanley Dillon 2:07%, winner of the 
M. and M. 



Ted Hayes has closed a contract with the owners 
of the phenomenal pacer Velox 2:09% and will 
campaign the son of Zolock 2:05% through the 
Grand Circuit this year. Velox will be trained at 
Pleasanton. 



Mr. C. M. Dee, of Ogden, Utah, has recently pur- 
chased the registered pacing stallion Remember 
25405, record 2:15% by Mambrino Boy 844, dam Re- 
membrance, great brood mare, by Geo. Wilkes. Re- 
member is the sire of several fast performers. 



A handicap with the slowest horse to have a mark 
of 2:09, is being talked about for the Grand Circuit 
meeting at Detroit next summer. If the race is given 
it will take the place of the usual free-for-all trot. 
Twenty-five thousand dollars has been suggested as 
the amount of the purse. 



Mr. S. K. Trefry, the veteran horseman, who 
owns that fast trotting stallion, Kenneth C. 2:13% 
by McKinney, is confined to his house in Pleasanton 
by sickness. Chas. DeRyder has the stallion and 
will probably race him on the circuit this year after 
the horse makes a season in the stud. 



W. T. McBride, who purchased the stallion Vo- 
lante by Neernut at the Pleasanton sale last spring, 
has re-sold the horse to J. F. Bennett, of Reno, Ne- 
vada, and also sold to the same party the three-year- 
old Diablo Mac by Diablo, dam by McKinney. It is 
Mr. Bennett's intention to train and race both these 
young stallions. 



Government buyers have recently secured 400 
mules in and around Stockton, Cal. Henry Higgin- 
botham, A. F. Rooker and P. J. Chalmers furnishing 
nearly all of them. Prices paid by the government 
officials were from $200 to $250 each. The four 
hundred mules were subjected to the mallein test 
and but three of the animals were rejected. 



Patchen 'Wilkes Farm, Lexington, Ky., send us an 
elaborately tabulated pedigree of Chrystallion 2:14, 
one of the farms sires. It is carried out to the 
seventh remove and printed in two colors, making 
a most attractive sheet and an expensive one. Chrys 
tallion is by Arion 2:07%, dam Chrystalline (2) 
2:19% by Onward. Among the stallions at Patchen 
Wilkes Farm are Peter the Great 2:07%, Patchen 
Wilkes 2:29%, Axtellion 2:15%, J. J. Audubon 2:19, 
Mighty Onward 2:22% and Onfield, trial 2:05. 



Mr. T. D. Sexton, of Oakland, advertises for sale 
this week a bay pacing gelding by Sidney Dillon, out 
of a Director mare, and a broodmare by Antevolo, 
out of a mare by the old champion runner Thad 
Stevens, second dam a mare by Whipples Hamble- 
tonian, sire of the dam of Azote 2:04%. The pacing 
gelding has a world of speed and has shown a 
quarter in 29 seconds. The broodmare is in foal to 
Chestnut Tom 2:15, son of Nutwood Wilkes, and 
is nominated in the Breeders Futurity. 



Dan E. Hoffman of the Columbia Stables has re- 
cently purchased a four-year-old gelding by Dictatus 
2:17 that he has named Dictatum. While entirely 
green, after a couple of work-outs Dictatum paced 
a mile in 2:30 over the Stadium track, the last 
half in 1:12 and the last quarter in 33 seconds. 



Dr. F. J. Crease, of Bakersfield, may lose a val- 
uable two-year-old filly by Richmond Chief 2:11% 
which some person accidentally or otherwise shot in 
the chest while the filly was in pasture. When dis- 
covered she was very weak from loss of blood, but 
may be saved unless blood poisoning results. The 
Doctor would give considerable to know who the 
careless hunter was that shot the filly. 



Dave Moshier, the Porterville horseman, is try- 
ing to arrange a stake for local two-year-old pacers 
to come off at the county fair to be held in Tulare 
county next fall. He proposes that a stake be ar- 
ranged with $100 entrance fee to be paid in install- 
ments and believes there are eight or ten two-year- 
olds there that would enter. It is to be hoped Mr. 
Moshier succeeds in getting this stake to fill. 



At the annual meeting of the San Francisco Driv- 
ing Club held last week the following officers were 
elected: President, W. J. Kenney; vice-president, 
Bert Edwards; secretary, Geo. Erlin; treasurer, F. P. 
Lauterwasser; sergeant-at-arms, H. Schottler. The 
club is in a most prosperous condition and is ar- 
ranging for matinees early in the year, the first of 
which will be on the Stadium track in Golden Gate 
Park. 



Mr. D. L. Bachant, President of the Fresno City 
Driving club, and owner of that fast and game trot- 
ting stallion Athasham 2:09%, recently purchased 
the standard and registered mare, Corinne Neilson 
by Clarence Wilkes, dam Flossie by Prompter, sire 
dam of Gratt 2:02%. Corinne Neilson is the dam of 
Perfection, the mare that Mr. Geo. Estabrook of 
Denver, paid $10,000 for after seeing her work a mile 
at the trot in 2:06%. Mr. Bachant will breed Cor- 
inne Neilson to Athasham this spring and the nick 
should be a good one. There is producing blood all 
through the pedigrees of both Athasham and Cor- 
inne Neilson, the fourth dam of the mare being by 
John Bull, whose great grandson, the famous pacer 
Johnston 2:06%, held the world's pacing record way 
back in 1884. Breeders await with much interest the 
result of mating Perfection's dam with Athasham 
2:09% and it is pretty safe to predict that a good 
gaited, game and fast trotter will come from this 
union. 



Among the royally bred stallions now in Charles 
DeRyder's stables at Pleasanton that will be in 
service in California this year is the bay horse 
Sir Boreal 2:25%, a son of Boreal 2:15%, he by 
Bow Bells out of Rosy Morn, the great brood mare 
by Alcantara. As Bow Bells was by Electioneer 
out of Beautiful Bells, the blood lines of Sir Bor- 
eal on his sire's side are certainly very high class. 
His dam's breeding is just as good, however, as she 
is a producing mare by the great Baron Wilkes 
2:18, second dam by Strathmore, third by Alta 765, 
producing son of American Clay 14, fourth by High- 
land Chief, son of Mambrino Chief 11, fifth by Hal- 
corn, sixth by Highlander and seventh by Gen. 
Taylor, not the California horse of that name, how- 
ever. Sir Boreal is Electioneer in the male line, just 
the horse for California's numerous high class Wilkes 
mares. Mr. DeRyder will have five stallions in all 
standing for public service this year, the others 
being the old champion pacer Star Pointer 1:59%, 
whose 2:00% in a race has never been beaten, the 
whirlwind pacer Sherlock Holmes 2:06 by Zolock 
2:05%, the McKinney trotter, Kenneth C. 2:13%, 
whose dam has four in the list, and the handsome 
and stylish, unmarked trotter, King Dingee by Zom- 
bro, dam by Diablo. 



Jack Groom, who has his string of nine horses 
stabied at Alameda, is not trying to give them any 
track work at present, but jogs them for exercise 
on the splendid roads in the vicinity of the encinal 
town, and will probably return to Pleasanton in a 
couple of months. He reports the mare Sophia 
Dillon in fine shape, and as she trotted a mile in 
2:13% last fall with the last half in 1:05, he thinks 
she will do to race this year in the green classes. 
A pacer Harold G. by Searchlight out of a Chas. 
Derby mare, showed him a quarter in 30 seconds 
as a three-year-old and is now four. Starlock, his 
colt by Zolock out of a Gossiper mare will not 
be three years old until next August. He is look- 
ing well and growing into a handsome youngster. 
Groom is jogging two fillies by Monterey 2:09% out 
of Electioneer mares that look promising enough 
to train for speed. They are owned by Dr.Vowinkle 
fo San Francisco. A four-year-old Searchlight geld- 
ing from a Richard's Elector mare, is a pacer and 
a good one and there is also a Chas. Derby mare 
that seems to have some class. He is breaking to 
drive a couple of thoroughbreds that were purchased 
at a recent sale. They are coming two-years-old 
and their owner thinks the best way to begin their 
training is to have them learn how to pull a cart 
and get accustomed to all city sights. Jack don't 
think either will make a 2:10 trotter but says they 
show a good road gait. 

o 

The recent public sales held in different parts of 
the country from East to West, are again a proof 
positive of the sound foundation on which the busi- 
ness rests and on which conservative breeders may 
safely base their future efforts. 



GRAND MATINEE AT LOS ANGELES JAN. 30. 



TheLos Angeles Driving Club was to have held 
one of its matinees on January 9th, but owing to 
the bad weather it was postponed until the 16th. 
Continued rain has caused it to be declared off and 
the board of directors has decided to give a grand 
matinee on January 30th, during the meeting here of 
the Live Stock Association. Inducements have been 
offered by the club with the view of securing the 
entries of that good young trotter, Kid Wilkes and 
Homer Rutherford's R. Ambush, and his pacer De- 
lilah to try conclusions with the local horses in the 
free-for-all trot, and free-for-all pace. If they can be 
secured, the free-for-all trot with Romeo, timed in 
race in 2:10%,Rapidan Dillon, trial 2:10%;Ida Miller- 
ton, trial 2:10; Kid Wilkes, matinee record 2:10%; 
and R. Ambush 2:09%, should make a trotting race 
worth going miles to see, for all are good actors 
and in shape to race to their marks. 

The free-for-all pace would include Delilah 2:07%, 
Siegfried, trial 2:09% (last week); Dewey, Mandolin 
and Lohengrin. These, with the slower classes, will 
make an attractive program. 

The Curtis syndicate of Redlands, that bought 
the pacer Velox 2:09% by Zolock, recently, has 
turned the chestnut stallion over to Ted Hays of 
Agricultural Park to train and race this season. The 
contract lasts till December 1st next. Hays' plans 
are to take Velox to Pleasanton where he goes about 
the first of the month, with Bon Voyage 2:12%, who 
will make the season there, and get the pacer and his 
own horse Alsandra 2:12 ready for the campaign 
down the Grand Circuit next summer. 

After Bon Voyage's season he will be given a 
complete rest for a year and then in 1910 be trained 
and started over a good track to lower his record. 
That he will do so materially, there is no doubt, 
for when in shape he has stepped a quarter in 29 
seconds. 

Bon Vivant, Voyageur, Jean Val Jean and Viati- 
cum, the yearling colts (two-year-olds now) by Bon 
Voyage that all worked quarters in from 33 to 34 
seconds last month, are let up for a month or so. 
The first three are owned by W. A. Clark, Jr., the 
owner of their sire and are in Walter Maben's 
hands. The last is owned and trained by Ted Hays, 
who worked him a mile last June in 2:38, a half in 
1:15 and a quarter in 35 seconds. They are all 
large, fine looking stud colts and absolutely pure 
genteel trotters that go as light as possible all around 
and wear few boots and these only for protection. 

Owing to the wet weather and bad track little has 
been done at Agricultural Park for the last ten 
days. A few horses have changed hands. Dewey, 
trial 2:08%, the brown horse by Little Dock was 
sold by E. A. Ingram to John Nickerson for some- 
thing like $900; the figure is not definitely known 
as some real estate figured in the deal. L. E. Mc- 
Lellan bought the gray pacing gelding Henry N., mat- 
inee record 2:09%, from Henry N. Henderson, terms 
private, and Geo. Tofflin is here now from Van- 
couver dickering for Neer Girl, trial 2:18 trotting, 
by Neernut, dam Verona, and by this time has in all 
probability bought her, as he wants something for 
the road and to breed to a Wilkes colt he has at 
home. She has the best of manners, is well bred 
and fast enough to win matinees in her class. 

Henry Delaney received a mare from Santa Rosa 
the first of December that acts like a trotter. She 
is five years old and up to the time of her arrival 
here had not had a harness on in a year, though she 
had had some training as a three-year-old and was 
credited with a mile trial in 2:17. She has come 
very fast for Delaney and worked a mile a few days 
ago in 2:24%, last quarter in 35% seconds as if it 
was play. She wears no rigging and practically 
no boots. 

Will G. Durfee is jogging both Copa de Oro 2:03% 
and Carlokin 2:08% barefoot every day on the track. 
Both horses are looking and feeling fine. 

Charles Durfee has his string of five stabled next 
to his son and the veteran is working or jogging 
something every day. He is glad to get back to 
his old stamping ground and even the rain of the 
last few days has not dampened his spirits or good 
humor. 

J. S. Stewart has a black filly by Zombro that is 
getting to be the talk of the track. She is three- 
years-old and can fairly run away on a pace and 
with the most perfect and frictionless wav of going. 

J. 

o 

Charley Dean, the successful trainer who had 
Minor Heir 1:59% and Fleming Boy 2:07% in his 
string last year, will train a yearling daughter of 
Kinney Lou 2:07% this year that is owned by H. M. 
Norton of Lafayette, Indiana. The filly is out of the 
dam of J. B. D. 2:10%, and is believed by Mr. Nor- 
ton to be the fastest and best youngster he has 
ever bred. 

o 

3 IX ONE OIL COMPANY DISTRIBUTES PLUMS TO 
EMPI.OVKKS. 



Following an established custom at Christmas time, 
tills year the 3 In One Oil Company distributed a share 
of its profits with its employees. 

All of the employees at the 3 In One Company's 
model factory at Rahwf.y, N. J„ received a Christmas 
plum in (he form of cash at the rate of six per cent of 
their annual salary. 

This profit-sharing policy was inaugurated by Mr. 
Slee, President of the 3 In One Oil Company, who thor- 
oughly believes in bringing as much happiness into 
the lives of his factory workers as possible. 

While there are many millions of people all over the 
world who swear by the 3 In One for lubricating, 
cleaning, polishing and preventing rust, there are no 
more enthusiastic believers in it thaji these actual 
workers right in the factory who make it, bottle 
it and get it in shape for the market. 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



J 



EASTERN ITEMS. 



Miss Rita 2:08%, by J. J. Audubon, is credited with 
four new performers, records taken in 1908 — two 
trotters and two pacers. 



Columbus holds the world's record for the fastest 
average time made in a single day's meeting — nine 
heats, which averaged 2:05-03, made September 21, 
1908. 



Judge E. A. Colburn, of Denver, Colo., owner of 
stallion Silkwood 2:07, has a fast green trotter in 
Delphin Delmas by Gregory the Great. 



Ideal Stock Farm, East Aurora, N. Y., has sold 
to George H. Estabrook, Denver, Colo., the two-year- 
old filly Eva Direct, by Lord Direct, dam Eva Chimes, 
by Chimes 5348. 



Charles Sanders, the owner of the unbeaten trot- 
ting gelding Uhlan 2:07%, recently refused an offer of 
$15,000 for last year's Walnut Hall Cup winner. 



Millard Saunders thinks Ruth Dillon 2:06% will 
take the measure of Hamburg Belle 2:04% and Jack 
Ley burn 2:04% in the 2:05 classes next season. 



Robert N. Newton, the widely known starting 
judge of Yorkville, Illinois, has been elected cashier 
of the First National Bank, Billings, Montana, and 
will make that place his home in the future. 



Lettia 2:18%, dam of Lillian R. 2:04%, is to be 
bred in 1909 to Great Heart, p. 2:12%, the sire of 
Wilkes Heart 2:06%, Octoo 2:07y 2 and Thelma 
2:09%. 



It is said that the trotting stallion Robinola 2:19% 
by Robin is expected to become one of the horse 
show sensations. He is owned by E. T. Stotesbury, 
Philadelphia. 



Brooklyn, N. Y., horsemen enjoyed their first 
sleigh ride of the season on Thursday last. Andy 
McDowell won the wine as the first outer at the 
Spotwood with Billy Medium. 



Norvalson 2:21% the son of Norval 2:13%, who 
has given the horse world such a great race mare 
as Citation 2:01% is only credited with four other 
standard performers. 



Among the trainers that are already located at 
Memphis, Tenn., are Ed. Geers, John Benyon, Frank 
Wickersham, James Hogan, R. W. Rosemire, J. L. 
Dodge, W. H. Harrison, William Rash and others. 



The young stallion Directwell by Direct, dam 
Annie Allerton 2:15% (dam of Ann Direct 2:12%) 
by Allerton 2:09%, owned by Fred C. Schlegel, Chil- 
licothe, Ohio, is attracting a great deal of attention 
among the breeders and horsemen of Central and 
Southern Ohio. Directwell was trained at Pleas- 
anton one year in the Butler string. 



The farmers of Ohio are beginning to realize 
that it pays to breed trotters and that a good bred 
and good looking trotter will always bring the 
money at all times. They know that the trotting 
bred horse is one of the most useful of all breeds 
of horses, for all purposes, and he can be raised 
successfully by both large and small breeders. 



A seven-months-old colt, full brother to the world's 
champion Dan Patch 1:55%, has arrived at Oxford, 
Ind., from Goshen, N. Y., where the colt was foaled. 
The dam is again in foal to Joe Patchen 2:01%, and 
is at Parkway Farm. Dan Messner is the owner of 
the youngster and confidently expects that the colt 
will become as famous as his illustrious brother. 



Two mares from Russia have been shipped to 
Lexington to be bred to Axworthy 2:15%. Two 
other mares from the same country have been sent 
over to be bred to McKinney. Axworthy is at 
Mansfield Farm, under the management of R. L. 
Nash. 



Crescent Route 2:08% has been sold by J. F. Mc- 
Kee, Weston, O., to a Russian breeder and is now 
on his way across the water. The reported price 
was $4,000. Negotiations for the sale of the fast- 
est son of the champion Cresceus commenced last 
summer, but were not completed until a few weeks 
ago. 



Another fast one will probably be placed to the 
credit of the dead Heir-at-Law 2:05%, is the green 
mare Heiress Baron, recently bought by a New 
York man from Rollins Stock Farm, Shirley, 111. This 
mare is now six years old and last season trotted 
a mile in 2:11%, and a quarter in 31% seconds. 
She is regarded as much better than a 2:10 trotter 
and will be turned over to one of the leading 
trainers to get ready to race in next season's big 
purses. 



W. H. Knight of Chicago, secretary of the Amer- 
ican Trotting Association, owns one of the last 
living get of Governor Sprague 2:20%, Allen Sprague 
2:30, that will be 32 years old next spring. The old 
horse takes life easily, but is occasionally used by 
members of Mr. Knight's family for a short drive 
in the park. Up to a few years ago Allen Sprague 
had all his old-time speed and often defeated 
younger trotters with much faster records than his 
In the brush races on the Chicago boulevards. 



The stallion Castine by Moko and a full brother 
to Fereno 2:05% has gone back to Kentucky where 
he will be used in the stud. His colts all show a 
lot of speed and there is no question but what he 
will make a good sire. Castine's grandam is the 
dam of McKinney. 



The famous "Maud S. horseshoe" that for over 
twenty years had hung in the great gate at the Glen- 
ville track, Cleveland, has been presented to Mrs. 
William Edwards, widow of Colonel Edwards, who 
was the president of the Cleveland Driving Park Co. 
for many years in the day of its glory and gave 
Maud S. the word "Go" when she trotted her world- 
famous mile in 2:08% there July 30, 1885. 



Before becoming known on the turf, the sensa- 
tional pacing stallion Minor Heir 1:59%, sired a foal 
that is now two years old. This foal is a colt out 
of a mare by Iowa Sentinel 2:29%, sire of the fast 
pacers Wapello Girl 2:07% and Major Gantz 2:08%. 
The colt was bred by a farmer in Iowa, who sold 
him recently at an auction sale of farm stock. A. 
D. Patton, a well-known trainer of Winfield, Iowa, 
bought the colt and now has him in training. 



Horsemen who saw Tempus Fugit 2:07%, rear 
and wheel in a dangerous fashion when J. W. Cor- 
nish was driving him in harness on the Harlem 
River Speedway would have been slow to believe 
that "the cream puff trotter" could be transformed 
into a lady's hack, yet on Christmas Day, scarcely 
a month after C. K. G. Billings bought him for sad- 
dle purposes, visitors to Central Park saw Miss Bill- 
ings riding him on the bridle path, and riding him 
at top speed on a trot. 



E. E. Smathers is among the well-known horsemen 
to be seen daily in the saddle at the Tichenor- Grand 
Riding school. Once a famous amateur reinsman and 
owner of light harness horses, he no longer drives 
on the track or on the road. That he has not lost 
his love for a fast trotter is evinced, however, by 
the fact that he has placed a carte blanche order 
with the Tichenor-Grand Company for the fastest 
one- that can be found in the country that is up to 
carrying his weight and suitable to ride under the 
saddle. 



The announcement made by John E. Madden, fol- 
lowing the sale of his two thoroughbreds Sir Mar- 
tin and Edward to Louis Winans, of Brighton, En- 
gland, that he would devote much of his time the 
coming season to his trotting interests, is the first 
definite statement coming from the master of Ham- 
burg Place that he would go into the trotting game 
on an extensive scale. While it has been known 
that Madden the coming season would make a bid 
for many of the rich prizes on the trotting turf it 
was supposed that he would go to England with his 
thoroughbreds and leave the management of his 
trotters, which race in the name of his two sons, 
Edward and Joseph Madden, in the hands of Billy 
Andrews, but it now seems that the noted horse- 
man will spend as much of his time on the Grand 
Circuit as he will on the race tracks around New 
York. Madden's reappearance on the trotting turf 
after an absence of several years will give an added 
impetus to that branch of the horse industry, and 
horsemen throughout this section regard his return 
as a signal for a much better effort on the part of 
other owners and trainers. It will be remembered 
that Madden began his turf career as a trainer of 
trotters, and although most of his large fortune was 
made on the running turf he has never lost his love 
for the light-harness horse. The Madden horses 
probably will be seen on both the Grand Circuit and 
the Great Western Circuit in 1909." 

— : o 

SAX JO\QVI\ VAI.I.IOl H«»\I)S. 

That the roads throughout the San Joaquin Val- 
ley are in a generally poor condition an I In many 
places absolutely prohibitive; Is the assertion of 
G. S. Eloss, Jr., who recently drove up from the in- 
terior pait of the State in his Studebaker "40" road- 
ster. Bloss, who is a well-known rancher of Merced 
County, purchased his machine about four months 
3RO, and during that time lias been using it exclu- 
sively tor touring all over the valley. 

"The sandy and hilly conditions of the roads have 
given autoists Of late considerable trouble." said 
Bloss, yesterday, "and in addition to this, much 
damage has been caused by the rains. But, I am 
safe in saying that in no part of the State are the 
roads in such n deplorable state as in Merced 
County." 

According to Bloss. during the four months that 
he has driven his Studebaker he has not had one 
instant's trouble with the machine in any manner 

and says be has been much surprised by Hie splendid 
Showing the car has made for Its durability. 

ill l : POP1 LAB toomky PWHTO3CT CUSHION TIRE 
CART. 

Washington c. it. o.. December 21, 1908. 

S. Toomey & Co.. Canal Dover. Ohio: 
Dear Sirs: 

I wish to «ay that the Perfect Cushion Tire Cart 
that 1 bought from you last Spring is. I think, the best 
Road and Jog Cart In the world. It rides as easy as a 
buggy, is almost unbreakable and looks good and 
neat. A horse will look good to It from a weanling 
colt to a horse 18 hands high. I use It to jog Hogun to 
and break all my colts to It. You are to be con- 
gratulated on being the makers of the best cart In 
every way that was ever put on the market. 

Yours truly, 

DR. V. P. SMITH. 
NORTH YAKIMA, Washington, December 2, 1908. 
8. Toomey & Co., Canal Dover, Ohio: 
Dear Sirs: 

The Perfect Cushion Tire Cart I received some 
months ago proved satisfactory In every respect. I 
think your cart Is well named, as I have found It to be 
perfect. 

Respectfully. 

JOHN A. LINDSTROM. 



ARTHUR THOMAS SEES WASHINGTON 
McKINNEY. 



The well known horseman, Arthur C. Thomas, of 
Benson, Nebraska, recently visited King Hill Farm, 
Missouri, the new home of Washington McKinney, 
and wrote as follows about the horse to the Chicago 
Horse Review: 

Benson, Neb., Dec. 29, 1908. 

Editor Review: I have just returned from a trip 
to St. Joseph, Mo., to see Mr. John Donovan's new 
stallion, Washington McKinney 2:17%, at King Hill 
Stock Farm, and was so favorably impressed with 
him that I would like to be one of the first to spread 
his praises abroad, for the advent of this stallion 
into Missouri is bound to have a lasting effect on 
the breed of trotting horses in the Missouri Valley. 

If he is not the handsomest trotter in the world 
today, all things considered, I will close up shop 
and go a long ways for a sight of his superior. I 
had heard that he was a great horse, as you have, 
too, but my expectations were not keyed up to the 
real thing and I predict that the horsemen of the 
West will get into the pilgrimage habit to see Wash- 
ington McKinney, just as the Eastern horsemen used 
to visit Village Farm to see Mambrino King. Wash- 
ington McKinney is the horse that sired eight young 
trotters that took records in one afternoon. He is 
also the sire of two others, including Lady McKin- 
ney 2:19%, trial 2:09%. 

When you commence to get your spring letters 
about the annual crop of California wonders, Mr. 
Editor, just keep your eyes open for Lady McKinney. 
Her owner has promised to do certain things over the 
Santa Rosa track in — but that's not for publication. 

Washington McKinney stands a little over 16 hands, 
weighs over 1,200 pounds, is a raven black, with 
intelligent head, fine ears, beautiful arched neck, 
mane and tail. He is, of course, by McKinney 2:11%, 
from a line of producing California mares. Wash- 
ington McKinney is a great sight in harness and 
if Mr. Donovan's plans do not miscarry, will be seen 
on the Grand Circuit next season. 

I saw another remarkable sight at King Hill. Con- 
stantine was hitched up for the first time in three 
years and brushed on the farm track. He made as 
impressive an exhibition as the McKinney horse and 
looked about half as old as he really is, twenty-two. 
The yearling crop of foals by Constantine, out of 
Mr. Donovan's great band of brood mares, headed 
by Carpet, dam of General Watts, 3, 2:06%, was the 
trottingest bunch of young stuff I have seen in 
many a day. ARTHUR C. THOMAS. 
o 

SAN FRANCISCO SUPERVISORS FAVOR BILL. 



At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors of San 
Francisco held on Monday last the following pre- 
amble and resolution were adopted with only three 
dissenting votes out of the eighteen members. 

Whereas, Such gambling as is conducted in pool- 
rooms and betting-rings is a menace to public morals 
and opposed to sound public policy, as abundantly 
proved by the long list of defalcations, wrecked 
homes and suicides in this city resulting from the 
operation of the race track at Emeryville and other 
places where bookmaking or poolselling are con- 
ducted; and 

Whereas, Ordinance No. 66 and the other or- 
dinances amendatory thereof for the prohibition of 
poolselling are rendered inoperative by reason of 
the absence of State regulation, which enables the 
Emeryville race track, within easy access, to freely 
practice that which is prohibited in the city, there- 
by entailing an enormous money drain, largely in- 
creasing crime, and in many ways seriously affecting 
the moral and material interests of the city; and 

Whereas, Efforts to prevent crime are more effect- 
ive, humane and economical than measures to pun- 
ish criminals; and 

Whereas, A determined effort is being made to 
enact laws to prohibit bookmaking and poolselling 
throughout the State, and only through such action 
can the will of the people of this municipality as 
expressed in the ordinance heretofore adopted be 
made effective; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Board of Supervisors of the city 
and county of San Francisco that the members of 
the Legislature of the State of California, represent- 
ing the districts comprising this city and county, be 
requested to do all in their power to further action 
so obviously for the best interests of this municipality 
by joining with the other members in the enactment 
of effective laws for the suppression of bookmaking 
and poolselling. 

o 

FAVORS THE ANTI-BETTING BILL. 



RIVERSIDE, Jan. 2.— At the annual meeting of the 
Riverside Driving Club, held last evening at the 
Holyrood Hotel, unanimous approval of the pro- 
posed anti-race track bill was expressed by the mem- 
bers .and resolutions favoring it were unanimously 
passed. Copies of these are to be forwarded to the 
driving clubs of San Bernardino and Santa Ana and 
to members of the State Legislature. 

Directors elected for the coming year are: Her- 
man Stanlay, Axel Nelson, H. P. Zimmerman, J. F. 
Backstrand. G. M. Carrigan. J. T. Garner, G. H. Judd, 
S. R. McDougall and F. S. Pond. W. A. Hayt was 
elected honorary member of the directorate. Officers 
chosen were: J. F. Backstrand, president; H. P. 
Zimmerman, vice-president ; John T. Garner, secre- 
tary; Axel Nelson, G. M. Carrigan and J. T. Gar- 
ner, Speed Committee; Frank Ogden, clerk of the 
course, and Herman Stanley, starter. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



i 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1G, 1909. 



TROTTING IN RUSSIA. 



Last winter's meeting was so brilliantly com- 
menced by Prosty, the fast daughter of Passe Rose, 
by reducing the ice record for one mile to 2:13, con- 
tinued to the end with many record breaking per- 
formances, the most notable of which were perhaps 
those of Trisse, and I may as well commence with 
him. He is a brown horse, 15.1 hands high, foaled 
in 1889, by Baron Rogers 2:09%, dam Isskra 2:21. 
He commenced his career in 1903 as a four-year-old, 
and to date has won over 180,000 roubles. He is 
driven by his owner, Mr. Telegin. In January he 
was started to beat his own ice record for two miles, 
which was then 4:36%. He accomplished his task 
by trotting the distance in 4:54%, the first mile in 
2:14 and the second in 2:20%. The second half of 
the first mile was covered in 1:05, which probably 
accounts for the second mile being so slow. Mr. 
Henry Titer, who witnessed this performance, seemed 
very much pleased with it, but remarked that if 
Trisse had been rated better he would have finished 
at least two seconds faster. 

After this race Trisse was shipped to St. Peters- 
burg, where on the following Sunday he won a four 
verst race (2 2-3 miles) in 6:17%, putting up a new 
record for the distance. On the 24th of February, in 
Moscow, he was started to beat Prosty's mile record 
of 2:13, which he accomplished by going to the half 
in 1:06%, and finishing the mile strong in 2:11%, 
making the second half in 1:05. One week later, on 
the 2nd of March, he was again started to beat his 
two-mile record, and on this occasion Trisse proved 
that he is one of the greatest horses in the world 
by trotting the two miles in 4:30%, the first mile in 
2:13%. and the second in 2:17. He got a premium 
of 18,000 roubles for this performance. 

Baron Rogers was imported to Russia in 1898 and 
was bought by Mr. Telegin, who has in his stud 
about the best band of Orloff brood mares in Rus- 
sia. 

During the last ten years he has had 84 living 
foals, of which 64 faced the starter, of these 43 got 
records better than 2:30, 12 better than 2:20, and 3 
in 2:15 or better. His first get commenced racing in 
1902 and up to 1908 their winnings amounted to over 
70,000 roubles. 

On March 2nd Lamissel, a very handsome bay 
horse, foaled in 1903, by Quartercousin, put up a 
new record for a mile of 2:11 1-8, and Oumnei, an- 
other very handsome son of Quartercousin, foaled in 
1904, lowered the record for that age by trotting one 
verst (2-3 of a mile) in 1:28 5-8, a 2:12% gait. 

It is a great pity that the sire of these two won- 
derful horses died two years ago. The above is 
another proof of the great value of the Orloff cross, 
the Quartermaster blood was never considered much 
in America, yet in Russia it produces trotters of the 
highest order. 

The winter meeting of 1907-1908 cost the Moscow 
Club 87,000 roubles in premiums paid for the above 
new records, besides the 700,000 roubles which were 
distributed in purses. 

The summer meeting although very interesting 
was not up to the winter meeting as regards record 
breaking performances. Early in May, Prosty trotted 
a mile in 2:11 1-8, but failed to show up later. 

This probably was too fast a mile for her, so early 
in the season. On Derby Day Mr. Tanner was pres- 
ent and seemed to enjoy our racing when he saw 
Slabasti "win the Derby in 2:14%, and five horses 
trot in the Emperor's two miles, all of them in 4:35% 
or better. 

Zamissel won this race in 4:33. Another most in- 
teresting race at this meeting was won by Char- 
dash, a son of Baron Rogers, which put up a world's 
race record, I think for three miles by trotting the 
distance in 6:59, the second horse's time was 6:59% 
and the third 7:00%. Nightingale has a three-mile 
record of 6:55%, but she went against time. In 
July Slabosti put up a new record for four-year-olds 
of 2:11 7-8. She is a full sister to Piluga, who held 
the record for three-year-olds and for four-year-olds, 
and now holds the record for aged horses in Russia 
of 2:08%. Slabosti held the record for three-year- 
olds and now holds the one for four-year-olds. This is 
the only instance that I can think of where a full 
brother and sister were both record-breakers. On 
the last day of the meeting there was a special purse 
of 2,000 roubles given for Cresceus, one heat settling 
it; Slabosti won easily in 2:13%; poor old Cresceus 
only fourth in 2:16. The old horse was dead lame 
and could not have been fit to trot a race, having 
landed in Russia less than a month before; but I 
presume we can't criticise his new owner too severely 
when we remember how Mr. Savage made a show of 
the old horse in Minneapolis two or three years ago. 
He was beaten by three horses in this race, but a 
close observer could see what stuff the old horse 
is made of when he went to the quarter in 31 sec- 
onds, making two breaks; his gait can only belong 
to a king of trotters. I hope that he will attain the 
highest fame in the stud in Russia. If he does, after 
the poor success he had in America, then he will do 
more to prove the great value of the Orloff American 
cross than what 1 could write about it in the next 
hundred years. 

This winter's meet commenced on Nov. 14th. On 
the 20th, Krepish. a big gray Orloff horse foaled in 
1903, which Mr. Tanner noticed when he visited Mos- 
cow, and which he mentioned in his letter to the 
Horse Review, put up a new record for Orloff horses 
of 2:15 3-8, and if he keeps good up to the Inter- 
national race, which is to be trotted in St. Peters- 
burg on the 1st of February, he will be a very hard 
horse to beat. An aged American horse has to give 
him 7 seconds and will have to trot a mile on the ice 
In 2:08 to win, in my opinion a very hard task to ac- 



complish for the very best of American horses. 

Slabosti as a half-bred of the same age, only gives 
him 2 seconds and she would have to be at her best 
to beat him. Zamissel gives him 4 seconds and will 
also have to be at his very best to beat him. Trisse 
also gives him 4 seconds. He commenced his fast 
work only about a month ago, so it is very hard to 
say anything about him. Of the American horses 
that are prepared for this race we have Blue Hill and 
Guy Bingen, a half in 1:08 and a quarter in 30 sec- 
onds, and Gay Bingen a half in 1:08, both of them 
are taking their work nicely. I don't hear anything 
about the McKerron horse. I believe he is being 
worked by Fred Keyes. I hope that Mr. Winans will 
send Allen Winter to take part in this race as this 
would make it probably the most interesting race 
that ever was trotted on the ice. 

I just received the information that Zamissel trot- 
ted a mile in St. Petersburg yesterday in 2:13 and 
Oumnei was second in 2:15%. 

Oumnei is the horse that Mr. Tanner said he would 
like to take back to America with him, and there is 
no denying the fact that he is a grand looking horse, 
having a world of speed. 

The St. Petersburg Club has bought Onward Silver, 
2:05%, from the Italians. Thirty-five choice mares 
belonging to the members of that club will be bred 
to him in the spring. It will be most interesting 
to compare his get and that of Cresceus, General 
Forrest, Pan Michael, Blue Hill, Gay Bingen and 
others to the get of our former importations like 
Baron Rogers, Passe Rose, Alvin and Quartercousin. 
The second generation of the Orloff American cross 
have commenced to appear, and although they are 
very good race horses there are no phenamenal per- 
formers among them yet. Those that have three- 
fourths Orloff blood are as good as those that have 
three-fourths American blood, and our breeders have 
a very interesting problem to solve: whether the im- 
provement will be greater by adding American or 
more Orloff blood. 

N. K. FEODOSSUFF, in Chicago Horseman. 

Moscow, Russia. 

o 

NEW YEAR RACES AT RIVERSIDE. 



The program of matinee races run off at the Riv- 
erside Driving park New Year's day did not have 
the attendance it deserved, for the events for the 
most part afforded ample excitement for the specta- 
tors. It was dusk before the last race was finished, 
owing to the delay in getting the third and fourth 
events started. 

The feature of the afternoon's meet was the 
first event, the free-for-all mile handicap, in which 
were entered the following horses, finishing in the 
order named: Dr. F. A. Ramsey's McO'D., Joe Clapp's 
Ira, G. W. Bonnell's Carnegie, C. A. Stewart's Billy, 
W. A. B. Miller's Emerald, Henry Eigenbrod's 
Monk. McO'D. won by a good margin, securing the 
$40 harness put up as a prize for this event. His 
handicap was an eighth of a mile. 

The second event, the 2:35 pace, was won by 
Monk in 2:29, Carnegie secured the first heat in 
2:32%, Dewey finishing second. Monk third and Em- 
erald fourth, Dewey crept up past Carnegie in the 
second heat, but before the wire was reached, Monk 
went to the front and finished first. He repeated 
the performance in the last heat. The time of the 
heats was 2:32%, 2:29 and 2:30 respectively. Car- 
negie finished second, Dewey third and Emerald 
fourth. 

Finishing the sixth in the first heat and first in 
the last two, a San Bernardino horse, Joe Kelly's 
Hiyu, furnished the chief sensation of the afternoon. 
McDougall's Pete won the first heat in 2:35, Deid- 
rick coming in second and Griff third. In the sec- 
ond heat Pete finished second and Diedrick third, 
the time being 2:36. The time in the last heat was 
2:35, Pete again finishing second and Lola Bell 
third. 

J. F. Backstrand's Buena B. won the first heat in 
the 2:40 pace. Lady Patrick finishing second and 
Jessie Wilks third. In the second heat Lady Patrick 
captured first place and Mr. Backstrand put his horse 
in a cart for the third, winning it in 2:31%. The 
time in the first heat was 2:30, the second 2:34. 
Roosevelt finished second and Jessie Wilks third. 

The 2: 30 trot was the last event of the day, darkness 
making it next to impossible to see the participants. 
Peter Beatty's Tom McKinney and L. Foster's Emma 
Z. The former won both heats in 2:30. 

Alva Ingall's Johnnie Jones won the eighth-mile 
dash for runners by a narrow margin over Joe Clapp's 
Pansy, the time being :24%. 

The first prizes in all the events were harness 
sets, the second blankets and the third whips. 

The officials were: Starter, H. G. Stanley; judges, 
J. H. Thompson, Dr. T. I. Fletcher and C. H. Thomas; 
timers, W. A. Hayt, James Campbell and W. L. 
Scott; clerk of the course, Frank Ogden. 

o 

John H. Crabtree, of Hillsboro, 111., sold his two 
celebrated pacing horses, Hedgewood Boy 2:02%, 
and Lady Maud C. 2:04%, for a consideration of 
$40,000 to Richard Wilson, of Rushville, Ind. Hedge- 
wood Boy and Lady Maud C. are own brother and 
sister, and were bred and raised by Mr. Crabtree. 
These horses were sired by Chitwood 5212, son of 
Nutwood: dam Noretta, by Norris 17569; grandam 
Maggie Yeazer ,dam of Walnut Hall 2:08%, by Red 
Wilkes 1749. Both of these horses were very promi- 
nent on the tracks of the country during the past 
season, and now that they are in the hands of Dick 
Wilson, the well-known trainer and driver, will prob- 
ably be very prominent in racing circles the coming 
season. 



PHYSICAL AND MENTAL QUALITIES. 



It is not improbable that 50 years hence little will 
be said about the trot being in the head of the horse. 
It may then be generally recognized that the ana- 
tomical structure of certain animals is such that they 
are better adapted for the trotting than any other 
gait when moving at speed. Planet was a horse 
whose ancestors, on both sides, had been trained for 
generations to race at the running gait yet Planet 
was a natural trotter. When in training he had 
to be punished to make him change from a trot to 
a gallop. Is it reasonable to suppose that it was 
his mental organization that caused him to stick to 
the trot so tenaciously? 

It seems to us much more reasonable that it was 
due to his physical or anatomical structure instead of 
his mental qualities that made him trot. Mambrino, 
the thoroughbred son of imported Messenger, that got 
Abdallah, sire of Rysdyk's Hambletonian, founder of 
the Hambletonian trotting family, and also got Mam- 
brino Paymaster, sire of Mambrino Chief 11, founder 
of the Mambrino Chief trotting family, is another 
case in point. He was bred for a runner. His an- 
cestors on both sides were from running stock. An 
attempt was made to race Mambrino at the running 
gait, but it was not successful. Those who knew 
the horse agreed that he was a slashing-gaited nat- 
ural trotter. 

Why did Mambrino trot? Was it because he had 
deliberated upon the matter and after careful men- 
tal effort decided that he would move his right fore 
and left hind foot at the same time and that when 
they struck the ground he would then extend his left 
fore and right hind foot and continue to move in that 
manner? Was it because the inclination to progress 
in that style was implanted in or evolved from his 
brain? Or was it because his peculiar physical con- 
dition, due to his anatomical structure, the articula- 
tion of his joints, and attachment of his tendons, was 
such that it was natural for him to trot, and easier 
for him to do than to gallop? 

Some colts trot before they are 24 hours old when 
following their dams; others that are by trotting 
sires and from trotting dams pace the first'time they 
are started up. Is it because these youngsters have 
deliberated upon the matter and the one has decided 
in his mind to trot and the other to pace? To argue 
that such is the case is rank nonsense. 

Two horses are by the same sire and from the 
same dam, one is from birth a pure-gaited trotter, 
the other from birth a natural pacer. Is the differ- 
ence in gait due to a difference in the mental organi- 
zation of these foals or to a slight difference at 
some point, not noticeable to the eye of man. in 
their physical structure? Some wild animals are fast, 
natural trotters. The moose belongs to that class. 
It is a natural gait to all members of the moose tribe 
and they can trot fast too. A wild moose will stick 
to the trot with greater tenacity than the best- 
trained trotter that ever wore harness. When going 
at speed he will pass over ditches, logs and even 
low fences at the trotting gait. Is this a mental 
trait peculiar to the moose family? Is it because the 
moose has "trot in his head," or is it due to a struct- 
ure which makes it easier to move at speed at the 
trot than any other gait? Some very fast trotters 
have been produced by mating thoroughbred mares 
with trotting stallions. Was it due to the mental 
qualities transmitted by these trotting sires, or was 
it not rather due to a physical structure favorable 
for trotting action that was imparted by them? It 
has been stated upon good authority that in herds of 
wild horses going at speed upon the plains, some of 
the animals have been known to stick to the trot 
while others were running. Was this owing to a 
peculiar mental organization; or was it due to a 
structure which made the trot a natural gait to those 
particular animals? 

It is known that one-half of the elements which 
enter into the composition of the foal are received 
from the egg cell of the dam. It is generally be-, 
lieved, however, that the sire has greater influence 
in determining the conformation, the structure, or 
at least the outward appearance of the foal than has 
the dam. The produce of a jenny-ass, when mated 
with a male of the horse kind, always bears a 
stronger resemblance to the horse than to the ass. 
On the other hand the produce of a mare mated with 
a jackass always bears a stronger resemblance to 
the ass family than to the horse. The writer has 
long believed that trotting action is due more to 
the structure of an animal and the proportions of 
the various anatomical parts than to the mental qual- 
ities that are inherited from sire and dam; in other 
words that the physical qualities have greater in- 
fluence in determining the gait of a horse than the 
mental qualities. — American Horse Breeder. 

o 

UNJUSTIFIABLE STATEMENT. 



Ed. Hamilton, Legislative correspondent of the 
San Francisco Examiner, in his letter from Sacra- 
mento under date of January 6, wrote: 

"Senator Benjamin Rush of Solano is in a peculiar 
position regarding race-track legislation. He thinks 
his constituents favor closing the tracks; but he 
is a member of the State Board of Agriculture, and 
to stop race-track betting would put an end to the 
State Fair race meet that is under his control." 

That paragraph was doubtless written without 
consulting Senator Rush, inasmuch as the statement 
that "to stop race-track betting would put an end 
to the State Fair race meet," is a perfectly absurd 
one, considering for the past two years there has 
been no betting whatever permitted at the State 
Fair, and the attendance has increased over former 
years, with the prospect of still further increase 
this year and the years to come. 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



RAISING THE MONGOLIAN PHEASANT. 



Pheasant raising and the stocking of different 
localities with a desirable game bird has attracted 
the attention of California sportsmen to quite an ex- 
tent recently, particularly so as there has been es- 
tablished near Haywards, a game farm by the Fish 
Commissioners. Apropos of all this we quote here 
an interesting account of a pheasant farm and pheas- 
ant raising in Washington and which appeared in 
the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 

Probably one of the most interesting subjects to 
the average man today, especially those interested 
in hunting and fishing, is the raising of game and 
game birds in captivity. As game propagating farms 
are comparatively new and few in America, there 
is unusual interest shown in this direction. 

The largest game farms of the West are operated 
by H. L. Dillaway, of Everett, Wash. Mr. Dillaway 
is at present operating two such farms, one in Wash- 
ington and one in Oregon. These farms turn out 
pheasants by the thousands every season. As the 
State of Washington is being regularly stocked with 
Chinese, golden, English and Reeves pheasants, an 
immense amount of interest is shown regarding this 
venture. A visit to one of these game farms fills the 
visitor with wonder at what has been accomplished 
along these lines. 

Cozily nestled away in a snug retreat, out of reach 
of the ordinary track of civilization, among the beau- 
tiful San Juan islands, is the game propagating farm, 
which is turning out hundreds of pheasants, des tided 
to give the sportsmen of this state their future game 
shooting. Not only are the Chinese pheasants raised 
on Mr. Dillaway's farms, but many rarer species. The 
golden, Reeves, Amherst, Japanese, black neck, pure 
white and English pheasants are all raised, but in 
smaller numbers than the Chinese. 

A visitor's approach to these farms is heralded 
first by dogs, then by the birds. The pheasants them- 
selves are regular watch dogs, and in the summer 
particularly are very noisy. Each bird has its own 
individual call, easily recognized in the babe! of 
voices by a trained ear. The golden pheasant is 
especially noisy, and its long wild, piercing shriek can 
be recognized above the voices of the other pheas- 
ants. These calls are merely alarm notes and not 
calls of fear. Any strange person or object will 
easily set the birds to calling, and when hundr?ds 
or thousands of birds shriek in unison the noise is 
deafening. 

Probably the first impression given to a person vis- 
iting these pheasantries is the uniform neatness and 
regularity of the long lines of pens. Acres of land, 
carefully laid out in large, clean pens, no waste 
or rubbish to attract rats, skunks, minks, or other 
vermin. For the first lesson to learn on the pheas- 
ant farm is strict cleanliness. 

To get the points of interest in order, one nat- 
urally should begin with the large, airy egg room 
and carefully follow the birds through each stage 
of production. The pheasants start in laying their 
eggs in March and April and generally continue 
laying up through September. 

Different species lay different numbers of eggs, and 
they are of various colors. For example, the Chinese 
pheasant will lay as high as eighty or eighty-five eggs 
in a season, while the golden will seldom lay over 
twenty of twenty-five eggs. The China's eggs are 
an olive green, while the golden eggs are creamy 
white. 

Eggs are gathered two to three times every day, 
carefully taken to the cool, airy egg rooms, and set 
in boxes of bran, point dow. The Chinese pheasants 
when wild will hatch its own eggs and makes a 
model mother, but when in captivity it loses this 
instinct and refuses to set. The bantams make es- 
pecially fine mothers for pheasants, and these are 
the birds used as foster-mothers on this big farm. 
It requires a large flock of these little fowl to 
do the work, as they are very small and cannot 
cover more than eight or nine eggs at a time. 

It requires twenty-three days to hatch out Chinese 
pheasants, and when they appear they are little, 
tiny fellows, tame as any chickens. They are brown 
in color, with black stripes running down their backs. 

For the first twenty-four hours they are left strictly 
alone with their foster-mother, for nature has pro- 
vided them with nourishment for that length of time. 
At the end of this period they are ready for their 
first meal, and here is where the actual and never- 
ending work begins. Four times a day, every day, 
for many weeks, each little pheasant must receive 
its proper proportion of food. Any change or de- 
viation from the regular clock-work routine, means 
death, not to one or a dozen, but to hundreds of ex- 
pensive birds, and then all the previous good work is 
lost. 

Pheasants naturally love bugs, grubs and insects, 
and when these can be found, will not. willingly touch 
anything else. But it is obviously impossible for 
any one to procure so much natural food, so arti- 
ficial foods must be given. Here is where the good, 
genuine hard work comes in, in feeding the thous- 
ands of little game birds their proper proportion 
of good, nourishing food. 

A proper line of "hospitals" must be arranged to 
care for the weak and sickly babies, as they will 



be promptly trodden to death if left with stronger 
birds. 

Their food while young consists of bugs, grub 
worms and greens, while the artificial foods are hard 
boiled egg, custards and fresh hamburger steak, 
chopped fine. Overfeeding is as bad as underfeeding. 
A proper medium must be reached to avoid killing 
the tender birds, and experience only will give this. 

When the little pheasants are about ten weeks 
old, they will voluntarily leave their foster-mother 
and she can be removed to another setting of eggs. 
Up to this time the little pheasants have had a 
mother to care for them and fight their battles, 
but from now on each bird must care for itself. 

The birds now take on their own peculiarities and 
start to show their wild instincts. They get more 
shy each week, and although occasionally one be- 
comes very tame, this is exceptional. They now take 
to roosting on the ground, and will continue to do 
this all summer. As the wet rainy season starts 
in, they will take their roosts above ground and 
keep always in the open. They will keep under cover 
during the day, but when night conies, never mind 
how cold, windy or snowy it may be, they will go 
out into the open to roost. 

They are terrific fighters. Two grown cock Chinas 
coming together at breeding time will fight to the 
death. Any unusual object brought close to the 
grown birds will drive them frantic with fear. In 
this condition 'they will beat against their barriers 
and kill themselves, and hens in breeding season will 
frequently lay immature or soft shelled eggs after 
such a fright. It stands the pheasant breeder in 
stead to refuse admittance to his pens during the 
summer months for persons understanding the con- 
ditions will not take offense at such a refusal. Par- 
ties visiting pheasantries often cause the death of 
several birds through sheer fright before leaving. 

Cocks and hens look exactly alike until about ten 
weeks old. Then the cock bird begins to show its 
dark green feathering on its head, later on the 
blotchings of colors come out on the breast. At this 
age cocks and hens can be kept together in large 
numbers, but by February the birds must be separ- 
ated for mating. Large numbers of cock birds may 
be safely kept togther at this age if no hens are 
near. The introduction of hens during the breeding 
season will promptly start a furious fight. 

Pheasants being practically wild birds, are here ex- 
ceptionally free from any diseases, and when they 
do appear are the direct fault of the carelessness 
of the keeper. After the birds have reached maturity, 
which is in five months, they are plenty old enough 
to be released to shift for themselves. Birds raised 
in captivity are perfectly able to take care of them- 
selves when let go. They are very light feeders or- 
dinarily, but will deliberately gorge themselves on 
bugs, worms or grubs, and this stuffing themselves 
full does not injure them, while the same amount of 
wheat or grain would promptly cause their deaths. 

The actual releasing of pheasants as carried on by 
Mr. Dillaway is a very interesting process. Wooden 
crates with cloth tops are used to hold the birds 
when being shipped. Generally four pairs of birds 
are shipped to a crate. The birds are caught in 
a large deep cloth scrap net similar to a fisherman's 
landing net. They are then emptied into a crate with- 
out handling at all. A pheasant's legs are very brit- 
tle and will easily break with careless handling, and 
this must be avoided. ' After crating the birds a 
tag is put on the crate with instructions how to re- 
lease them. This reads as follows: 

"Release birds in the evening only, about sunset, 
after scattering wheat near the place where re- 
leased. 

"Remove the wood protecting bars from the top 
of each crate. Set the crate carefull to one side. 

"Carefully cut a hole in the burlap cover, then 
move away in hiding and let the birds take their 
own time to run out. 

"Do not force them to fly. 

"Under no conditions pull out the birds and throw 
them into the air, as they become widely scattered. 

"Release the birds the day they arrive. If birds 
are released in more than one place, great care 
should be taken that even pairs are distributed. 

"Do not release hens in one vicinity and cocks in 
another, or too many cocks in one place. 

"Pheasants should be released near the edge of 
a clearing, preferably near a wheat or oat field, 
close to light cover of brakes and ferns when pos- 
sible. Do not release birds in heavy timber. 

"Post your land to keep off hunters and dogs, and 
give the birds all the care possible. 

"In winter during deep snows scatter wheat for 
the birds." 

Most of the birds which have been released in the 
State of Washington have been under the direct 
supervision of Mr. Dillaway, accompanied by the 
game wardens. After expressing the birds to the 
point of destination, Mr. Dillaway and the wardens 
accompany them to their point of releasing. Here 
the crates are opened and the birds are given their 
own time in coming from the boxes. It. is a mag- 
nificent sight when these gorgeously beautiful pheas- 
ants strut from their crates and realize that they 
are free. Generally the birds scurry away into the 
brush, and will keep together. Frightening them into 



Hying should always be avoided, as they become 
widely scattered. 

One objection raised in releasing Chinese pheas- 
ants was that they would drive away or destroy the 
native grouse or pheasants. This, however, proved 
an amazing mistake, for the Chinese pheasant, in- 
stead of driving away the native birds, mated up with 
them. Shortly after the Chinas were released in 
Oregon a new kind put in its appearance. This very 
beautiful bird was a hybrid, being half Chinese 
pheasant and half wild sooty grouse. Not only this, 
but the surprising Intermingling of hens takes place 
at breeding time, the grouse and Chinas frequently 
laying eggs in one another's nests; and there are 
numerous instances on record where these birds 
have successfully hatched and reared broods, only 
half of which were really theirs. 

Considerable has been said by Seattle hunters re- 
garding the protecting of these birds after being re- 
leased; also whether it would be best to protect the 
hens all the season and allow the cocks only to 
be killed. This matter, when referred to Mr. Dill- 
away, who has given bird life a special study, has 
brought forth some most interesting facts. British 
Columbia has passed a law prohibiting the killing 
of hen pheasants, allowing the cock birds alone to 
be killed. This allows a surplus of hens, and as a 
Chinese pheasant cock will mate up with several, 
the idea has a good basis. However, several other 
items come up for consideration. Old Chinese pheas- 
ant hens will go barren and will not reproduce. Not 
only this, but the old birds will constantly fight off 
the young hens and drive them from the flocks. These 
young two and three-year-old hens are the most pro- 
lific birds, and the ones needed to reproduce. 

Therefore it will be seen that eventually the pro- 
tection of the hens might work an injury. 

Probably one of the most unusual and freakish 
acts of nature comes up at this point. For old bar- 
ren hens will frequently take on the cock plumage, 
either entire or in part. 

In asking Mr. Dillaway his opinion regarding pro- 
tecting pheasants in the State of Washington, he 
states: "All released species of pheasant should 
be protected in this State for about two or three 
years at least. At the end of this time, open the 
season on cock birds only. At the end of three 
years more open the season on hens and cocks for a 
limited period. In tins manner a more uniform bal- 
ance of birds would be left for breeding and many 
of the old useless hens killed off." 

It is only fair that a few words be said to the 
owner of the land on whose property these birds 
are to be released. Where pheasants are not raised 
in too large a quantity they are an immense benefit 
to the farmer or horticulturist, for they are great 
grub, bug and worm destroyers, as well as great 
fly catchers. 

Pheasants in captivity will never touch grain as 
long as live food is fed, likewise the wild Chinese 
pheasants prefer live food to any kinds of grain. 
It would be foolish to assert that they would not 
eat grain, for they will. But they always prefer 
the live food. Reports of pheasants being shot and 
hundreds of wire worms being found in their crops 
are very common. It stands to reason if this bird eats 
hundreds of bugs and grubs in one meal, the amount 
destroyed in a season is almost incredible. William 
Dutcher, president of the National Audubon so- 
cities, figures that the appalling slaughter of in- 
sect eating birds has occasioned an annual loss to 
the farmers and horticulturists of this country of 
over $8,000,000. 

o 

Monterey County Game Preserve — Monterey county 
can soon boast of the finest quail and wild fowl pre- 
serve in the world, and this excellent shooting within 
two hours' ride of the city of Monterey. 

This sportsmen's paradise will be created on the 
R. F. Johnson ranch and Casa Verda, the hunting 
lodge of Hugh Crummey, which are located twenty- 
five miles south of Monterey city in the hills over- 
looking Carmel valley. Casa Verde and the John- 
son ranch join, and together the two places have 
over 27,000 acres of rolling hills, which make an 
ideal hunting ground. 

Casa Verde, with its 17,000 acres has been the 
hunting grounds of Mr. Crummey and his friends for 
a number of yars, and the shooting has been fairly 
good until this year. 

Recently Mr. Crummy and Mr. Johnson decided 
they would stock their ranches with quail and Hun- 
garian pheasants and have some shooting grounds 
to which they could invite their friends with the 
assurance that they could get limit bags in a few 
hours' hunting. 

Twenty-five bundled dozen quail will be secured 
and placed on this big hunting preserve at the close 
of the present season, and these will nest and pro- 
duce flocks for next year's shooting. Fifteen hun- 
dred dozen of the birds are already contracted for 
and the other 1,000 dozen are being negotiated for. 

It is not known how many Hungarian pheasants 
can be secured, but every bird of this variety that 
can be found for sale will be taken. The pheasants 
are an excellent bird for eating and thrive in a re- 
gion similar to that that is to be stocked. 

There will be a couple of keepers on the preserve 
at all times. Feeding places will be established, 
where grain will hi' scattered through the winter, so 
that the birds will stay about the places. 

o 

Drink Jackson'a Napa Soda. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



THE CALIFORNIA VALLEY QUAIL. 



The ideal game bird of this State is found in the 
California valley quail (Californicus Vallicola). Swift 
of flight, true to his instincts and possessing traits 
adapted to the proclivities of the bird dog, this quail 
affords the sportsmen the keenest enjoyment. 

Nimrods who have shot in various lands give testi- 
mony of his superiority after a day's shoot among 
the California quail. Gregorious by nature, he roams 
for most of the year in coveys of from a dozen to a 
hundred or more. But when the nesting season 
comes every Jack finds his Jill and prepares for 
family raising. The nest is made in a hollow in the 
ground, in the grass or weeds. Ten to twenty-four 
eggs are laid, and then the patient wait of twenty- 
three days for incubation. Scarcely has the last 
nestling picked his way to freedom ere all are out to 
follow the parent birds in the quest for food. Even 
if the last to hatch are not all in readiness to leave 
the shell, if legs are free, the little mite will venture 
forth with shell on his back. 

The gallant male will occupy an eminence, top 
fence rail or other coign of vantage, where he stands 
as a lookout while his family is foraging. At the 
approach of danger he sounds the alarm, and if you 
approach in time you may see the tiny specks rush 
to cover, and then — find him if you can, even though 
the ground be as bare as a floor. 

By the time the birds are grown the smaller coveys 
have united, and the shooting season is at hand. 

Thanks to a wise Legislature, the closed season 
for the nesting period is sufficiently long to enable 
the birds to become fully grown. 

Two distinct varieties of California quail exist — 
known locally as the mountain quail and the valley 
quail. The names are somewhat misnomers, so far 
as indicating the topography of the country which 
the two varieties occupy. The mountain variety, 
however, is generally found in a mountainous and 
wooded country, though not infrequently will he 
roam afield in the lower stretches. The valley quail 
is found in both mountain and plain, and seems to 
have little preference in his choice of location so far 
as topography is concerned. 

The mountain quail is somewhat larger than his 
cousin, is of more beautiful plumage, the male and 
female being almost identical in appearance, and 
differs to some extent in instinct. This variety 
cannot be classed as a game bird of great import- 
ance. It is rapidly becoming scarce — in fact now, in 
many sections, may be almost classed as a rara avis. 
It is, therefore, the purpose of this article to deal 
with the more numerous and much more important 
variety — the California quail. 

The male bird of this variety is handsome in 
plumage. The topknot of black and pure white, and 
the breast plumage a beautifully mottled bronze. 
The female is rather plain in appearance compared 
with her mate. The size of the birds is about the 
same as the Eastern bob-white, or perhaps a trifle 
larger. 

The California quail is indigenous to that stretch 
of country extending from Oregon into Lower Cali- 
fornia. He is less numerous in the densely wooded 
and more rainy northern section, is seldom found in 
the higher altitudes of the Sierra Nevada range, but 
seems to find as his ideal environment the drier and 
warmer sections of the plains and valleys of the 
southern and central parts of California. Indeed, he 
is not averse to the cactus-covered semi-arid regions 
of Lower California, Old Mexico, and Arizona. Hunt- 
ing parties frequently go over the line into Lower 
California and find excellent shooting where the 
cactus patches are so thick that the bird dog is 
unable to work. 

The great grain fields, cattle ranges, or vineyards 
offer the best opportunities for the thrift of the bird 
and his pursuit by the hunter. An abundance of 
food, grassy stretches where he can find cover for 
protection, and with water obtainable, make the 
California ranches admirably adapted for this gamest 
of birds. The hunter, too. meets with less resistance 
from the ever-present sign in many places: "No 
hunting allowed," etc. 

The coveys are most likely to be found along the 
willow banks of a creek, up the slope of a sparsely 
wooded hill, or in a canon, and usually not far from 
a thicket where the birds can take refuge if hard 
pressed. The hunter should be equipped with a 12 
or 16-bore double-barreled shotgun of modified choke, 
shells loaded with eight to ten shot, a light hunting 
coat, and good walking shoes. If he would enjoy the 
sport to its fullest, a well-trained setter or pointer 
is essential, for, besides being an ideal bird for the 
marksman, he is as nearly perfection as possible for 
bringing out the finer instincts of the bird dog. When 
first alarmed, the covey will take to wing without 
separating, and will fly to cover. The hunter should 
follow as rapidly as possible, for upon alighting the 
flock will continue on foot and will travel at a sur- 
prisingly rapid pace. Upon being forced to wing a 
second time, the flock, now thoroughly frightened, 
separates and will alight in a scattered condition. 
If the ingenuity or experience of the hunter has 
forced the covey into dry grass or stubble, the finest 
sport will follow. The trained hunting dog soon 
stiffens to point; the hunter approaches to within a 
few yards, or mayhap a few feet, and — Whir-r-r-r! 
straight away goes the little target, swift as a rocket, 
or possibly takes a turn over or around the nearest 
tree or brush, but generally presenting an oppor- 
tunity for a good, quick shot — a "dead bird," and the 
return of the happy retriever with the fluttering lump 
of feathers in his mouth. Another bird is soon up, and 
another, till the hunter, flushed with the keenest 
excitement, stops to cool his gun-barrels or quench 
his parched throat and that of his dog from a handy 



canteen that should be a part of the equipment 
carried, especially if on a bright autumn day. 

The instinct of the bird is to make short flights and 
to hide close when under cover. Frequently both 
hunter and dog will work past a bird within a few 
feet. Ground worked a second time, when birds have 
set, will often result in putting up as many birds as 
the first time worked over. Two, or even more, 
hunters can work out a covey that has been set to a 
better advantage often than can the single hunter. 

While in the more thickly settled and richer agri- 
cultural districts of California quail are now scarce, 
still out on the large ranges they are still to be found 
in great numbers. Thanks, again, to the wise pro- 
vision of the State Legislature, the game hog and 
the market hunter are things of the past. A limit 
bag of twenty-five birds in one day to a hunter, and 
a non-sale clause, have put both out of business— that 
is, openly, but sad to say the initiated and unscrupu- 
lous can and do get "broiled owl" at many French 
restaurants and in some hotels. Once in a while an 
arrest is made, but that does not stop the practice; 
rich patrons pay good prices for what they want 
served in private rooms or suites. 

The precious little bird has felt the opportunity 
given to battle against extinction, and is now, so it 
is reported, on the increase in many places. In fact, 
unless indications are radically misleading, there will 
soon be a concerted effort to re-stock many quail 
sections where the game bird was plentiful but has 
been depleted. 

May he be given every opportunity he deserves, — 
if need be, a five-year prohibitory act, — for California 
would not be California without her oak-covered hills 
and plains, and the plains and hills would be a 
solitude without their piping quail. 

o 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY FISH AND GAME 
REPORT. 



Walter R. Welch, Fish, Fire and Game Warden 
of Santa Cruz County, in his annual report recently 
filed shows that the fish and game situation is in a 
most satisfactory condition. 

The report, which covers much ground, recites that 
the game warden during the past year has patrolled 
the county and its fields and streams, the waters of 
ihe bay and the beaches, continuously, and has 
strictly enforced all fish, game and forestry laws 
and ordinances. He has posted on the county roads 
about 2,000 warning notices and copies of the fish, 
game and forestry laws, and has distributed among 
the people about 5,000 abstracts of said laws and 
leaflets relating to the value and necessiiy of pro- 
tecting song and other birds. During the spring and 
summer months the game warden has kept close 
watch on camps and campers and has searched 
many persons for illicit game or fish. The report 
continues: 

"During the past year I have made 24 arrests 
for violations of the fish, game and forestry laws, 
and fines in the total sum of $320 have been im- 
posed and paid. 

During the past year I have clearly observed the 
conditions afield in this county relative to Hie sup- 
ply of game. 

I am pleased to report to your board that 1 am 
fully satisfied that the supply of deer and tree 
squirrels in this county is steadily increasing. 

Between August 1st and October 1st, 1901, about 
forty deer were killed in in this county. 

Between September 1st and October 1st, 1007, be- 
tween forty and fifty deer were killed in this 
county. 

Between September 1st and October 1st, 1908, over 
one hundred deer were killed in this county. 

While this would seem to be, and is, a large num- 
ber of deer to be killed in one month in so small 
and thickly settled a county as Santa Cruz, since the 
close of the deer shooting on October 1st I have 
gone over a great portion of the territory within 
the county inhabited by deer, where I found ample 
signs and evidence to prove the fact that there still 
remain within the county great numbers of deer, and 
that the supply has not been materially affected 
by the one month of open season. 

During 1907 one would seldom see a tree squir- 
rel. During 1908 I have been able to observe num- 
bers of these little animals of the forest in vari- 
ous sections of the country. 

The supply of quail and other small game seems 
to be a little more plentiful than it was during 1907. 

I report to your honorable board that public senti- 
ment favorable to the strict enforcement of all fish, 
game and forestry laws and ordinances and a proper 
appreciation as to the value of our supply of fish, 
game, song birds and forests, is daily growing 
stronger throughout Santa Cruz county, and that this 
county is abreast of any other county in this State in 
protecting and perpetuating these great and valua- 
ble natural resources. 

The work being done in Santa Cruz county in 
fostering her natural resources is attracting the at- 
tention of every county in this State, as well as the 
attention of many states in the Union. 

I wish to thank your honorable board, the press, 
the teachers in the public schools and the people 
in general for the able assistance and support they 
have rendered me in my efforts to conserve and per- 
petuate the supply of fish, game, song birds and 
forests of Santa Cruz county." 

The game warden recites the game and fish con- 
ditions in all parts of the county are most promis- 
ing, adding many recommendations. 



NORTHERN HUNTING NOTES. 



A report from Seattle early last week gives the 
following interesting data relative to ducks and other 
wild game hunting in Washington: 

The duck shooting throughout the past two weeks 
has been the best of the entire year. Tremendous 
bags are being brought in. 

Probably the most interesting items of last week 
were the releasing of 500 pheasants in northern 
counties, the investigating of the heavy killing of 
ducks on game preserves, and the report of Warden 
Rief, who tells of heavy killings of ducks on Samish 
flats from sneak boats. Careful investigation of one 
train on last Sunday showed forty hunters with 
1,114 ducks. Wardens Rief and Gilkey are hot af- 
ter the sneak boat hunters. 

The game preserves are killing from 1,000 to 
3,000 ducks to a preserve every season, and strong 
efforts are being made by organized sportsmen to 
pass laws prohibiting this shooting over fed grounds. 

The largest shipment of game birds ever made 
in the state of Washington was carried out last 
week, the birds all going into the northwestern 
counties. These birds were Chinese, English, Hun- 
garian, golden and Reeves pheasants. All were pur- 
chased from H. L. Dillaway, of Everett, Wash., be- 
ing shipped in from his big game propagating farms. 
These birds were released as follows: San Juan 
county released 200 English pheasants and ten 
goldens; Whatcom county, 100 Chinese pheasants 
and ten Reeves pheasants; Snohomish county re- 
leased 100 Hungarian and 100 Chinese pheasants. 

The birds were released by Mr. Dillaway, under 
the direct supervision of the game wardens. Over 
1,000 pheasants have been released in these coun- 
ties this season. The close season is now on for 
these birds, and before it opens several counties will 
put a close season on them for at least two years. 
The Reeves pheasant is an entirely new bird in 
America, as far as releasing them to covert. These 
birds grow tail feathers five to seven feet long; they 
are very quick on the wing, much quicker than the 
Chinese, and are larger and delicious eating. They 
hang more to the woods than meadows, and for 
that reason are much harder to kill and harder to 
find. Game Warden Loomis has been persistent 
in his efforts to get this bird started in this state. 

The shooting in Skagit county has been especi- 
ally fine during the several hard blows. In fact, 
this week and up to New Year's the shooting has 
been unusually heavy. At several points the shooting 
has been tremendous. Dozens of parties are shooting 
immense bags. Two men coming into La Conner shot 
128 ducks in six hours from low lying scull boats. 
Reports from La Conner, Samish, Edison and Su- 
mas all tell of very heavy bags killed, many of them 
three to four times over the bag limit. No attempt, 
apparently, is being made to stop this heavy killing. 

This week is especially marked by the great num- 
ber of brant being killed. Several parties have been 
planning boats suitable for killing these birds and 
have apparently been successful, for two men went 
out in one scull boat and brought in twenty-eight 
brant in one day. A second boat shot eighteen and 
another ten. This is the heaviest killing done for 
months on brant. The killings made on the club 
preserves are something terrific. Members coming 
out this week average fifty ducks each, many par- 
ties bringing out 200 and 300 birds. 

In Whatcom county the duck shooting has been un- 
usually good the past week and hardly a 
hunter has been coming without a good string of 
birds. On December- 21, 23, 25, 28 the heavy winds 
kicked up big seas, and the accompanying rains 
broke up the immense flocks of birds and sent them 
scurrying to shelter. As usual, the hunters who 
could do so, quickly boarded the trains and hurried 
out to their favorite shoting places. All the hunters 
returning bring good reports and fair bags. Sandy 
Point proved an especially fine spot during this 
blow, the birds piling in over the favorable points 
in small bunches, but flying low and in fast suc- 
cession. 

Allen F. Gill and F. P. Robertson of Spokane, left 
for a hunting trip this week near Moses lake south 
of Spokane. The hunters became separated dur- 
ing the day and Mr. Gill could not be found. A 
search party was promptly made up and started on 
his trail. At dark the party came upon his lifeless 
body in the brush near the trail. The back of his 
head was blown away and his own shotgun, lying 
just behind him, showed that the gun had been 
accidentally discharged while he was dragging it 
through the brush. Allen F. Gill was formerly city 
engineer of Spokane. 

William Hoskins, of Juneau, a famous trapper and 
guide, left that place in a 24-foot sailing sloop, bound 
for Seattle. After being out four weeks in heady 
storms Hoskins only made about twenty-four miles. 
One of the halibut fleet finally located him and his 
boat in Taku harbor. Hoskins met with terrific 
gales near Sumdum. and while tacking 'past Midway 
island was driven ashore. The vessel was wrecked, 
but Hoskins escaped unhurt. 

Mr. George M. Bowers, United States Fish Com- 
missioner, graphically depicts the great destruction 
wrought to certain snecies of fish and is making an 
earnest appeal for their preservation. Mr. Bower 
states: "The most serious condition now confront- 
ing the American fishery industry is the failure of 
the states to afford adequate protection to migra- 
tory fishes in state and interstate waters." 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Duck Hunting — The almost steady downpour of 
rain for a week and more has played hob with local 
sportsmen who fancy duck shooting. The birds 
have left the zone of the southeast storms and scat- 
tered in many directions, for shelter first and to the 
new feeding grounds for a change of diet. 

Reports from many interior points also note a dis- 
appearance of the birds from their late haunts. 

The ducks and geese have gone by thousands down 
the San Joaquin Valley, or further south to the Im- 
perial Valley or the Colorado Delta. 

Shooters who hunted at Los Banos, Gustine, Fire- 
baughs, Newmans, etc., last Sunday and during the 
week shot many limits. 

Sacramento hunting conditions this week are 
given as follows: 

Three weeks ago all the duck hunters of this sec- 
tion w-ere praying for water on the dry marshes. To- 
day half of these same hunters are bemoaning the 
fact that the water is there, at least in such large 
quantities. At one time it is not water enough, and 
in a few days the complaint is just the reverse. 
It only goes to show how fastidious are the tastes 
of the average shotgun artist. 

The moisture has surely arrived in enormous and 
wet quanities on the marshes, and while one class 
of duck hunters, the members of the gun clubs, are 
dissatisfied, the other class, the market hunters and 
those not members of the gun clubs, are more than 
pleased with the prospects. The water on the pre- 
serves has inundated the feed grounds which have 
been attracting the birds, while a like amount of 
deluge on the marshes has started new feed grounds 
and placed hunting at the easy disposal of the av- 
erage man. The market hunters are reveling in this 
recent storm and are bringing in nice bags of the 
birds. 

The members of the Big Lake Gun Club now have 
another complaint. For a time the grounds were left 
as barren as a desert, and now the members have 
had to do the Noah act and get away from the ris- 
ing waters. The two contrasting states of affairs 
have not furnished any kind of sport either. 

Though the members of the Monitor Club found 
more water than they desired on the preserves on 
Sunday, every one of the party succeeded in land- 
ing a nice bag. Some fine big mallard were slain 
during the day, John Guisto being high in the kill on 
mallard, with fourteen to his credit. The flight 
of these big birds served to break the monotony of a 
constant teal shoot. 

The members of the Monitor party Sunday were: 
Louis Smith, John Guisto, Frank Waterman, George 
Burnett, Lee Davis, Joe Carey, Charles Demerritt, 
J. M. Barry, Lee Gorman, Ralph Jost, V. Calegori 
and B. H. Gallup. 

L. Upson and Frank Newbert and guest had a 
nice quail shoot on the Del Paso ranch this week, 
each succeeding in bagging the limit. Getting the 
limit on quail with conditions as they have been 
around Sacramento is something of an achievement. 



To Amend the Game Laws — A bill to stop duck 
hunting from motor boats will be introduced into 
the Assembly by Edward I. Butler, of San Rafael. 

It is not the havoc wrought in the ranks of the 
ducks by these gentlemen (?) sports that prompts 
the legislation, as the bags obtained from boats are 
comparatively small. But the tireless water hounds 
never allow the game birds one moment of rest, 
causing them to leave for distant feeding grounds. 

The bill will affect both bay and river shooting. 

Comparatively few motor boats are used on the 
Sacramento, but the bays are hounded by fleets of 
these boats during the day. 

It is the custom of the ducks to feed in ponds and 
along the banks at night, anchoring at rest in the 
middle of the bay during the daytime. 

Knowing this, the hunters in the motor boats head 
for the open water, frightening the birds and fol- 
lowing them for miles. This chase, participated In 
by a score or more of boats, keeps the birds con- 
stantly on the wing and drives them away from 
their accustomed haunts. 

Assemblyman Butler estimates that fully five 
times as much damage is done through hunting 
from motor boats as with dog and gun on the shore. 

Another bill bearing upon the game laws may reg- 
ulate the dumping of materials menacing to ducks 
into the rivers and bays. A few years ago San 
Rafael bay was the scene of a terrible slaughter 
of ducks from a sticky substance covering the water 
with a scum. Hundreds of ducks, closely packed 
along the shore for miles, were dead from this 
cause, and the same trouble was repeated to a 
smaller extent this year. A bill governing this will 
probably be introduced later. 



Hungarian Partridges — The Fish Commission re- 
ceived last week, per Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express 
a consignment from Bohemia of 550 Hungarian part- 
ridges. The birds wer three weeks en route and the 
total loss was but fifteen, a remarkable showing in 
the shipment of wild birds for so long a trip. Many 
of the new game birds were immediately sent to 
different points in Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, Sacra- 
mento, Tehama, Amador, Calveras, the southern part 
of the State, etc., and to the recently established 
game farm at Haywards. The birds arrived here in 
fine condition and were shipped in cages divided into 
six pens. Four and five birds were placed in each 
pen. 

These Hungarian or black partridges are a very 
beautiful game bird, with the important qualifica- 
tion of thriving and finding a congenial habitat close 
to and in settled and cultivated districts. They have 



been already liberated in fourteen different coun- 
ties in this State, from Siskiyou to San Diego. Re- 
ports have received to the effect that the newcomers 
have taken to their changed environment, pairing 
last year and raising many broods of young chicks. 
Conditions of climate and country here are practi- 
cally the same as in the country they came from it is 
reported. 

These birds, it is claimed, will get along in har- 
mony with our valley quail. They are, in size, a 
little larger than the California mauntain quail, with 
a mottled breast and cinnamon colored feathers on 
the head. A distinguishing mark is the white spot 
on the breast. In habits they are somewhat similar 
to the Bob White quail, being more of a ground or 
open field bird than our valley quail. 

This is the third shipment of these partridges to 
this State. Thirty pair were sent to Sacramento 
county, most of them being liberated on the Grant 
ranch — the Rancho del Paso — where they will be 
safe from harm. The "Bob Whites" put out on the 
tract several years ago have increased to a pleasing 
degree. Three dozen of the new arrivals were placed 
in Tehama county on the George Vestal and Cone 
ranches. They will shortly be liberated in the foot- 
hills and along the river bottoms. 

There is a close season at all times on partridges, 
pheasants and all game birds imported for propaga- 
tion and a heavy fine awaits, upon conviction, any 
one who hunts and shoots them. 



Quail for Re-Stocking — The Fish Commission has 
been distributing quail from Southern California in 
several counties bordering on the Sacramento Val- 
ley. Amador and Calaveras counties have been fa- 
vored in this manner recently, when eight dozen of 
the quail were released in localities adapted to their 
habits, where they can mingle with the native quail 
and improve and multiply the game of the foothill 
sections. Quail have become scarce the past few 
years in this end of the State, owing to the great 
number of hunters that go otu after them during the 
open season, and they do not seem to multiply as 
rapidly as they should. The Southern California 
quail is said to be a hardier bird and improvement 
is expected to be noted when the imported ones mate 
with the natives. 



New Gun Club — The Urbita Gun Club was or- 
ganized by San Bernardino sportsmen last week with 
a membership of twenty-five. 

Officers elected were: President, Chris Hartman; 
secretary, Josh Draper; treasurer, Robert Cathcart. 

Committees were named as follows: Membership — 
Hal Rodden, Robert Cathcart, Frank Smith. 

General arrangements — Josh Draper, O. W. Kern, 
Robert Cathcart. 

The club will have a pistol, rifle and shotgun 
range, with targets, traps and all other devices for 
carrying on a successful gun club. When the or- 
ganization gets into action it is probable that tour- 
naments will be held and contests with other clubs 
pulled off. There are a number of fine shots in the 
city who could make a good showing. 



Quail Getting Scarce — An investigation of a re- 
port that the quail in the vicinity of Auburn are af- 
fected by a peculiar throat trouble and are dying 
off in great numbers, has proven there is no truth 
in the report. With a single exception none of 
those with whom The Bee correspondent talked knew 
anything about such a disease among the quail. One 
man stated that he had run across three dead quail 
in the brush, not far from Auburn, but did not notice 
anything peculiar about the -birds, merely presum- 
ing that they had been shot and lost by hunters. 

However, if there is -no prevalent disease among 
the quail around Auburn that has taken them off, 
there is at least such a scarcity of the toothsome 
game birds hereabouts to create great comment 
among the local nimrods. The birds were never 
scarcer and less in evidence than right now, and 
the local hunters have gotten so disgusted with the 
paucity of this kind of game that they have quit 
going out into the woods after quail. 

Most all of the local hunters lay this scarcity of 
quail to the blue jays, which eat the quail eggs; also 
to coyotes and foxes, which destroy the young birds. 
The coyotes and foxes on the river hills, east and 
south of town, are more in evidence than ever. 



Black Bass Protected — The Kern County Super 
visors have passed an ordinance prohibiting the 
taking of black bass in the county from February 1, 
1909 till June 1, 1910. This close season is placed 
on black bass recently placed in Kern river and will 
result in much ultimate good, the Kern river and 
tributaries being ideal waters for black bass. 



Angling Notes — A few steelhead were caught at 
Point Reyes last Sunday, two large ones and some 
small fish. The weather was clear and cold. 

The rains have put a ban, for the time being, on 
further steelhead fishing. 

Striped bass anglers were also handicapped by 
contrary weather conditions, those who journeyed to 
Wingo or San Antone returned with empty creels. 



Quail Plentiful— A party of Porterville Sportsmen, 
Harvey Frame, Jesse Frame and Tom Ferguson last 
week hunted on the Flory ranch, west of that town, 
and found birds plenty and laying close— they had 
to be fairly kicked out of the low cover. The shoot- 
ers got a fair bag and had a day's excellent sport. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Welcome Visitors — Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Reid Thor- 
burn, of Portland, were in San Francisco recently 
on a brief visit and were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Phil Wand. An important adjunct of the Thor- 
burn party was Master Bride Donaldson Thorburn, 
a sturdy and handsome youngster of 19 months. 
Bride and Ch. Meg Merrilies II are great pals and 
inseparable companions at home. He has the dis- 
tinction of being the youngest Bench Show Commit- 
teeman on record for a show. We refer to the Bull 
Terrier Club outing and one day show at Englewood 
a year ago. Bride slept during the show, he might, 
like many an older or more matured committeeman, 
have raised a rumpus, but he didn't. Meg has a 
litter of eleven splendid puppies she is now looking 
after, all coming on finely. 

While here Mr. and Mrs. Thorburn were tendered 
a dinner at Mr. Wand's residence. Mr. Elliott H. 
Pierce, Mr. A. F. Kindt and the writer were pres- 
ent. 

Mr. Thorburn states that doggy affairs are looking 
up in the north with the prospect of a circuit of 
shows this year. 



Record Price for a Bulldog — A report this week 
from Los Angeles states that Charles G. Gates pur- 
chased the bulldog Nominator Superior from Bryce 
D. Palmer of Manchester, England, for $8,500. Mr. 
Palmer is spending the winter on a ranch near Point 
Loma. 

Last Wednesday Gates captured $28,650 from the 
Santa Anita bookmakers. He went into Los Angeles 
with the money fairly screaming for recognition and 
with the recklessness of an easy winner he threw 
the little bills and gold pieces to the four winds. 

With his huge roll still in his hand Mr. Gates be- 
gan his career as a canine purchaser, that is, he 
began to spend his surplus cash on puppies. 

His first investment was in a small dog, valued 
at $35, which he bought for the exceedingly low price 
of $500. He then gave it to the cashier at the Al- 
exandria Hotel. Next he secured a $50 puppy, but 
meeting a young woman who took his fancy pup No. 
2 vanished into oblivion. But to cap the climax 
of his dog purchases the young plunger became en- 
amored of a handsome bulldog and as the result 
parted with the sum of $8,500. 

Mr. Gates broke another record, however. He 
has paid the highest price paid for a dog ever reg- 
istered in this country. 

Mr. Gates is sadly in need of a guardian. 



A Good One Gone — Mr. Freeman Ford's good Bos- 
ton terrier Ch. Agawam-of-by-the-Way joined the 
canine majority on New Year's Day. She was a 
winner in the East and won at several Coast shows. 

A press account states that Mr. Ford recently re- 
turned from an extended trip through the East and 
he brought back the finest Boston toy terrier that 
has ever been seen in Southern California. The lit- 
tle fellow who tips the scales at 10*4 pounds, an- 
swers to the name of Arroyo Contest. He has won 
a number of prizes in competition, at the last East- 
ern show where he was entered, he took the first 
prize in a field of forty Boston toys. 

Mr. Ford has about fifty dogs at present in his 
Arroyo Kennels and he will enter a number of the 
best in the next show of the Pasadena Kennel club, 
which will probably be held next month. 



Coast Field Trials— The Pacific Coast Field Trials 
Club's twenty-sixth annual trials will start on the 
Stockdale Ranch near Bakersfield, on Monday, Jan- 
uary 25. Mr. O. D. Opdyke of Seattle, who judged 
the Washington trials last year, will officiate in the 
saddle. Mr. Opdyke will be assisted by two mem- 
bers of the club. Four events: the Derby, All-age, 
Members and Champion Stakes are on the program. 
The Derby has 18 entries this year. The meeting 
promises to be a successful one and there will be 
a good attendance of Coast field trial enthusiasts. 



A Good Setter — Sven C, Phil Wand's handsome and 
winning young English Setter, has developed into a 
grand looking young field dog. He has been taken 
afield and worked on birds and has shown decidedly 
clever qualities and lots of bird sense. Sven is 
by Fred P. Butler's Ch. Tiverton, out of Danstone's 
Queen and reflects credit on his breeding. 

o ■ 

Angler's Election — At a meeting of the Board of 
Directors of the California Anglers' Association held 
Monday evening, the following officers were elected 
for the coming year: D. M. Sachs, who held the of- 
fice of vice-president last year, was elected to the 
position of president for the coming term. The 
other officers chosen were: Vice-president, Achille 
Roos; second vice-president Charles M. Belshaw; 
secretary, W. R. Eaton; treasurer, Western National 
Hank. The members of the Finance Committee are 
J. Pincns, John Boedefeld, J. Uri. 

The board of directors of the Association con- 
sists of the following well-known local fishermen: 
C. R. Overholtzer, Dr. C. E. Leithead, C. F. Breld- 
enstein, George A. Wentworth, James Lynch, W. J. 
Street, H. Copeland, H. B. Gosliner, L. Levy, W. A. 
L. Miller. 

The Association will advocate a number of changes 
in the fish laws at the present session of the Legis- 
lature and will be represented at Sacramento by 
George A. Wentworth. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



THE FARM 

HOG CHOLERA. 



The losses from hog cholera in the 
various state annually amount to many 
millions of dollars. Means of spread 
that affect the local places are as fol- 
lows: A dog running through a hog 
yard in which cholera hogs are kept 
will carry the germs on his feet. A 
neighbor, just to be neighborly, goes 
over to sympathize with a friend, and 
tramping around on the infected 
ground, carries the germs home on his 
boots, and thus his hogs become in- 
fected. 

in regard to treatment, the first 
measures should be a thorough clean- 
ing up of the house and the yards. The 
hog troughs should be kept thoroughly 
clean and disinfected. The task of 
fhoroughly disinfecting the hog houses, 
yards, troughs and fences is not an 
easy one, but the free use of a spray 
gun with 5 per cent carbolic acid will 
be effective. Bichloride of mercury, 
one dram to each gallon of water, or 
creolin, 1 per cent, will do much good 
in the way of disinfection. 

There is one method of producing 
Immunity against hog cholera, and 
that is by serum injection. For many 
years after the discovery of the bac- 
illus cholera suis, the manufacture of 
hog cholera serum was attempted by 
the United States department of agri- 
culture through its bureau of animal 
industry. 

This serum is made by hyperimmun- 
izing the hog by taking one that has 
passed through the disease and inject- 
ing this pig with a quantity of virus 
from a hog sick with cholera and in 
this way producing in this hog a great- 
er resistance, and as a result the se- 
rum from the blood of this hyperim- 
munizod hog will produce a greater re- 
sistance against the disease in another 
individual and make it proof against 
cholera. 

The bureau of animal industry has 
been conducting extensive experi- 
ments along this line in Iowa for sev- 
eral years and has perfected this 
method of treatment. They have asked 
the experiment stations of the various 
states to co-operate by establishing 
the hog cholera experiment depart- 
ments upon their farms so as to man- 
ufacture and furnish, at a minimum 
cost, all serum needed within the 
state. The serum, perhaps, costs a 
trifle more than those serums which 
can be produced by using the horse, as 
the hog does not furnish a great deal 
of blood. — B. F. Knaupp. 

o 

Quality of poultry meat is a matter 
of taste. Some prefer the greasy, oily, 
coarse, stringy meat of the Brahmas, 
Cochins, Orpingtons, etc., while oth- 
ers choose the finer textured, gamey 
meat of the Minorcas and Houdans. 
To be English, you know, one must 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure lor 

Curb, Splint, Sweenv, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

A* a HUMAN KEMEBT tor Rhen- 
matlaaa, Sprulna, Sore Tbrout, cm , it 

is invuluablo. 

Bvery t.nttlc of Caustic llalnnm sold )g 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price S> 1 .SO 
per bottle. Sold by druirtrists. or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimu- 
nials, etc. Address 

TEE LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, ClsreUnd, Ohio 



For Sale. 

DKKllv DHUBCT, pacer, blk. stallion, 
6 years old, 16 hands. Sired by Chun. 
Derby 2:20. First dam by Direct IMK, 

Second dam by Echo, sire of dam of 
Direct 2:05Vs. 

This is a handsome, well-made horse 
ami a fast natural pacer. Was worked 
a little as a three-year-old and stepped 
a mile In 2:19, last quarter in :31. 
Myrtha W., the only one of his foals 
ever trained, paced a half in 1:09 as a 
two-year-old. Can be seen at the 
Pleasanton race track at any time. 
For further particulars and price, 
write 

E. -S. IWKKER, 

Pleaaanton, Cat. 

TWO BROOD MARES FOR SALE 

Twenty- third, trotter (dam of the 
great Sterling MiKinney 2:0G% that 
sold last year for $86,000)' hy Director 
2:17, dam Nettle Nutwood (dam of 
Hillsdale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%, sec- 
ond dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903, third 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. Twenty- 
third is in foal to Alconda Jay. 

Alia Xoln 2:20. jiacer. by Altainont 
3600, dam Nola (dam of Phot-nix 
2:15%), by Nutwood 2:18%, second 
dam Belle Bvron (dam of Claus Almont 
2.26V4), by Bowman's Clark Chief, third 
dam Belle Hook by Almont 33. fourth 
dam by Bay Chief, fifth dam by Davy 
Crockett. 

Both the above mares are standard 
and registered, and are in fine order. 
I only offer these mares for sale be- 
cause my small farm is becoming over- 
stocked and 1 have their llllies to breed 
from. They will be sold very reason- 
able. For prices and further particu- 
lars, address 

C. II. WILLIAMS, 
Box 151. I'alo Alto. 



Two Standard Bred Stallions FOR SALE. 

One by (buries Derby, six years old, 

has paced miles in 2:12 V4. first-class 
individual, thoroughly broken, kind 
to drive. 

One by MeKlunev. weighs 1250 
pounds, high-class and handsome ani- 
mal in every respect. 

The dams of both of the above horses 
are registered for three generations 
back and are producers of speed. These 
two stallions are not only highly bred, 
but desirable animals in every respect. 
Will be sold cheap. For full particulars 
as to breeding, etc., address A. G. 
SI II PPEE, 247 W. Fremont St., Stock- 
ton, Cal. 

DICTATUS 2:17 TO LEASE. 

Sire of Funston 2:08%, DIctatress 
2:08%, Ama A. 2:10%, and nine more in 
the list, including those speedway 
champions Little Dick 2:11 % and Kitty 
D. 2:11%, both of which have beaten 
2:10. Dictatus is one of the best bred 
horses in America and for his oppor- 
tunities one of the greatest speed sires 
on the Coast. 

Is in good shape and ready for ser- 
vice. 

Apply to 
CLARENCE DAY, 

1462 Page Street, 

San Francisco. 



FOR SALE. 

The good matinee trotter Bob In- 
gersoll 2:14%, by Nutwood Wilkes, is 
offered for sale. He is in better shape 
than ever before, and is fat and all 
right. Also a black mare, three years 
old, weight 1075, 15.3 hands, and a nice 
pacer: sired by Alto Genoa 2:14%, dam 
by Alex Button; is gentle for a lady to 
drive. Also two other good, gentle, 
cily-broke driving horses. 

For particulars, apply to 

FRANK LIEGINGER. 
24 West Weber ave., Stockton. 

Good Ones for Sale. 

Standard and registered stallions by McKin- 
ney. brood mares, high-class roadsters and colts 
at very reasonable prices. I am closing out all 
my horses at private sale. Am offering some of 
the best bred and best individuals on the Coast. 
Write for particulars. Address. 

THOMAS SMITH, 

1021 Georgia St.. Vallejo. Cal. 

Percheron Stud Colts for Sale. 

The undersigned offers for sale two high-grade 
IVnhf ron-Norman draft yearling stud colts, a 
black and a bay. weighing respectively 1870 and 
1420 pounds. For prices and particulars address 

J. K. MONTGOMERY, 

Davis. Cal. 

THREE STALLIONS TO LEASE:. 

One son and two grandsons of McKin- 
ney 2:11%, all out of gilt-edge dams. 
These stallions are all 16 hands, of good 
color, and each has fine large coltd to 
show. They will be leased for the 
stud season of 1909 on liberal terms, but 
lessees will be required to give satis- 
factory security. For terms and pedi- 
grees, address 

A. B. RODMAN. Owner. 
Woodland, California. 



JACK FOR SALE!. 



Weighs 1.000 pounds, la well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Ia a 
prompt worker. Apply to 
S. B. WRIGHT, 

Bants Roaa, Cal. 



FAIRMONT 
Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The most superbly situated Ho- 
tel in the world — overlooking 
the Bay of San Francisco and 
City. 

Headquarters Army and Navy. 
The Social Center of City. 
Convenient to Business and 
Theater Sections. Reached by 
street cars from every direction. 
Only 5 minutes from ferry. 
Single Room with Bath, $2.50, 

$3, $3.50, $4, $5, $6, $7, $10. 
Suits with Bath, $10.00 upwards. 

Under MnniiKenient of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY ^ 

John C. K Irkpat rick. Manager. / 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS ' '-QU INT 
HERD. — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3-4. Registered cattle of 
beef and milking families for sale. 
Write us what you want. 
HOWARD CATTLE CO., San Mateo. 



GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-GLIDE 

FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 
Glide Grade — % French and H Spanish 
Merino. 

■ — Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams. — 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 297, Home Telephone, 
Sacramento. Cal. Dixon, Cal. 



W. HIGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office with E. Stewart & Co. 
297 Valencia St. S. F. 
Branch Office With 

Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

WANTED. 



A thoroughly experienced young man wishes a 
position as instructor at a riding academy, or 
with stock farm breaking and fitting polo ponies. 

Address. W. C. care of Breeder and Sportsman. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealera In PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland. Oregon. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— In— 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Deala-nlng. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco. 



STUD BOOKS FOR SALE. 

The first four volumes of Bruco's Ameri- 
can Stud Book, elegantly bound in 
Morocco, will be sold cheap for cash or 
exchanged for later volumes. 
Address this office, 

BREEDER and SPORTSMAN. 



{Important as 
Ithe Gun Itself 

is "3 in One" for oiling all 
the delicate parts. Makes i 
Itrigger, lock, -very action part workl 
I promptly, properly. Never hardens J 
lor gums, contains no acid. 
I 3 in One" removes the residue of ' 
■ burnt powder. 1 nd i spensible with 1 
Ismokeless powder. Positively prevents! 
I barrel from rusting inside or out. Cleans ' 
land polishes the stock. 

ifl sample bottle sent on request. 
;i-in -One Oil Co., 
102 NVw St New York, N. Y.| 



IFrec 



RACING! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

OAKLAND RAGE TRACK 



First Race at 1:40 p. m. 

Six or more races each week day, 
rnln or shine. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 20 
minutes until 1:40 P. M. No smoking 
in the last two cars, which are re- 
served for ladies and their escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Kvery facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

620 Octavia St., between Fulton and Grove, 
Phone Special 2074. San Franciaco, Cal 

WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

1165 Golden Gate Ave. 

Branch Hospital, corner W^bater and 
Chestnut Streets, 

SAN PRANCISCO, CAL. 

Itl BEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
BONESTELIi & CO., 
lis to 121 Fir*! St., >:ui Fmutaca, Cal. 

JOHN BARDUHN 

Successor to Kavanagh it Barduhn 

THE PALACE HOTEL TAILORS 

has removed to his permanent quarters 
No. 7 Sutter St., near Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 




ORBINE. 



will reduce inflamed, swollen Joints, 
Bruises, Soil Bunches. Cure Boils, Fis- 
tula or any unhealthy sore quickly: 

pleastmt to use; does not Dilator 
under bandage or remove the hair, 
and you can work the horse, $2 per 
bottle at dealers or delivered. 
Horse Book 7 D free. 
ABSORBINE, JR , for mankind, 
J $1.00 per bottlo. Keduces Varicose 
,^r.Vetns, Varicocele, Hydrocele, 
Goitre, Wens, Strains, Bruises, 
* — . - stops Pain and Inflammation 
W. F. YOUNG. PDF. 54 Monmouth St.. Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
ciaco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



„ a COPA/a* 



At 



CAPSULES 



O 

z 

w 



N 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THK BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



like the Minorcas; to be French the 
Houdan, and as we ape them in all 
other things why is not their judgment 
good in the quality of their favor- 
ite fowls? As to the quality of 
dressed meat to gross weight the Mi- 
norcas greatly excel and for quality of 
breast meat the long-bodied Minorcas 
can wipe up the earth with all compet- 
itors. Everybody will agree that as a 
meat proposition the Mediterran- 
eans are blooming failures. They are 
just out of the pigeon class and are 
scarcely under the wire as a poultry 
proposition. For a family of two a 
large one might suffice; three to five 
would be enough for an ordinary fam- 
ily and a dozen would be necessary 
when the preacher comes. 




-39% 

Registered Trade Mark 

SPAVIN CURE 




PONCA CITY, Okla., 12-4-08. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 
DEAR SIRS: — I have mailed you to- 
day a photograph of "Mayflower," my 
high-class show mare and trotter: first 
prize winner at International Horse 
Show, Kansas City. Thin made a 
start at Udall, Kans., 2:28 ! 4, with less 
than thirty days' work. 

When she came home from Kansas 
City she had a bad bowed tendon and I 
thought she would never be of any 
account for speed or showing and I 
bred her to Symboiler. I saw your ad- 
vertisement of "Save-The-Horse." I 
sent and got a bottle and began using 
it, and she improved so fast that I 
began working her in August, and com- 
menced racing her the middle of Sep- 
tember. Gave her the mark of 2 : 2 8 V4 . 
and during this time three-quarters of 
a bottle of 'Save-The-Horse" cured her 
sound and well. I have been asked by 
horsemen what I used and 1 told them. 
This mare is known by a great many 
horsemen in Kansas City and Okla- 
homa. I shall never be without "Save- 
The-Horse." Respectfully, 

WM. CRAVENS. 



"Save-the-Horse" permanently c\ires 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpln, 
splint, shoe boll, windpuff. Injured ten- 
dons, and all lameness, without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

$5 Per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as 
the best legal talent could make It. 
Send for copy and booklet. 

At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Formerly Troy N. Y. 
D. E. NEWELL, 
50 Bnyo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



Lice 



Sample FREE 



( Write for It.) 



IT WILL DO THE WORK AND 
YOU WILL WANT MORE, 

TOBACCO DUST 

A positive and recognized remedy fur 
poultry lice. The acknowledged sure 
ingredient for sheep dip. Guaranteed 
full strength, absolutely fresh, and 
as fxood as any in any market. 

Sure deatli to lice on 

HORSES, SHEEP, POULTRY, 

and all other kinds of live stock. 

Quotations f. o. 1>. San Francisco. All 
shipments may be returned within 10 
days and your money refunded if our 
Dust does not please you in every way. 
Samples mailed postpaid upon request. 

In 100 lb. lots, only 4'..,c. per lb. 

In 300 4 4c. " " 

In 500 " " " 3%c. " " 

Send a postal and get sample 
Tobacco Dust and our three com- 
plete new catalogues postpaid. 

It pays to buy by mail for cash. 
Our prices are the lowest Cut Rates 
and we prove it. 

The Owl Drug Co., 

Mail Order Dept., 611 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

Mention this paper. 

TOOMEY 

TWO-WHEELERS 

Are the Acknowledged Leaders. 





*t * * tit , 




The perfect cushion 
tire cart is undoubt- 
edly the best road 
cart ever placed on 
the market. 



We build Sulkies in nil sizes. Pneumatic Road 
and Track ( arts. High- Wheel Rood and Break* 
ing Carts. Send for latest catalogue. 

S. TOOMEY & CO., 

Canal Dover, Ohio, U. S. A. 



C. F. MOREL 



.Successor to 



J. O'KANE GO. 



Sheldon Building, 457 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

A Full Line of Highest Grade Harness. Turf and 
Leather Goods. 

F,verything in Horse Toggery. 

Agent for Wilcoxson's Perfection Liniment — $2 a bottle. Canipliell'H 
and all other well-known remedies. Local orders given prompt at- 
tention. Remember the new address. 



G. F, MOREL, Successor ,0 J - °' KANE co - 



Sheldon Building, 
457 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 



Makes Horses Sound— Keeps Them So 

In over 100,000 stables horses with bad legs and other troubles, such as Distem- 
per. Founder and Colic, are made sound and kept in prime shape with 
J_ * * ■■ _ via* • Corn spavin lameness, curb, splint. Sprain, 

I llttlO 6 |t ll"Yll* Hum-hex. Send for the prriofx. I«>nt experiment. 

M. Ulllv »3 a-iltA-s* c-e Tattle'' mul he sure. Axk alxo fur Tattle'l 
Worm Powder*, Condition Powder* and Hoof ointment. At dealer* or by oxprcxa. 
Valuable Veterinary Book Free. The beat guide fer lionteincn In all emergencies. 
Write for It today. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR CO.. 52 Beverly SI., Boston, Mass. 

MAOK&CO.,8an KranclKco, and V. W. DRAIN, I.ox Angelex; California Agent*. 





THE ARABIAN STALLIONS 



WILL 
STAND THE 

SEASON 



Introductory Offer to Breeders: $50 



Mares sent for and accommodated at foaling time. 

Write for particulars to 



EL RANCHO DE LAS ROSAS DESERT ARABIAN STUD 



The FOUNDATION BLOOD OF 
ALL GOOD HORSE STOCKS 



thoroughbred and standard bred 
in every case true- back to it. 
Even the Mustang ow es 1 1 i — en 
durance to the Arab strain. The 
Arab gives speed over long dis- 
tances, draft power, bottom, do- 
cility, intelligence, beauty of 
coat and conformation. The 
half-Arab is an Ideal combin- 
ation saddle and driving horse, 
suitable for the show-ring or HXI 
miles a day. 



ALMA, 
Santa Clara County, Cal. 



The Last Chance 

for California Breeders 

To Send Mares to ZQMBRO 2:11 

McKINNEY'S GREATEST SON AND GREATEST SIRE OF HIS AGE. 

Zombro will be taken East next Spring and will not be returned to California. 
He will make a fall and winter season at my place. No. 3727 Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. Zombro leads all trotting bred stallions as a sire of extreme speed 
this year, and his get have won more money than the get of any sire on this 
Coast. He has been the leading Pacific Coast sire for three years — 1906. 1907 and 
1908. Sixteen of his get have entered the 2:30 list this year, and while Bingen 
and Peter the Great each have one more in 2:30 list. Zombro leads all stallions 
as a sire of new 2:10 and 2:15 performers. He has four new ones in 2:10, three of 
them trotters, six new 2:15 performers, and seven new 2:20 performers. He now 
has eight in 2:10, 16 in 2:15 and 24 in 2:20, out of a total of 48 in the 2:30 list. 
Half of his standard performers have records below 2:20. He is the greatest speed 
sire of the age. Write me for terms. 

GEO. T. BECKERS, Owner. 
3727 S. Flgueroii St., i.om Angeles, Cal. 




KINNEY ROSE (trial) 2:13 j 



By McKinney 2:11',; dam Colden Rose by I a I rose; 
second dam I.ady Harper by Alaska; third dam by Algona; 
fourth dam by oddfellow, thoroughbred. 

Kinney Rose is a dark bay stallion, stands 15.8 bands 
and weighs 120(1 lbs. He is a splendid horse in every re. 
spect, handsome, intelligent, of good disposition, and in the 
opinion of many good judges is one of the fastest trotting 
sons of the great McKinney. 

There are but two colts in Kinney Rose's first crop ami 
they are coming two. Both of those colts can show a 2:40 
gait and that with limited handling. At a meeting held by 
the Woodland Driving; Club, Nov. 29th. Kinney H .a yearling 
by Kinney Rose, won the yearling stake taking the first and third beats in 2:50 
and 2:51 (the fastest heats trotted by a yearling in a race in 1908), being nosed 
out the second heat in 2:51 and this 7 weeks after being taken out of pasture. 
This colt 3 or 4 days before Thanksgiving was driven a mile by Det Bigelow on 
the Woodland track in 2:42. 

Season of '09 at the CHICO RACE TRACK. Terms: $35 for the Season. Return privilege 

The Norman Stallion Tom Terms: $15— $20 to insure 

8 years old, weighs 1,800 lbs. A first-class individual and very active horse. 

Yearlings by both of the above stallions will be at the track on exhibition. 

Address, CUIUS H ASH AGE:*, Manager, Chi Cnl. 

WM. HASHAGEN, Owner. 



Athasham 



Race Rec. 2:09^ 
Reg. No. 45026. 



A Game Race 
Horse in the Stud 




Bay Stallion, Stands 15.3, weighs 1.1 "><). Sired byAthadon (1) 
2:27 (sire of The Donna 2:01%, Athasham 2:(>!i' f. Sue 2:12. Lister, 
ine 2:13% and 8 others in 2:30); dam, the great brood inure Cora 

Wickersham (also dam of Nogi (31 2:17!-... (4 1 '2:10%. wi r of :!- 

year-old trotting division Breeders Futurity I'.HlTand < iccidentand 
Stanford Stakes of same year), by .lunio'J ^J 1 -j( si re of dams of <»co. 
G. 2:05%, etc.). Athasham bus a great future before him as a 
sire. He is bred right and made right, and has every uualitica- 
tion one can expect in a sire. He has been timed in 2 :<w'i :, i in a 
race, and his courage is unquestioned. 

He » ill make the Season of L909al Orchard Farm, Fresno, 

Cal., tore Fee of $25. Approved mares. 

For further particulars address this place. 

D. L. BACHANT, R. R. 1, Fresno, Cal. 



Milton Gear 2.ib : 



Sired bv Harry (fear 2.W2 (sire of Harry l.ogan 
2:12%. etc.) by Echo IIV2 (sire hi in 2::in li-t. II pro- 
ducing sons. 22 producing daughters), first dam 
Lulu N. by Dawn C7(I7. Hecord 2:18 ! %; 2nd dam 
Alice by Browns McClellan. 

Will make the SEASON OF 1909 at the 



Fee: $25 Hie Season. 

For further particulars 
apply to or address 



fJflUa] return 

prl i liege. 
J 



Fresno 

DEPOISTER, 



Fair Grounds 

Fresno, Cal. 



McKINNEY, 2:11%. 

Sir* of 20 in 2:10, 49 in 2:15, 66 in 2:20, 100 in 2:30. 
Sire of the sires of 94 in 2:30 (17 in 2:10) and 
Dams of 5 in 2:10. 

GREATEST PRODUCER AND TYPICAL SIRE THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. 

McKinney stallions are few and are worth from eight times his fee 
up. Book to others any time - to McKinney while you may. 
Only a few outside mares will be accepted. 

tS" wte Empire (Gitit, iFarma, new u ?ork. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



ABSURDITY OF MILK STANDARD. 



In a recent address upon milk stand- 
ards, General C. W. Wood, of Worces- 
ter, Mass., referring to the absurdity 
of punishing a man for selling pure 
milk because it falls below the legal 
butter fat content, said: 

I believe it would be just as con- 
sistent to talk about legislative enact- 
ment which would compel the product- 
ion of eggs that measured an inch and 
a half in circumference one way and 
two inches and a half the other; that 
contain one-half white, or 60 per cent 
of white, and 40 per cent of yolk. It 
would be just as consistent to say that 
potatoes should contain a certain 
amount of starch, and other chemical 
properties, and only a certain amount 
of water. It is just as consistent to 
legislate against the sale of any nat- 
ural product as to say that milk as na- 
ture has produced It should not be 
sold. Nevertheless, there is not a herd 



of cattle in Massachusetts, Ayrshire, 
Jersey, Holstein, or any other, that 
measures up to the requirements of 
the law to-day, and there is not herd 
of cattle in Massachusetts that pro- 
duces milk day by day but what some- 
times becomes amenable to the law. 
The standard should be that of purity, 
and purity alone. It is absurd to talk 
about imposing a penalty, and penal- 
izing a man for selling the pure pro- 
duct of a herd. 



FOB S \I.K. 

Bay paring gelding by Sidney Dil- 
lon, dam by Director. Has been a mile 
in 2:17. half in 1:03, and quarter in 29 
seconds. 

Brood mare by Antevolo, dam by 
Thad Stevens, ne\t dam by Whipple's 
Hambletonian. In foal to Chestnut 
Tom and nominated in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity Stake No. 9. For further in- 
formation, apply to or address 

T. I). SEXTON, 
iso i Mai-kei St., Oakland, CaL 




N HORSE 

f w 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Southeast Cor. 10th and Bryant Sts 



AT OUR NEW YEARS OPENING SALE ~™ 

200 Head of Horses 

will lie offered at our spacious and finely appointed Salesyards and 
Stables, located as above. 

100 of the famous double-square brand 

of horses from Nevada and 100 head all-purpose gentle broke horses, in- 
cluding draft horses, fast roadsters and farm workers. 

As usual we shall guarantee all horses to be as represented, and allow 
twenty-four hours for inspection ami delivery. 



100 Head Offered at 8 p. m. 



100 Head Offered at 1 p. m. 



All cars transfer to Eighth and Tenth Street lines which pass our 
salesyard. Consigners write for terms. 



WESTERN HORSE MARKET, 



E. Stewart 6 Co., Auctioneers 



glO DUE ON YEARLINGS 

Tuesday, February 2, '09 

Nothing more to pay before 1910. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8, $7,250 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1907 

Koals born 1008, to trot and pace at two and three years old, entries closed De- 
cember 2, 11*07. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1,750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomin- 
ators of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — 92 to nominate mare on December 2, 1907, when 
name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; 95 
May 1. 1908; 95 October 1, 1908; 910 on Yearlings February 2, 1909; 910 
on Two-Year-Olds February 1, 1910; 910 on Three-Year-Olds February 1. 
1911. 

STARTING PAYMEMS — 925 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; 935 to start in 
the Two-Year-Old Trot; 935 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; 950 to 
start in the Three- Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators mu»t deilgnate when maklne paymentn to Mart whether the home 
entered In a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colta that atart at two yearn old are not barred from starting again In the three- 
year-old dlvlalonx. 

A CHANCE FOR THOSE WHO FAILED TO ENTER. 
SUBSTITUTIONS— A feu „f the original nominators of Pacific Breeder! Futurity Stakes for foals 
of 1908 have advised us that, because of barrenness of the man- or death of the foal, they wish to dis- 
pose of their entries. If you own one or more whose dams you failed to name when entries closed, 
hy making the payments due any time on or before Feb. 'J. limy, which covers payments to Feb. 1. 
1910. the few substitutions to be disposed of will be awarded in the order in which remittances are 
received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich engagement. 

Address all communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEALD, President. F. W. KELLEV, Secretary. 

P. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cal. 
Office 368 Pacific Building, Corner Market and Fourth Streets. 



The Stallion Number 

—OF THE — 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, new. 
and articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 

As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many 
owners are not ready to say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Stallion Folders, 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know and wk WILL DO XBft kest. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures 
made from Photographs. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS $1.00 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

Pacific Bid};., Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



New Edition of John Splan's Book 



(4 



Life With the Trotter 



Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotter gives us a clear insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. ISreeher and Sportsman. P. O. Iirawer 447. San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific lildg.. Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of It on hand. It Improves 
and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P. 
Kertel, Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



> 



Saturday, January 16, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



EARTH'S WONDERS 



Yosemite— 

Open the year 'round. The quick way is Santa 
Fe to Merced; thence Yosemite Valley Railroad. 

Grand Canyon— 

The biggest thing in the world. El Tovar hotel 
on brink of Canyon. 
Under Fred Harvey management, one of the finest 
hotels in southwest. — Our folders tell. 
H. K . GREGORY, A. G. P. A., San Francisco. JOHN. J. BYRNE, A. P. T. M.. Los Angeles 




Campbell's 



EMOLLIC 
IODOFORM 




Gall Remedy 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, 
CRUPPER SORES and SADDLE GALLS 
there is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 
USUAL. 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN it has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning'. We placed it on the market 
relying wholly on its merits for success. 
The sales of 1906 were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Gall Remedy preceding that year. This 
increase was entirely due to its MER- 
ITS, and it is THE GALL REMEDY OF 
THE 20th CENTURY. 

It is quick and sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
which injure and often lay up race 
horses. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drag's 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1210. 



All Trainers Should Keep It in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00. 
(Read our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them 
to write any Jobber for it. 

JA8. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



No road too rough. Has 
cushion tires and carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding. and does away 
with all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with Pneumatic tires. 



W. J. KENNEY, 



Sales agent for 
California. 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 

53 1 Valencia Street, San Francisco 



AXWORTHY, 2:15^. s ZZl?o*Z" 

Sire of 59 in 2:30, including 

World's greatest trotting mare World's greatest three-year-old 

Hamburg Belle, 2:04% Gen. Watts (3), 2:06% 

If you wish to book - be quick while his book is sti'l open. 
For particulars, -mention this paper and address, 

ghp gmpirr (Hup jFarmg, Lexington, Ky. 



brittle Worth Saving?, 

-j^ "V ^ \ \ ' l, ,. fanJa s.ff I . T* f, . 1 I ■* ■ ■■■■ . 1 mt . . . I ■ I ■ 11 ttt\I\l\ \ 



Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good 
horse just because he "goes lame,'' "throws a 
" curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
Is nothing in the way of Spavins, Curbs, Splints, 
Windpuffs or Bunches which will not yield 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

*"T OINTMENT. 



l)r. K. 11. Davenport, n prominent phyfliHan of Sheridan . ind., 
writes: 1 have u>ed a number of remedies for the removnl of 
_ eui bf. PplintH, thickened tendorm and LI win i (rener/illy, hut for 
the last two years 1 hare not been without Qulnn's Ointment. I have tented it thoro- 
ughly ftt different times, and "ay without he*itaney tint it is the only reliable n-me- 
r of the kind 1 have ever tried. '» price SI .00 per bottle. Bold by all aroggub ' 

t by m*H. Writ* 
«"»'»ri toftlmonU 



ver tried. ' Price * i .uu per Dome. sum "y «■ ukkibw *<* 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall. N. Y. 




GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough.Golcher & Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phon. Temporary 1883. JJQ Market ^ ^ f mchQQ 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

Smokeless Shot Gun Powder 

THE OLD-TIME FAVORITE 

Hard Grain, 

Smokeless, 
Uniform, 



Clean Burning 



Stability Guaranteed 

Loaded in All First-Class Shells 



Ask Your Dealer for 



"New Schultze" 



A Powder for the Most Critical! 



MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS. 



E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 




Fxtrp r'nsp shouting , with even distribution 

and gi""i penetration, are essential qualities 

thnt n gun must possess for the very best RICCMI 
nt the traps. 

[thwcg linns have ■ world-wide reputation for 

their gjungrfor Bhootlng qualities. 

" Hob" Edwards, the veteran barrel borer, who 

first bored Ithaca 'inns in |ss::, is still nt it — his 

experience at your command. 
Even Ithaca Gun Is g narantet 



'1 in every pn rt 



hnmmerlcss guns arc f 1 1 1 • - » 1 with thr 



bolts aiul 



^H_n^m^n|mes. which are ranml^i^vT 

against breakage i weakness or lost tension. 

Bend for Art f'nti'log and special prices; is 
grades $17.75 net to $:inn.00 list. 

Pacific Const Branch — Phil, It. Ttikenrt Co., 
717 Market St.. Pan Krnncisco. 

ITHACA GUN COM PAW 

CD r P ft is 
ITHACA, N. "Y. 



Distemper Always Dangerous. 

Valuable horses fall easy victims to this often fatal dls- 
e&se. When It once breaks out It spares none. To prevent its 
spread and cure the sick, put a tcaspoonful of CRAFT'S DIS- 
TKMI'KK (TRIO in the feed or on the tongue once a day and 
your trouble will soon end. C5et It from your druggist or we 
will send It prepaid. 50 cents and $1.00 a bottle. I). K. NKWIilJ, 
5fi Havo Vista avenue. (Oakland. Cal.. Pacific Coast Agent. 




It 



T H ■ BRI1DER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1909. 



Fine 

Harness... 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



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Remington . 



AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



NO SLIDE TO WORK 

Willi the left hand. Kight hand pulls trigger. Recoil electa, cooks and 
reloads. Solid breech protection against "blow hacks." Safety just before 
trigger finger proven t« Accidental discharge. Full line of double guns if 
you prefer. 

The Ideal Duck Gun. List Price $40 and Upwards. 

Remington Arms Company 

llion, New York. Agency, 313 Broadway, New York. 



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WINCHESTER 

.22 CALIBER REPEATING RIELE 

The Model 1906 Handling Three Cartridges 

This Winchester repeater, which is now made to handle either .22 
Short, .22 Long or .22 Long Rifle Rim Fire Cartridges, is the biggest 
value in a rifle ever offered. It is made with the same skill and care 
as Winchester rifles of larger caliber, which means that it is accurate, 
reliable and well finished. It takes down easily and packs in a 
small compass, making it a handy adjunct to any sportsman's 
kit. The list price is only $10.50 and it retails for less. 

Winchester Guns and Ammunition — the Red W Brand — are sold everywhere. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



FOR FIELD and TRAP SHOOTING 
Hold All the Best Records 

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CARRIED BY THE BEST TRADE 

SMELTING & LEAD CO., 

San Francisco. 




a 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



$5,000 



REOPENED 



GUARANTEED. 



$ 5,000 



The State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 1 



GUARANTEED. 



Foals of Mares Covered in 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$2900 for Trotting Foals.- 



$2100 for Pacing Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento Cal 

Entries to close February 1, '09. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS : 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

Mare was bred. 

FORT WO- YEAR -OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1911 



TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS 
TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS 



$800 
500 



$IOO to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR-THREE-YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at theCalifornia State Fair, 1912 

THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS . . $2000 
THREE-YEAR-OLD PACERS . . . . I500 



HN I'HkM K VM) I'.Vl HK\TS—}; to nominate mare on February 1, 1909, when name, color, description of marc ami stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 
l'Ki'J- $. r > December 1, 1909; $10 on Yearlings, February I, 1910; $10 on Two-Year-Olds, February I, 1911; $10 on Three-Year-Olds. February 1, 1912. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $25 to start In the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start 
in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators mutt designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered Is a Trotter or Pacer. 

( oil* Hint start nt two years old are not barred from starting again in the three-year-old divisions. 

For Entry Blanks aud further particulars, address the Secretary. 

CONDITIONS : 

The races for Two-Year-Olds will be mile heats, 2-ln-3, and for Three-Year-Olds, 3-in-5. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three-Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February I, 1!M0, her nominator may sell or tranafer hla 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; bnt there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid in or contracted for. lu entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred In 1908. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5,000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions 

Right reserved to declare oft or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 26, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Write for Entry Blanks to 



B. F. RUSH, 

President. 



J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 



Owners of Live Stock in California 
Should Insure in Their Own Associatinn, 

The California Mutual Live 
Stock Insurance Association 



Because 

It is the only institution of the kind organized under the laws of 
California with the home office in this State 

We insure live stock against death from disease, fire, lightning, 
tornado, cyclones and every casualty; also through accident which may 
necessitate the death of any animal. 

Losses are paid promptly without discount and without unnecessary 
delay. 

We have a guaranty deposit under the control of the State Treasurer 
for the protection of our members and poiicy holders. 

There is $100 of values lost to farmers by death of stock, by disease 
and accident, where $1 is lost by fire. 

We have no dividends or profits paid to idle office holders. 

The business of the Association is conducted as economically as is 
e. insistent with good management, and the earnings are divided among 
the policy holders. 

This is an age of Mutual Insurance, and it is true the cheapest and 
strongest companies in the United States to-day are composed of and 
managed by the policy holders, who are farmers and stockmen, as has 
been demonstrated in the East. 

The directors and officers are elected annually by the policy holders. 

WHY PAY LARGE PREMIUMS FOR PROFIT TO EASTERN 
COMPANIES WHEN YOU CAN CO-OPERATE WITH YOUR FELLOW 
FARMER AND STOCKMAN AND SECURE YOUR INSURANCE AT 

COST? 

We are receiving daily mar.y testimonials 

from policy holders whose claims have been and arc being promptly and 

satisfactorily settled. 

References : 

Oakland Bank of Savings, Oakland. Cal.; National Bank of California, 
Lob Angeles. Cal.; Secretary Savings Bank. Los Angeles, Cal., or any 
reliable bank 111 the Stale. 

M. L. WRIGHT, Pres. I. A. WRIGHT, Secy. 

EioUB Oki m k: 270-^71-272 Bacon Building, 12th .St. and Broadway, 
' lakland 3990, OAKLAND, Cal. 

Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 

Breeder and Sportsman 



S10 DUE ON YEARLINGS 

Tuesday, February 2, '09 

Nothing more to pay before 1910. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8, $7,250 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1907 

Foals bom 1008, to trot and pace at two and three years old, entries closet! De- 
cember 2, liK)7. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1,750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomin- 
ators of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — 92 to nominate mare on December 2, 1907, when 
name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; 95 
May U 190S; 95 October 1, 1908; 910 on Yearlings February 2, 1909; 910 
on Two-Year-Olds February 1, 1910; 910 on Three-Year-Olds February 1. 
1911. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — 925 to start In the Two-Year-Old Pace; 935 to start in 
the Two-Year-Old Trot; 935 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; 950 to 
start in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 
Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse 

entered Is n Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three- 
year-old divisions. 

A CHANCE FOR THOSE WHO FAILED TO ENTER. 
SUBSTITUTIONS— A few of the original nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for foals 
of 1908 have advised us tlmt. because of barrenness of the mare or death of t lie foal, they wish to dis- 
pose of their entries. If you own one or more whose dams you failed to name when entries closed, 
by making the payments due any time on or before Keb. 2, 1909, which covers payments to Feb. 1. 
1V10, the few substitutions to be disposed of wiil l>e awarded in the order in which remittances are 
received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich engagement. 

Address all communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEALD, President. P. W. KELLEV, Secretary. 

P. O. Drawer 447, San Frnnclsco, Cal. 
Office 300 Pacific Building, Corner Market and Fourth Streets. 




TALLION OWNER 

If In need of anything In the line of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed, Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock ami made, from photos, 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, Pregnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO, 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



a 



THE WEEKLY 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLET, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms — One Tear $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months %1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



IN A COMMUNICATION which appears on an- 
other page of this issue of the Breeder and Sports- 
man, Mr. Frank H. Burke, proprietor of the La Siesta 
Stock Farm, San Jose, and who for many years past 
has ably filled the position of Director of the Cali- 
fornia State Board of Agriculture as well as Director 
of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Asso- 
ciation, makes several apropos suggestions in regard 
to the formation of a California circuit of harness 
racing for 1909. Mr. Burke has been a patron of 
harness racing for many years and is thoroughly 
familiar with the sport both as an owner and as a 
member of associations that give meetings, conse- 
quently what he writes is from the standpoint of one 
"who knows whereof he speaks." Mr. Burke makes 
the point in his communication that the first and 
most necessary step to take is for the associations to 
get together as soon as possible to agree upon dates 
and formulate programs. The editor of this journal 
believes that the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers' Association is the proper body to call such a 
convention, and that it should be called to meet in 
San Francisco at an early date. This convention 
should consist of delegates from every association in 
California that can give a meeting of circuit caliber, 
and the delegates should come to the convention with 
power to select dates and issue a program of stakes 
and purses. From towns having good mile tracks 
but where there is no regular organized body that can 
send delegates, there should come representative 
citizens who favor and will be ready to assist in 
giving a meeting. The writer suggests that a con- 
vention composed of delegates from San Diego, San 
Bernardino, Los Angeles, Salinas, Pleasanton, Santa 
Rosa, Woodland, Marysville, Chico, Fresno, Hanford, 
Tulare and Bakersfield be called to meet in this city 
at an early date in February; that such convention 
be called by the President of the Pacific Coast Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders' Association; that the California 
State Board of Agriculture be invited to send repre- 
sentatives to this convention; and that owners and 
trainers of harness horses be also invited to attend. 
The organization of a circuit is of vital importance 
to the breeding and training interests of California. 
For several years past there has not been one-half 
as many meetings each year as there should be, and 
the earning capacity of trotters and pacers has been 
reduced accordingly. The time has come when Cali- 
fornia must organize a circuit or permit the sport of 
harness racing to deteriorate into an unorganized 
state or condition in which but two or three meet- 
ings of class will be given in the State each year, 
and all the best and fastest horses sent East or sold 
for low prices because their owners cannot afford or 
do not care to race them that far from home. There 
are several other suggestions in Mr. Burke's com- 
munication that will properly come within the scope 
of questions to be discussed at a convention, but the 
most important thing is to secure the convention 
that they may there be taken up and disposed of. 
We therefore suggest to the Board of Directors of the 
P. C. T. H. B. A. that they meet as soon as possible 
and call a convention to meet early in February 
There is no time to lose, as every program should be 
issued by March 1st at the latest. 

o 

KID WILKES, the sensational matinee trotter of 
San Bernardino, whose second heat of a winning race 
was trotted last Christmas day in 2:10%, is the 
subject of an interesting article printed on page 5 
of this issue of the Breeder and Sportsman, written 
by the horse's owner, Mr. W. L. Scott, of Riverside. 
Mr. Scott gives the breeding of Kid Wilkes, and 
says he is a "cousin" to Velox 2:09*4. whose breed- 



ing was given in this journal January 9th by Mr. 
Curtis, who claims to have bred Velox's dam. Now 
Mr. Curtis and Mr. Scott do not agree as to this 
breeding. In Mr. Curtis' letter printed January 9th, 
he stated that the dam of Velox was Anne Boleyn 
by thoroughbred Balboa, second dam Gray Annie 
by Romera, 2: 19%, third dam Little Sally by a son 
of Williamson's Belmont, fourth dam Mad Sally by 
Rifleman. Mr. Curtis also" stated that he sold Gray 
Annie with a sorrel filly at her side, that was a 
full sister to Anne Boleyn, to Hancock Johnson, who 
sold the filly to a man named Kirkpatrick, who in 
turn sold her to a Mr. Stewart of Riverside, and 
that this filly is the dam of Kid Wilkes. Now comes 
Mr. Scott, owner of Kid Wilkes, and gives this horse's 
dam as Romeria by Balboa, second dam by Ro- 
mero 2:19%, third dam Sally by Crichton, sire of the 
dam of Arrow 2: 13%, etc. This horse Crichton is 
given in the Year Books as by imported Glencoe. 
We hope the owners of Velox and Kid Wilkes will 
try and straighten this breeding out if possible as 
both horses promise to be very prominent on the 
turf this year and if they are out of full sisters, as 
all parties seem to agree, the pedigrees of these 
"full sisters'" should be identical. Otherwise, in 
the language of Lord Dundreary, it will be" most em- 
barrassing to everybody, don't you know." 

THE ANNUAL HORSE SALE at Pleasanton this 
year will be the biggest one ever held in California, 
Fred H. Chase & Company fully expecting to sell 
two hundred horses. As will be seen by reference 
to our advertising columns, some of the choicest bred 
trotters and pacers in California have already been 
consigned to the sale, although this is the first public 
announcement that has been made of the dates. 
Buyers, and good ones too, have been writing to 
know when the sale would be held, that they might 
arrange their affairs so as to be present, so Mr. 
Chase has fixed the dates for March 25, 26 and 27, and 
is now ready to book consignments. The catalogue 
is to be the most complete ever gotten out for a 
sale in this State and as it will be issued March 
1st, every owner should fill out the blanks sent him 
with as full a pedigree as he can give and send it to 
Mr. Chase as soon as possible. Pleasanton will be a 
lively town during the week of the sale, but there 
will be hotel accommodations for all, with extra 
good things to eat. The horses that are in training 
will all be shown in harness the day before the sale 
and some fast time for quarters and halves may be 
expected. There has never been a time when so 
many Eastern buyers have signified their intention 
of being in California at the time this sale is to be 
held, and this alone will be an inducement to send 
good horses to the auction block as four or five good 
buyers will mean good prices for the horses they 
want. Now that the first announcement of this sale 
is made, it only remains for owners who want to sell 
to correspond with Fred H. Chase & Company, 478 
Valencia street, San Francisco, and book their stock. 
Extensive advertising is to be done and those who 
consign early will get the greatest benefit from it. 

IT IS TO BE HOPED that the Directors of the 
California State Agricultural Society will not make 
the mistake again this year of opening the fair 
on Saturday and trying to string a six day program 
out to seven. This year the pavilion exhibit is for 
the first time to be held within Agricultural Park 
and there is every prospect that a modern fair, 
held on up-to-date lines, will prove a big success 
this year, bigger than ever in the history of the 
Association. If the fair is confined to one week, open- 
ing on Monday and closing the following Saturday, 
the crowds will attend, and there can be a good 
day every day. We hope the idea of opening the 
fair on September 4th, which falls on Saturday and 
which has already been suggested, will not. be adopted 
by the State Board when it finally fixes its dates. 
o 

ROBERT H. COSGROVE, Secretary of the Spo- 
kane, Washington, Inter-State Fair, dropped in on 
us this week for a short visit. Mr. Cosgrove has 
been touring the Coast in the interests of his As- 
sociation which gives one of the greatest fairs held 
west of the Mississippi river. The half mile track 
of the Association, which has heretofore been a 
rather slow and heavy track, has been covered with 
six inches of clay since the last fair, and Mr. Cos- 
grove thinks it will prove a very safe and fast track 
for both harness and running racing. There is no 
more popular Secretary in the West than Mr. Cos- 
grove and he certainly knows how to run a big fair 
and make it popular with the public and exhibitors 
alike. 



STRONG COMBINATION OF SALESMEN. 



The growth of the business of the Chicago Horse 
Sale Company, together with the fact that the former 
secretary, W. W. Van Sant, has become largely 
interested in real estate, requiring his personal at- 
tention, a reorganization of the company has been 
made, that ought to make it one of the strongest of 
its kind ever effected. Palmer L. Clark, as before, 
will be the active manager and president; W. W. 
Van Sant, vice-president, retaining an interest, but 
will not take an active part in the affairs of the 
company. Frank P. Kenney, formerly identified with 
the Tranter-Kenney Company, and latterly with the 
Indianapolis Sales Company, will be secretary of the 
organization, while Magnus Flaws of Chicago has 
been selected as treasurer. 

Palmer L. Clark has gained the enviable distinction 
of achieving the great success that has attended 
the efforts of the Chicago Horse Sale Company, 
brought about by that gentlemanly courtesy, with 
a genius for advertising and a passion, if one may 
use the term, of absolute fairness, that is so essen- 
tial in the character of a man who occupies the un- 
enviable position of standing right between the 
buyer and the seller. If he has any pride, it is in the 
fact that in the nine years that the Chicago Horse 
Sales Company has been in existence, a great many 
of the consignors who patronized his first sale are 
still doing business with him on the same basis. 

Frank P. Kenney, the new secretary of the com- 
pany is admirably fitted for the position through his 
long connection with the sale business, both in Ken- 
tucky and Indiana as well as in the East, and has 
an extensive and favorable acquaintance with horse- 
men that ought to bring strength to the Company. 
He leaves the Indinaapolis Sales Company, with the 
endorsement of his associates and with the wish that 
their former patrons take advantage of his services 
in the Chicago market. 

Magnus Flaws, the treasurer, is well known in 
the West as a starter and presiding judge, and as 
senior member of the firm that bears his name, 
which gets out nearly all the sale and stock farm cat- 
alogues as well as stallion cards for breeders all 
over the country. Like Secretary Kenney, he is an 
expert in speed statistics. 

The offices of the Company will remain as before 
at the Transit House, Union Stock Yards, but the 
treasurer will retain his down town office, at 358 
Dearborn street, directly across from the Trotting 
Register office, so as to accommodate those who 
would be benefitted by this convenience. 

What Jimmy Tranter Says. 

The opinion of the leading sales manager of the 
East, as to the Western market, to say the least ougnt 
not to be prejudiced in favor of the West. The fol- 
lowing is from the New York Telegraph of December 
27: 

"E. J. Tranter, manager of Fasig-Tipton's trotting- 
horse sales department, has just returned from an 
extended Western trip and brings with him, as the 
result of his observations, cheerful news about the 
prospects of the horse market and the racing sport 
of the new year. 

"His chief object was to attend the big sale at the 
Stock Yards under the management of the Chicago 
Horse Sale Company, and what he saw during the 
five days' sale, has fully convinced him that the 
demand for trotters was never greater than this 
winter. He calls the Chicago sale a corking good 
one from every standpoint, and believes that nearly 
all the consignments brought higher prices, consid- 
ering quality, breeding and merit, than they would 
have done last winter, or at any thime during the 
past five years. 

" 'Horsemen and trainers everywhere,' said Mr. 
Tranter yesterday, complain of the scarcity of good 
horses, but the fact of the matter is that good race 
prospects and high class breeding stock are just 
as plentiful as ever, but few are on the market at 
any price.' 

" 'The Chicago sale was a complete surprise to 
me, because of its great success in every respect. 
The atendance was very large and the actual buy 
ers were in the majority every day, ready to se 
cure one or more of their choices if they possibly 
could. Material available for racing was pushed up 
to higher figures than quality warranted, while young 
stock found ready buyers.' " 

The next Chicago sale will commence Monday, 
February 22, (Washington's birthday), and will con- 
tinue six days with the best lot of horses ever of- 
fered for auction in the West. 

Selling horses at auction has now assumed the 
relative position of all other first-class marketable 
commodities. New York and Chicago have come to 
be regarded as the clearing house headquarters of 
all horses of value. The leading stock farms con- 
sign annually the best of their product, while the 
mediocre ones are vended at home. The traininu 
stables have no fear of sending their best for pub- 
lic valuation, while the inferior ones are sold prl 
vately. Proof of this is best illustrated in the con- 
signments already made to the Chicago February 
sale, which includes the youiiK prospects from some 
of the leading farms in the country, as well as a great 
lot of ready to race material and high class breeding 
stock. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



J. I). S., Woodland. — Under the present rules your 
mare cannot be registered unless two of her pro- 
duce take trotting records of 2:30 or better. Her 
dam is not registered and cannot be as she is by a 
stallion that is not registered. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



CONVENTION PROPOSED. 



Mr. Frank H. Burke, of La Siesta Farm Offers Some 
Excellent Suggestions. 



Editor Breeder and Sportsman. 

Dear Sir: The members of the Eastern Grand 
Circuit have already signed up their dates. It is 
certainly time for the Pacific Coast to get into line. 
The California State Fair is a member of the North- 
western Circuit and will probably await Seattle dates 
as a courtesy to the Alaska-Yukon Exposition and a 
desire to assist California horsemen in obtaining a 
longer season of racing with the least mileage. At 
present, all indications point to Sacramento taking 
as its first date September 4th. 

The matter is now up to the California Associa- 
tions to quickly make up their minds about giving 
meetings, and if so, to decide on dates. The south- 
ern portion of the State, especially Los Angeles, 
I am informed, is desirous of racing after the State 
Fair. This is unfortunate as (if this is the case) 
it would conflict with the liberal purses that will be 
offered by the Oregon tracks, besides giving smaller 
fields, after allowing the usual percentage for the 
lame ducks, the disgruntled and the large number 
that fail to make the final payments when they 
find that their nominations have that terrible dis- 
ease, the "Slows." 

Two years ago through the good and hard work 
of the Breeder and Sportsman, a convention of 
track owners, breeders and delegates from the State 
Agricultural Society, Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association and others, met at Pleasanton. 
The work outlined and started by that enthusiastic 
body of horsemen changed a very gloomy outlook 
to a circuit of double the number of successful meet- 
ings that we had any right to expect from the prev- 
ious canvasses by me of the different trotting Asso- 
ciations from San Francisco to Los Angeles. A 
similar conclave should be agitated for a date early 
in February, if possible. There are many other 
matters that should be brought up that we can touch 
upon at that "joy-fesf of the admirers of the har- 
ness horse. 

All tracks cannot give the same sized purses nor 
the same number, but they can adopt the same gen- 
eral classes and not compel owners who race from 
one meeting to another until they are five or six 
hundred miles from home, to lay over a portion of 
their stable for several meetings because the class 
they had contended in has been changed several 
notches to suit the vagaries of new men at the 
wheel, or, as is thought by suspicious trainers, to 
make a soft place for horses of the district. Classes 
that are made by the Associations that have never 
missed giving a meeting in years, kept the game 
going and provided fair purses, and kept the wolf 
from the door, should surely be good enough for those 
who give occasional meetings, or the others who are 
just entering the circuit. 

The date for entering in the early closing stakes 
should be later than it has been, if those who risk 
the money can possibly see their way clear to do 
so without loss. This certainly would reduce the 
percentage of suspensions that has driven many an 
over-enthusiastic owner out of the sport, as it would 
give more time to assay the brick before putting up 
the coin. The Associations may cry in chorus that 
it would reduce the number of entries, and possibly 
it would; but it would also reduce the number of bad 
debts, and again there is also a chance of getting 
entries from others that were not going to nominate 
but in the additional month, or longer time to try 
out, found that they have something much better 
than an empty stall. The other class which has 
rushed in "where angels fear to tread" will have 
then found out that its "Phenom" was only threat- 
ened with speed, snatch another one out of the field 
and start in again, and after finding the right page 
and chapter in its excuse book, be a "boomer" of the 
gentlemen's sport, instead of a suspended person and 
a mustard plaster to every one in the game. 

Another matter is the question of changing the 
classes every fortnight to eliminate the unbeatable 
ones that have already won their share, but allow- 
ing them to go in the faster classes in which they 
may be eligible. The convention might even go fur- 
ther and after the main objects of the meeting were 
settled; the question of letting horses that were 
started three times in the fast class that their for- 
mer record had forced them into without getting 
money, might be allowed for their entrance money 
already paid in, to start in the next slower class. 
But this is merely to bring out the ideas of owners 
and breeders at that conclave. 

Certainly something must be done for that large 
contingent of out-classed horses, either by handicap- 
ping or by allowing them a rebate on their entrance 
further down the line. 

The question, if brought up, may lead to other 
solutions of the problem. It is very important as 
the day of special races made up the night before, 
and the purse divided before it is trotted for has 
gone, never to return, though its ghost still trots on 
the half-mile tracks. 

The question of starter is also a matter for all 
Associations to consider, not that they should bind 
themselves to all employ the same man, or one of 
several agreed-on men, but that they pledge them- 
elves to employ only a man whose "batting aver- 
age" is high. By that I mean that his starts shall 
be tabulated on a score card, as a base ball enthusiast 
would keep tab on the work of a pitcher. Use 
common sense in the score card. When a starter 
lets his horses off going strong and flat-footed, even if 
they are strung out for forty yards, give him credit 
for it and Sunday school measure at that, but when 



with a small field of good actors he tries any number 
o£ times to get all heads on the line and make a 
spetacular start for a few hand-claps from people 
who have never paid for a sack of oats for any horse 
in the race, he is sacrificing twenty thousand dol- 
lars worth of horseflesh to let some stub-and-twist 
go away at the top of his speed, while the perfect 
alignment requires faster horses to be nearly pulled 
double to avoid fines. 

The men who race are, unfortunately, the ones 
who pay for the most of the purses, and as they 
furnish the entertainment, should be shown every 
consideration that does not cause the interest of the 
man who pays at the gate to wane; we must look out 
carefully for the interest of the half-dollar-man. 
He pays for the band, fixing the track, policing the 
ground, janitor and ice water for the judges. Don't 
have many scores or he won't come back again and 
the directors will have to go down in their pockets 
and then — next season — no meeting. 

Now, what I want discussed is whether we cannot 
all have an agreement with the starter that, if in 
the opinion of the judges, or the directors if you 
choose, his score card on recall is bad or there are 
other points against him, that they can and will dis- 
pense with his services. Substitute a swipe as a 
starter, none of them can do worse, and if they do, 
there are plenty more swipes. Have members of your 
Association who have started before, take out start- 
er's licenses and prepare for emergencies. It won't 
be necessary if there is a thorough understanding 
with the man with the loud voice that you want to 
keep things humming and send the horses to your 
neighbor's fair sound and not frayed to a frazzle. 

I know that the driver who gets off last will turn 
around in his sulky and look daggers (and think 
worse) at the judges, in the meantime allowing his 
horse to break, but he may not be a bad last, and 
he will not next heat (if he has saved his distance), 
for his system will then be thoroughly impregnated 
and saturated with the brilliant idea that no one 
or two horses can spoil a start and make an entire 
field trot worse than two hard heats before the word 
is given. With an assurance of few scores, owners 
would enter seasoned campaigners twice a week. It 
is not the races, it is the scoring that tucks up 
the horses and makes them sour and stale. 

Drivers must not forget to remember "The boys 
in the gallery usually pay their salary." — No paying 
grandstand, no wages, and the clock stops. 

FRANK H. BURKE, 
o 

ZOMBRO 2:11 GOES EAST APRIL 1ST. 



The greatest sire in California, Zombro 2:11, sire 
of five trotters in the 2:10 list, will be shipped from 
Los Angeles to Paoli, Penn., on April 1st. Paoli is 
fifteen miles from Philadelphia, and Mr. A. B. Cox, a 
wealthy citizen of that place, who is now in Cali- 
fornia, has already booked 15 highly bred mares to 
the son of McKinney. Among the mares that Mr. 
Cox will send to Zombro's court this year are the 
great Sunol 2:08% by Electioneer, that is now in 
foal to the dead stallion Todd 2:14%; Tuna 2:08% by 
James Madison, the mare that won the Occident and 
Stanford stakes as a three-year-old and was cam- 
paigned on the Grand Circuit later by Jack Curry, 
Electric Maiden 2:12, Imogene 2:11%, Ettie L. 2:12%. 
American Bell (3) 2:12%, Grace A. 2:12% over half 
mile track, the old California favorite She 2:12%. 
Sally Lunn 2:18%, and others. This will be the great- 
est lot of record mares that Zombro ever had in one 
season, and there is no doubt whatever but the lead- 
ing breeders of the East will send some of their very 
best mares to be bred to McKinney's greatest son. 
The removal of Zombro to Pennsylvania is a great 
loss to California, but as he does not go till April 
1st, those who have mares that can be bred before 
that date should not let the opportunity pass of get- 
ting a colt by him. Zombro's fee in Pennsylvania 
will be $100 the mare, which is the cheapest fee in 
America, considering the horse. 

o 

ZOLOCK 2:05i/ 4 AT LOS ANGELES. 



The great speed sire Zolock 2:05%, one of the best 
bred stallions in America and a horse that is des- 
tined to be one of the leading 2:10 sires of the world, 
will be in the stud this year at Agricultural Park, 
Los Angeles. Every reader of the Breeder and Sports- 
man knows all about Zolock. They know what a 
fast and game race horse he was, that his record is a 
race record, that his 2:10 list, comprising Sherlock 
Holmes 2:06, Bystander 2:07%, Delilah 2:07%, 
Josephine (4) 2:07%, R. Ambush 2:09%, and 
Velox 2:09%, is made up of good race horses who 
all got their records in actual races, and that his 
breeding is of the choicest, inasmuch as he is by Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%. the greatest speed sire in the world, 
and his dam is a developed great broodmare with 
a record of 2:11%. Zolock is standard and registered 
and one of the most uniform sires of speed that ever 
lived. His service fee this year will be $75 for the 
season, with the usual return privilege. Address N. 
S. Young. University Station, Los Angeles, for fur- 
ther particulars. 

o 

Daughters of Simmons, the great son of George 
Wilkes, have produced Hamburg Belle 2:04%, Brenda 
Yorke 2:04%, Fereno 2:05%, Bonnie Direct 2:05%, 
Hal C, 2:05%, Bonnie Steinway 2:06%, and Prince 
Arundel 2:09%. 



Minor Heir got the start of The Eel by being sold 
first thing in the year but the Canadian comes back 
by winning the first race of the year. 



SUGGESTION FOR A CIRCUIT. 



The following suggestion is offered for a California 
Circuit of harness meetings, by which racing can 
begin in July and extend to November, and on which 
the California horses can be raced at the principal 
Oregon meetings without interfering with their en- 
gagements at home. It will be seen that the days 
and dates selected for each meeting will give plenty 
of time for shipping from one point to another. It 
is proposed to start the circuit in Southern Calfornia 
and work north as follows: 

San Bernardino, four days July 21 — 24 

San Diego, four days July 26 — 31 

Los Angeles, six days Aug. 2 — 7 

Salinas, four days Aug. 11 — 14 

Pleasanton, four days Aug. 18 — 21 

Santa Rosa, four days Aug. 25 — 28 

Woodland, four days Sept. 1 — 4 

Sacramento, six days Sept. 6 — 11 

Chico, four days Sept. 13 — 16 

(Two weeks interval for Salem and Portland 
Meetings.) 

Fresno, four days Oct. 6 — 9 

Hanford, four days Oct. 13 — 16 

Tulare, four days Oct. 20—23 

Bakersfield, four days Oct. 27 — 30 

A circuit arranged as above would provide thir- 
teen weeks of racing in California, with an interval 
of seventeen days between the closing of the meet- 
ing at Chico and the opening of the San Joaquin 
Valley circuit at Fresno. During this interval Cal- 
ifornia horses that are entered at the Salem and 
Portland, Oregon, meetings could be taken there to 
race and return to California in time to start at 
Fresno. If the managers of the tracks at the above 
thirteen California towns would get together within 
the next few weeks, organize a circuit, and agree 
on programs and dates of closing there is no doubt 
whatever but they could secure nearly all the best 
stables in California to race through the circuit. By 
re-classifying the horses in a majority of the classes 
every two weeks good fields would be had in nearly 
every event. There should be a few large early 
closing stakes, to close about June 1st, but the larger 
part of the program should be purse races to close 
not earlier than two weeks before each meeting. 

One of the most important things for an Association 
to look out for is to give just as much money for 
purses as it can afford, but to be careful and not 
give more. One of the most discouraging things 
for a director who has worked hard all week to 
make the meeting a success, is to be compelled to go 
down into his pocket after it is all over to assist 
in making up a deficit. "Cut your garments accord- 
ing to your cloth," is a pretty good motto for har- 
ness racing associations to follow. 

If the thirteen places named above could give an 
average of $6,000 each in stakes and purses — not an 
extravagant amount — this would mean a total of 
$78,000 for harness horses to race for in California 
next summer which would look quite tempting at the 
head of an official announcement. 

H. 

o 

DEATH OF PRINCE WARWICK. 



California and Oregon breeders will remember that 
the Oregon bred stallion Prince Warwick was sold 
in 1892 when he was eight years old for export to 
Austria. The sale was made, we believe by the late 
Orrin Hickok, and $10,000 was the sum given out 
as the price paid for him. Prince Warwick was a 
handsome bay horse and was sired by Alcona 730, a 
Kentucky bred stallion, owned by the late Silas Skin- 
ner and sold by him to the late Fred Loeber, who 
then resided at Vineland in Napa county. The death 
of Prince Warwick is announced as having occurred 
recently in Austria. An Austrian correspondent of 
the Horse Review gives the following account of 
his record as a sire in that country. 

In Austria he sired 26 horses with records bet- 
ter than 1:33 2-10 for the kilometer, or a 2:30 gait 
for the mile, and the dams of 8 horses with records 
better than 1:33 2-10. The best of his get was, no 
doubt, Princess Nefta, out of the Italian mare Nefta, 
by the Russian trotter Gourke. Princess Nefta 
trotted at Baden in 1902 a heat in 2:18 3-10 over 1,655 
meters, or a 2:14 8-10 gait for the mile (1,609 m.) 
Over 2,640 meters she showed a 1:25 9-10 (2:18) gait 
for the kilometer the same year. Another good one 
that Prince Warwick sired was Dominik, out of Tilly 
Brown, by Banker. When two years old Dominik 
won a race over 1,700 meters in 2:38 1-10 or a 2:29 
6-10 gait. At three-years-old he showed a 1:28 8-10 
(2:22 8-10) gait over 2,850 meters, and at five made 
a mile heat record of 2:16 4-10, or 1:24 8-10 for the 
kilometer. 

Prince Warwick was the sire of two winners of 
the Austrian Trotting Derby. Princess Nefta won 
this race in 1898 as she liked in a 1:35 6-10 (2:33 
8-10) gait over 3.300 meters, while Peregrinus, out of 
Marcsa, a Russian mare, won it the following year 
in a 1:38 4-10 (2:38 3-10) gait over a very heavy 
track. For a long term of years the Prince led our 
winning sires, the amount of money won by his get 
being in excess of that won by any other stallion. 
o 

Alta McDonald, who for the first time in thirty-five 
years was out of harness last season, writes to a 
Philadelphia friend from Albany, N. Y., that he is 
taking treatment for his troubles, and feels so much 
encouraged that he hopes to get into the game again 
next season. 

A. B. Coxe, of Paoli, Pa„ has named 16 weanlings 
for the Kentucky Futurity for foals of 1908. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



E 



FACTS ABOUT KID WILKES. 



Since the San Bernardino matinee on Christmas 
day where Kid Wilkes outstepped R. Ambush 2:09%. 
there have been many queries in regard to his 
breeding, what the horse really HAS done, and what 
he can do. 

For the benefit of those interested, I give you a 
few facts concerning what is believed to be an un- 
usually fast green trotter. 

On the 22nd day of July, 190S, I turned Kid Wilkes 
over to Mr. G. H. Parker, now located at the River- 
side Driving Club Park. Mr. Parker then prophesied 
wonders for the little horse, but the results ob- 
tained in the comparatively short time not only speak 
well for his judgment but establish his ability as a 
speed developer and trainer. 

Kid Wilkes had never been driven for speed, and 
knew absolutely nothing of the race track. On Sep- 
tember 9th, he went his first matinee race, winning 
in two straight heats (2:28-2:27), and with appar- 
ently no effort. He scored like an old campaigner, 
and the way he gets away from the wire would 
put a two-minute pacer to shame. Just six weeks' 
training and he was capable of winning in straight 
heats miles under 2:30. 

Kid Wilkes next appearance was at Santa Ana, 
October 16th, 1908 on a mile track. He raced in 
the rain and over a slippery, muddy track, winning 
from Clara (trial mile 2:14%) in 2:20V 2 ; the first 
half in 1:07. On the 29th of the same month he 
again raced Clara, this time over the half mile 
track at Riverside and winning in straight heats, 
best time 2:20. 

Thanksgiving day Kid Wilkes was classed with 
Lauretta 2:18%, and Cryllia Jones 2:14% and this 
time the horsemen expected to see him outclassed. 
But once more he made good, outstepping both 
horses in 2:21%. It was a raw, cold day and a heavy 
wind blowing, making racing very difficult. 

His next performance was on Christmas day, on 
the San Bernardino mile track, where he defeated 
R. Ambush 2:09% and Crylla Jones 2:14%. This 
proved to be a great surprise for every one (unless 
perhaps his driver, Mr. Parker and owner, Mr. W. 
L. Scott), when this comparatively unknown horse 
and a green animal so far as actual racing is con- 
cerned was able to beat a seasoned racer like R. 
Ambush. But Kid Wilkes proved to be a wonder and, 
breaking the matinee record for that track, won 
from the San Bernardino horse in the remarkably 
fast time of 2:10.y 2 

Just five months and three days of actual train- 
ing and education! He has never made a break 
in any race, and Mr. Parker believes he could have 
gone a mile in 2:07 or 2:08 had it been necessary 
to do so. 

Kid Wilkes is a handsome chestnut horse, five 
years old, stands 15.2 hands high and weighs about 
1,000 pounds. 

He is sired by Stanton Wilkes 2:10%, by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16%, out of the dam Romeria, sired by 
Balboa, son of Norfolk. Second dam Romera by 
Romero 2:19%, by A. W. Richmond. Third dam 
Sally by Crichton, sire of the dams of Arrow, pacer, 
2:13%, Ellwood 2:17%, and Barbero 2:29%. 

Kid Wilkes is a cousin to the famous little pacer 
Velox 2:09%. 

W. L. SCOTT, 
Riverside, Cal. 

o 

BON VOYAGE AT PLEASANTON. 



Ted Hayes reached Pleasanton last Sunday with 
the great young race horse and sire Bon Voyage (3) 
2:12% and the horsemen there all say the son of 
Expedition has developed into a grander and better 
looking horse than ever. He will make a good season, 
and Hayes has booked some of the very best mares 
in California already. 

Along with Bon Voyage Hayes brought his string 
of horses that he will train and campaign this year. 
His new acquisition, Velox 2:09% looks as good as 
his reputation and he should get a very low mark 
this year. Alsandra 2:12, is in fine shape and 
headed for the 2:10 list. Moy 2:07%, who was off 
last year, has rounded to, and will give a good ac- 
count of herself before the season is over. Modicum 
2:17% also looks to be able to lower her record, while 
the two-year-old Viaticum by Bon Voyage out of 
Ruth Mary by Directum 2:05% is one of the hand- 
somest colts ever seen at the track. He is entered 
in the big stakes both East and West. 

o 

JAKE BROLLIAR CHALLENGES THE STATE. 



Visalia, California, Jan. 18, 1909. 

Breeder and Sportsman: — I have a Best Policy 
yearling trotter, foaled April 29th, 1908, dam Ethel 
Basler, dam of My Way 2:15%, Stonelita 2:15% and 
Ira Basler 2:17%, that I will race half mile heats, 
best two in three over the Tulare track next Octo- 
ber, against any colt not foaled earlier than April of 
the same year, one for the other. 

I will place in the care and keeping of the Breeder 
and Sportsman a bond of $1,000 approved by the Su- 
perior Court of the county in which I live, as a guar- 
antee to give prompt and peaceable possession of the 
colt in the event of losing the contest or refusing to 
start. This includes any California bred colt whose 
owner shall meet a like condition not later than the 
1st day of March next. Colts are to be minutely de- 
scribed and identified by surety or sureties of said 
bond, both now and on day of race as a guarantee 
against sharp practice. 

JACOB BROLLIAR. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



A NEW YORKER IN CALIFORNIA. 



A New York horseman who is spending the winter 
at San Jose, writes an interesting letter to the New 
York Trotter and Pacer, giving his impressions of a 
Sunday morning scene on the road near San Jose, and 
which is often duplicated at many places in California 
where road racing is a regular Sunday sport. 

San Jose, Cal., Jan. 4, 1909. 

I am a New Yorker spending a few months in Cal- 
ifornia where of late 1 have had the time, or rather, 
the disposition to witness some of the entertainment 
furnished by our generous friends, the harness horses. 
When home my Sunday mornings are generally spent, 
on the Speedway, which 1 imagine is the greatest 
drive in the world; but if our New York friends could 
have been present Sunday afternoon to see the 
weekly matinee of San Jose it might dawn on them 
why the California trotter has risen so high in the 
trotting world, for here you have the old doctrine 
of the survival of the fittest well illustrated. 

The "4-Mile House" on the Monterey Road contigu- 
ous to the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks is the 
scene of the racing; a large water tank marks the 
finish; the course is at the foothills of a mountain 
range that rises to the lofty Mount Hamilton on which 
is the Lick Observatory. It is reached by taking the 
Cemetery car, an ominous name, by those having 
neither horse, broncho nor automobile. The car has 
open and closed sections, and 1 notice the natives in- 
variably crowd the open seats, while I prefer the 
closed ones. No doubt their love of open air makes 
them so ruddy and robust. The temperature here 
rarely touches the freezing point. 

When the racing is at its highest an artist would 
find ample material for a fine Western picture. About 
three hundred are in attendance, but each of them 
is one if there is anything "doing." Corduroy, 
flannel and high leather hunting shoes make up their 
wearing apparel. Pipes and chewing tobacco are 
much in evidence and match races are continually 
being talked of. 

There are colts, old stallions, ancient roadsters and 
pacers with hobbles all tearing down the road in a 
mad scramble, pulling carts, runabouts, buggies and 
phaetons, some with single drivers, but many with 
women aboard urging and shouting wildly at the 
horses to win. It is worth your life to be in the way, 
and the way is a most questionable subject, for the 
hard road is narrow and the limited siding for the 
spectators where they take refuge is generally monop- 
olized by mustangs and cow ponies, some tied to 
posts, some standing loose, but all with their ears 
flattened back in anything but a reassuring manner; 
and all about your feet are dogs galore. As the race 
draws close there is generally a rush to get back 
and it is with no small degree of hesitation that you 
trample on the toes of some of these wild and wooly 
Westerners in preference to dogs or the dubious legs 
of mustangs. After the racers rush past a most dan- 
gerous practice is in vogue and somebody will yet 
be killed. Many of them turn around and race back, 
the last becoming first, which is all but amusing; but 
along comes another brush in the right direction, and 
to see them drive through one another is terrifying, 
to say the least. And there were two accidents; a 
trotter put his foot into the hind wheel of a runabout 
and everything went down. I ran with the crowd only 
to find nobody hurt, horses all right and only one 
spoke broken, probably the one the trotter struck. 
Another time a rig got in the way and a driver swung 
nearly into the crowd, his front wheel hit between 
the hind legs of a shaggy broncho and rider and 
broncho went down in a heap. I figured from the ap- 
pearance of the rider, corduroy breeches, flannel 
shirt, slouch hat, swarthy skin and drooping mus- 
tache, that I was at last to behold a Western killing. 
He sprang up from the mud and started tugging at 
the saddle on the prostrate pony. It was as big as a 
sedan chair, covered with buffalo hair and rawhide, 
and I expected to see him draw from his arsenal some 
sort of a cannon, but my peace of mind was most 
happily restored when I noticed that the saddle had 
only slipped under the horse and was probably hurt- 
ing him and the rider was but trying to pull it 
straight. When he found his horse all right he simply 
smiled. 

By way of variety a race between two thorough- 
breds was arranged though it turned out a hollow vic- 
tory for a handsome chestnut whose pin-fired ankles 
didn't seem to bother him, while his competitor, a 
bay, was so sore in front that he would not extend 
himself on the hard road. At times automobiles and 
motor-cycles rushed through the horses at high speed 
to my great surprise, and two trains at intervals thun- 
dered by, the people all staring out the windows at 
the terrified colts. I have found the safest place to 
watch all this business is across the road on the rail- 
road rail fence which often splits from overcrowding, 
but nevertheless it's the safest. Toward the close 
a dozen young fellows came down from the hills with 
four greyhounds and a dead rabbit that one of the 
dogs had jumped and got right in the way of the 
brushes, and there was a roar of laughter at the way 
those greyhounds jumped. I noticed also a very pe- 
culiar rigging on one of the horses: the reins went 
through two pulleys on either side of the bit and then 
back to the hook on the top of the saddle where the 
check rein fastens. He must have been a terrible 
puller or the driver had a very light touch. 

Among the racers there were some very choice an- 
imals. There was a thoroughbred looking pacing filly 
by Searchlight, another colt by Scott McKlnney, an- 
other by Nearest, brother to John A. McKerron, I 
believe, and an imposing 16-hand heavy black stallion, 
trotter, with coach horse action by Direct. He was 
the biggest Direct I ever saw. A fast baby trotter, 
related, so the driver told me, to ex-champion Free- 



dom, also caught my fancy, and a big chestnut pacer 
that resembled Don Derby was being raced unmerci- 
fully by a man, while his wife whipped the frantic 
animal to innumerable breaks. I could have learned 
more, but didn't like to appear too inquisitive lest 
someone might think 1 had money to invest, which 
would have been rather undesirable, as I had to go 
home in the dark. 

Two miles from here is the home of Budd Doble, 
whom I see very often. He held a big sale not long 
ago of a lot of the get of Kinney Lou. He has a half 
mile track where he works them and they go fast. 

It is no wonder the great horses that hail from 
California have won honors throughout the land as 
perhaps many of them have gradual ed from the same 
school that I have been describing, and after winning 
road honors under such hazardous difficulties it is 
easy to win money on a simple racetrack. 

Respectfully, 

hugh e. Mclaughlin, 

The Angelus Hotel, San Jose, Cal. 

o 

PASADENA HORSE SHOW. 

The fourth annual exhibition of the Southern Cal- 
ifornia Horse Shaw Association of Pasadena is to 
be held at Tournament Park, March 15, 16 and 17, 
and the indications are that it will be the largest 
show ever given in the South. The Los Angeles 
Horse Show Association will not give an exhibition 
this year, and it will throw all its influence toward 
makng the Pasadena exhibition a success. 

In addition to the usual classes there will be di- 
visions for California-bred roadster stallions and their 
get, and for California-bred mares and their foals. 
Last year there was a demand for ladies' astride 
class, and this season it will be made one of the 
features of the show. 

Cash prizes will be given for the largest stables 
exhibited, and Edwin D. Neff, secretary of the As- 
sociation who has been interviewing breeders in 
Central and Northern California, is confident that 
some of the most extensive stables in the North 
will be sent south to the Pasadena show. 

Robert Lee Bettner of Riverside and Richard M. 
Tobin of San Francisco are to take a carload of the 
finest polo ponies in the State, and it is probable 
that F. J. Carolan, Walter Hobart and E. Beylard of 
San Mateo also will send polo ponies. The Burlin- 
game polo team, which now holds the State cham- 
pionship, is expected to be present and exhibition 
matches probably will be arranged with the Riverside 
team. After the horse show, the polo players will 
go to Coronado, where the annual State tournament 
is to be held. 

In the heavy harness classes, P. H. Smith of Santa 
Monica, will exhibit twelve fine horses, which he 
recently brought from the East. Mark Sibley Sev- 
erance of Los Angeles, who has numerous harness 
and saddle horses on his farm near San Bernardino, 
will send a string of standard bred animals. J. W. 
Considine of Seattle has a fine string of animals at 
the Raymond Hotel, Pasadena, and has promised to 
enter them in the exhibition. C. X. Larrabee of 
Montana also will exhibit a string of fine stock. 

Edgar J. De Pue of San Francisco will bring 
down a carload of standard bred animals and two 
carloads of vehicles, including a huge coach for six- 
in hand. Charles Butters of San Francisco, has en- 
tered four carriage and several saddle horses. John 
S. Cravens of Pasadena and Eugene J. DeSabla of 
San Mateo each will enter six standard bred horses. 

John Bakewell Phillips of Pasadena, will show a 
hackney pair, and Cosmo Morgan of Los Angeles 
will have an entry in the gig class. F. W. Tutin 
of Riverside will enter a pair. 

Fifty or more saddle horses in the walk, trot and 
canter class and eight in the high school class are 
to be exhibited. It is expected that many Shetland 
ponies will be shown. Heavy draft horses are to 
be entered by Fred Bixby of Long Beach, Pioneer 
Truck Company of Los Angeles, J. B. Myers of Pas- 
adena and Los Angeles Warehouse Company. 

The directors of the Association are to meet in 
Pasadena tomorrow morning to complete the plans 
for the show. The formal entry list will open about 
March 1. There are no professional horsemen con- 
nected with the Association, and the annual shows 
are conducted entirely for sport. 

The names of the officers and directors of the As- 
sociation follow: Fred E. Wilcox, Pasadena, presi- 
dent; W. J. Hogan, Louisville, vice-president; John 
S. Cravens, Pasadena, vice-president ; Thaddeus Lowe, 
Pasadena, vice-president; Robert Lee Bettner, vice- 
president, Riverside; .lohn B. Miller, Pasadena, vice- 
president; Benjamin Blossom, Pasadena, vice- pres- 
ident; Edwin I). Neff, Pasadena, secretary and treas- 
urer; A. Kingsley, Macomber, Pasadena; D. M. Lin- 
nard, Pasadena; L. V. Harkness, Pasadena; Thomas 
D. Wood. San Diego; Frank V. Rider, Pasadena; E. 
D. Roberts, San Bernardino; Col. John Lambert, 
Pasadena; E. C. Sterling. Redlands; E. H. Groenen- 
dyke. Pasadena; Fred H. Bixby, Long Heach; Milo 
M. Potter, Los Angeles. 

o 

.1. W. GILES, 58 River Street, Auction Market. 

PATKRPON, N. ,T., Dec. 2. 1908. 
Troy Chemical Co.. Bingham ton, N. Y. : 

Gentlemen: — You can advertise that "Save-tho- 
Horse" brought "Oimhlc's" hind tendon perfectly 
sound, which Dr. Pirser, City Veterinary here, said was 
hopeless, lie is ready to race, and sound after the 
veterlnary's Inspection. 

This Is the second case I have cured with your Ine 
remedy. It cured "nasher" 2 I.:', and her tendon was 
In had shape. I also advised Mr. Hayne to use "Save- 
the-IIorse" on whirl hone lameness, which It cured 
Very truly, J. W. GYLES. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



j NOTES AND NEWS J 

Zolock 2:05% will stand at Los Angeles this year. 

Zombro 2:11 will be shipped to Pennsylvania 
April 1st. 



Kinney Lou 2:07% will make the season of 1909 
at the Salinas track. 



The Eel 2:02% lowered the ice record to 2:14% 
recently on a Canadian half mile track. 



There are 250 horses in training at the Memphis 
track and stalls are being applied for every day. 



Ted Hayes has reached Pleasanton with Hon 
Voyage 2:12% and his string of horses in training. 

If you think you have the fastest yearling trotter 
in California, read Jake Brolliar's challenge in an- 
other column. 



There are nine associations in membership with 
the Grand Circuit this year. Where one has dropped 
out two new ones have come in. 



It is stated that Nancy Hanks 2:04 is to be bred 
to her grandson Vice Commodore 2:11, son of Bin- 
gen 2:06% out of Narion by Arion 2:07%. 



Cleveland will be a member of the Grand Circuit 
this year, but the meeting will be held at the new 
mile track at North Randall instead of at Glenville. 



The Occident Stake for foals of 1908, to be trotted 
in 1911, which closed on January 1st this year, re- 
ceived 60 entries. The list appears in our issue this 

week. 



The Chico Driving Association announces that it 
will give its first annual fair and race meeting at 
Chico this year, the week prior to the California 
State Fair. 



Mr. D. L. Bachant, of Fresno, is jogging a nice 
two-year-old by his stallion Athasham 2:09%, that 
is a very fine looker and a square trotter that is 
very promising. 



An advertiser wants to buy a road horse that is 
serviceably sound and has some speed. His limit 
price is $250. Notify this office if you have some- 
thing that will fill the bill. 



Mr. W'. L. James, Secretary of the Los Angeles 
Driving Club, whose office is at 305% South Spring 
street, Los Angeles, will represent the Breeder and 
Sportsman in that city as correspondent. 



Fred Ward has consigned the Steinway mare Ex- 
plosion to the Pleasanton sale in March. This is 
a 2:10 pacer and a grandly bred one, as she is out 
of that great broodmare Flash by Egmont that is 
the dam of four in the list and has two producing 
(laughters. 



The annual sale at Pleasanton will be held on 
March 25th, 26th and 27th. It will be the greatest 
sale ever held on the Coast. Here's where the 
buyers will be. 



Lottie Lynwood, the handsomest and fastest two- 
year-old trotter in California has been consigned to 
the Pleasanton sale in March. She is a full sister 
to the great Sonoma Girl 2:05%, and is paid up on 
in over $100,000 worth of stakes. 



A good sound, gentle road horse by Monterey 
2:09% is offered for sale. Has no faults except that 
he is too slow for his owner. Is a fine family horse. 
$250 will take him. See Dr. Rydberg's advertise- 
ment in this issue. 



The Chico Driving Association is arranging for a 
big matinee on February 22d if the weather should 
permit. Horses will be entered from the clubs at 
Marysville, Oroville, Woodland and Sacramento. 



Charles DeRyder has consigned ten head of high 
class broodmares, colts and fillies to Fred H. Chase 
& Co.'s big sale at Pleasanton, which will be held 
March 25th to 27th. Some of the best bred mares 
and youngsters in California are in this consignment. 



The transposition of a line of type in the list of 
three-year-olds on which payment was made in the 
Breeders' Futurity, January 2d, gave Geo. H. Mc- 
Cann's Palo King filly Palo Maid, the wrong dam. 
Her dam is Fidelity by Falrose. 



Mrs. M. E. Bryson of Linden. Cal., offers for sale 
a Clydesdale stallion eight years old, weighing 2,000 
pound, also a seven-year-old trotting stallion by Guy 
McKinney 38783, weighing 1,100 pounds. Both horses 
are sound and gentle and good foal getters. 



Nearway 44272, eight years old, by Nearest, sire of 
Highfiy 2:04% and Alone 2:09%, out of Camma by 
Norway, is offered for sale. This is a big fine horse 
standing 17 hands and weighing 1,400 pounds. He is 
a great individual and most fashionably bred. See 
advertisement. 



Queer Knight 2:13%, one of the boldest going 
trotters ever seen on a California track will be 
among the horses sold at Chase's Pleasanton sale. 



Ted Hayes is getting a string of horses together 
to campaign on the Grand Circuit, so has consigned 
the pacing mare Moy 2:07% by Prodigal and the 
mare Modicum 2:13 by George Ayers, to Chase's 
big Pleasanton sale which comes off the last of 
March. This promises to be the greatest sale ever 
held in the State. 



There are a few substitutions to be had in Pacific 
Breeders' Futurity Stake No. 8, which has a guaran- 
teed value of $7,000 and is for foals of 1908, now 
yearlings. February 1st is the last date on which 
substitutions can be made. If you have a colt or filly 
that you desire to enter in this stake, apply to Secre- 
tary F. W. Kelley immediately. 



A day of racing was held at the Hilo, H. I., half- 
mile track on January 1st this year. There were 
more than a dozen events, mostly running races. In 
a free-for-all trot and pace Harry Hurst 2:14%, pacer 
by Del win, defeated the old gray ghost Waldo J. 
2:08 and Reddy R. and Parnell in straight heats, 
time 2:33 and 2:30. Later in the afternoon Waldo 
J. defeated the same field in 2:32 and 2:31%. 



Maywood Stock Farm, Hon. Sterling Holt, proprie- 
tor, will please accept our thanks for a handsome 
calendar, on which a picture of the farm's premier 
sire Sidney Dillon appears, surrounded by half-tones 
of his four fastest trotters, the world's champion Lou 
Dillon 1:58%, Ruth Dillon 2:06%, Dolly Dillon 2:06% 
and Stanley Dillon 2:07%, the four fastest trotters 
by one sire in the world. The average record of these 
four is 2:04%. 



Mr. Owen McAleer, of Los Angeles has lost his 
handsome filly Reela Newo. In some unaccounta- 
ble way the filly broke her leg and had to be de- 
stroyed. She was by McKinney out of Eva Wilkes, 
a daughter of Adrian Wilkes. Eva Wilkes is still 
owned by Mr. McAleer, and while the old mare is 
21 years of age, she is as full of life as many five- 
year-olds. The filly had been trained by Will Dur- 
fee and had shown a mile in 2:13. 



Mr. C. B. Wakefield, of Sacramento, advertises 
for sale a seven-year-old bay mare by Owyhee 2:11, 
dam Inex, the dam of Our Jack 2:13%, Owynex 
2:22% and Alamo 2:29%, by Sweepstakes. This 
mare is broken but has been used mainly as a brood- 
mare. She has had two foals by Lynwood W. that 
are very promising. She is offered for $300 if 
sold before she is again sent to a stallion to be 
bred. See advertisement. 



Chester N. Weaver, local manager for the Stude- 
baker Bros.' Company of California left a few nights 
ago for New York City, where he will attend the 
big automobile show and also be present at the pri- 
vate automobile show to be held by the Studebaker 
Bros.' Company of New York, commencing Janu- 
ary 23. The Studebaker show will be held in the 
Company's building, located at Broadway and Sev- 
enth avenue at Forty-eighth street. 



Cleo Dillon (3) 2:13%, winner of the Pacific 
Breeders Futurity and the Occident Stakes last 
year, with total of over $3,600 to her credit as a 
three-year-old, is now in Sam Hoy's stable. She 
has fully recovered from her injured heel and they 
think it will take a good one to show her the way 
round the track during the coming season. Hoy 
also has in his stable the filly Nita H. by Zolock 
2:05%. She is doing well and is considered quite 
a prospect. Both these fillies belong to Mr. E. A. 
Gammon of Courtland, Cal. 



H. Busing is the happiest man in Pleasanton. He 
recently purchased from Nutwood Stock Farm a colt 
by Star Pointer 1:59%, dam Record Searcher by 
Searchlight 2:03%, second dam Zeta Carter, dam of 
Chestnut Tom 2:15 by Dictator, third dam Lida W. 
2:18%, dam of Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, by Nutwood, 
and so on. This is as royally bred as any colt in 
California and is a natural pacer. He should be a 
money winner for Mr. Busing in the races and in 
the stud when he has matured. The colt is a foal of 
1908. He is of good size and great promise. 



Any of our readers who are in want of a good pros- 
pect to race or to use in the stud, should read the 
advertisement which Mr. E. D. Dudley of Dixon, Cal., 
has in our columns this week. He offers for sale at 
a bargain a four-year-old brown stallion by Search- 
light 2:03% out of Bee Sterling, the dam of four in 
the list, and three others that have trialed from 2:12 
to 2:18. This young stallion is a pacer and worked 
a mile last year in 2:14. He can step an eighth in 
15 seconds any time when in condition. This is as 
well bred a Searchlight as there is in California. 
He will be a rare bargain for someone. 



The Hemet, California, News says that Mr. W. F. 
Whittier of that place has set aside a forty acre tract 
of land near town for use of a gentlemen's driving 
club, and those interested in training fine horses. The 
location is an ideal one, only a few minutes' walk 
from the railroad depot, and very convenient for 
San Jacinto and the whole valley. Manager Holloway 
says the survey will be made at once, and work be- 
gun on the track, which will be a half-mile with the 
turns well thrown up. Stables, sheds and fences will 
be built, and it may be that a fair will be given an- 
nually. 



On account of delayed mails, Mr. C. C. Crippen's 
interesting letter about the horses at Santa Cruz, 
Watsonville and San Jo§£ did not reach us in time for 
publication this week. 



It is said that M. W. Savage is now trying to buy 
the pacing mare Brenda Yorke 2:04% by Moko, who 
reduced her record from 2:08% last year. She is by 
Moko out of Grace Tipton by Simmons. 



W. J. Kenney, 531 Valencia street, sent this week 
to L. B. Daniels at Chico a No. 90 speed cart that is 
about the neatest two-wheel affair that has been seen 
in Butte county for some time. Mr. Daniels has a 
few trotters and pacers that will be able to take it 
around the track in better than 2:20 before May 1st, 
providing the rain ever stops. 



The San Francisco Driving Club has elected a 
Board of Stewards that will have charge of all the 
races and the meetings given by the club this year. 
The new board consists of eight members, the presi- 
dent, vice-president and secretary and the following 
members: John Dreschler, James Finch, James 
O'Kane, Jos. Cuicello and M. M. Donnelly. 



E. Stewart & Co., live stock dealers and auction- 
eers, advertise their opening sale of the season for 
Tuesday, January 26th. Two hundred head of horses 
will be sold, one-half of them being of the famous 
double square brand. Those wanting work horses of 
all kinds, from a buggy to a truck horse, should 
be at this sale. One hundred head will be sold 
during the afternoon and one hundred head during 
the evening. The place is the Western Horse Market, 
corner 10th and Bryant streets, San Francisco. 



Dave Ryan 2:13 is offered for sale by his present 
owner at such a low price that he is worth buying 
for farmer's buggy horse. He is such a well bred 
stallion that he should sire speed if given an oppor- 
tunity, which he has never really had. Dave Ryan 
is a pacer and was bred by J. B. Haggin. His sire, 
Anteeolo 15130, is by Antevolo 2:19%, out of the 
producing mare Mabel, full sister to the great Beau- 
tiful Bells. The dam of Dave Ryan is Network by 
Echo, second dam Nettie by Nutwood, and to the 
sixth dam by thoroughbred Whip. The owner of 
Dave Ryan also offers for sale a two-year-old pacer 
by Athablo, son of Diablo and sire of Nogi 2:10%, 
that is fast and paid up on in the Breeders' Futurity. 
See advertisement. 



Mr. Geo. A. Pounder, of Los Angeles, was in San 
Francisco this week and completed arrangements 
with Fred H. Chase & Co. to send his great two- 
year-old filly Lottie Lynwood, full sister to Sonoma 
Girls 2:05%, to the great sale at Pleasanton in March, 
along with that handsome and fast mare Wenja 
2:18%, own sister to Prince Lock (2) 2:18. Mr. 
Pounder, who took to driving for his health and made 
quite a successful compaign on the California cir- 
cuit last year, has business to atend to in the East 
that will require the greater part of his time for the 
next two years, and he will be unable to devote 
any time to his horses, consequently will offer these 
for sale. Lottie Lynwood is entered in over $100,000 
worth of stakes, being paid up in every colt stake 
East and West. Besides being in the Breeders Fu- 
turity, the Occident, Stanford and Canfield stakes, 
she is in the Kentucky Futurity, the Horse Review, 
the Horseman, the Kentucky Stock Farm, and the 
Stallion and Matron stakes of the American Breed- 
ers Association. Lottie Lynwood is a large, finely 
developed filly, foaled in 1907, a line trotter and as 
a yearling showed wonderfully fast. She is as sound 
as a new dollar and her legs are as clean as a 
hound's tooth. Mr. Pounder will not train her this 
winter but jog her and keep her in good condition 
for her new owner to begin on after the sale. She 
should bring more money than any two-year-old has 
brought in California in years. 



Mr. A. B. Coxe of Paoli, Penn., who visited Cali- 
fornia last winter and purchased a number of well 
bred trotters while here, is again in the State, but 
will leave for a visit to the Hawaiian Islands to-day. 
Mr. Coxe, while in San Frannisro this week, pur- 
chased the McKinney mare Hazel Kinney 2:09% and 
will ship her to his farm in Pennsylvania to use as 
a brood mare. Among the noted mares on his farm 
is the famous Sunol 2:08%, bred by the late Senator 
Stanford, and holder at one time of the world's trot- 
ting record. Sunol has been a most unfortunate 
brood mare. She did not produce a foal until she 
was fourteen (she is now twenty-three) and her first 
two foals died. During the last nine years she has 
produced six foals, but only two or three are alive. 
She is now safely in foal to the dead sire Todd 2:14%, 
but missed to Guy Axworthy last year. She is the 
world's champion trotter to high wheels, and in her 
day held the world's two, three, four and five-year-old 
trotting records. Among the brood mares which Mr. 
Coxe owns are Tuna 2:08% by James Madison, Elec- 
tric Maiden 2:12, She 2:12% and others. He also 
owns the great three-year-old of last year, The Lead- 
ing Lady, that was only beaten a head by The Har- 
vester 2:08% in the second heat of the Kentucky 
Futurity. The Leading Lady's record is 2:07 and she 
is by Bingen 2:06% out of a mare by Heir-at-Law. 
When Mr. Coxe was at Pleasanton last winter he saw 
the five-year-old black roan mare by Bonnie Direct 
2:05% out of Nettie O. by Lakeland Pilot in the 
string of Griffith & McConnell, and afterwards bought 
her through correspondence for $1,000, naming her 
Miss Griffith. This mare started six times last year 
on half mile tracks and took a record of 2:14% trot- 
ting, winning four races. She is to be bred this year 
to Moko. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



THE OCCIDENT STAKES. 



List of Entries in Stake of 1911, and Those on Which 
Payments Were Made in Stakes 
of 1910 and 1909. 



Assistant Secretary L. R. Miller of the California 
State Agricultural Society sends us the following lists 
of colts and fillies entered and paid up on the Occi- 
dent Stakes of 1911, 1910 and 1909, which are for 
three-year-old trotters. As our readers probably 
know, the Occident Stake is given every year and is 
the leading three-year-old trotting event on the Pa- 
cific Coast. The entrance fee is $100, made in several 
payments, and the Agricultural Society adds $400 to 
the stakes. The lists are as follows: 

OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1!»1T — CLOSED JANUARY 1ST, 
t<)0!> — UO ENTRIES, 



Frank E. Alley's b. h. Count Boni by Bon Voyage- 
Welladay. 

Frank E. Alley's blk. b. Sitka Boy by Greco B.-Oniska. 
J. N. Anderson's blk. c. Farewell by Bon Voyage- 
Nora D. 

C. B. Bigelow's b. m. Dorothy Ansel by Prince Ansel- 
Lucy B. 

Eugene F. Binder's b. f. Miss Worth While by Worth 

W bile- Fern wood. 
Alex Brown's br. c. by Prince Ansel-Daisy B. 
Alex Brown's ch. f. by Prince Ansel-Lauress. 
Alex Brown's b. f. by Prince Ansel-Everette. 
W. W. Collins' b. c. Life Policy by Best Policy-Lou 

Lively. 

S. Christensen's br. c. by Bon Voyage-Marguerite. 

J. G. Cuicello's br. f. by Bonnie Direct-Mona. 

L. B. Daniels' gr. c. by Prince Ansel-Serpolo. 

J. F. Davies' ch. c. by Bon Voyage-Miss Sidney Dillon. 

E. D. Dudley's ch. c. Pimento by Palite-Paprika. 

W. G. Durfee's b. c. by Del Coronado-by Robt. Mc- 
Gregor. 

W. G. Durfee's br. c. by Del Coronado-Gossiper. 
Wv G. Durfee's blk. c. by Del Coronado- by Lynmont. 
W. G. Durfee's ch. f. by Zolock-Irene S. 
W- G. Durfee's b. f. by Del Coronado-Subita. 
L. C. Gates' ch. c. White Wings by Almont Boy-Dew 
Drop. 

W. A. Glasscock's b. m. Dell Murray by Murray M.- 
Bay Queen. 

F. Gommet's b. f. by Prince McKinney-Arrawanna B. 
F. Gommet's br. f. by Alta Vela-Zorella. 

H. H. Hellman's br. f. Bessie J. by Alconda Jay-Elec- 
tress Wilkes. 

H. S. Hogoboom's b. f. Beautiful Morn by Iran Alto- 
Beautiful Bird. 

F. H. Halloway's b. f. Hemet Girl by Geo. W. McKin- 
ney-Lady Woolsey. 

J. B. Iverson's b. c. by Nutwood Wilkes-Ivoneer. 

M. C. Reefer's ch. c. by Prince Ansel-Advosta. 

W. S. Maben's br. c. Dick W. by Walter Barker-Sue. 

W. S. Maben's b. f. Hermosa by Walter Barker-Mamie 
Elizabeth. 

W. S. Maben's b. f. Redena by Redlack-Dixie W. 
J. W. Marshall's b. c. Zomblack by Zombro-Madeline. 
A. B. Miller's gr. c. Division by Zombro-Rose Gifford. 
W. T. McBride's ch. c. John G. Lewis by Nut. Wilkes- 
Palo Belle. 

A. L. McDonald's ch. c. The Grafter by Lynwood W.- 
Nellie Fairmont. 

W. C. Parson's ch. c. by Albert Mac-Bell. 

Dana Perkins' b. c. Amor by Zombro-Zaya. 

Rush & Haile's b. f. by Zombro-Hahora. 

M. S. Severance's b. c. Scout by Ambush-Rosedrop. 

Chas. F. Silva's b. c. by Del Coronado-Swiftbird. 

Chas. F. Silva's blk. f. by Del Coronado-Queen S. 

Thos. Smith's b. f. by Gen. J. B. Frisbie-Venus Derby. 

C. A. Spencer's blk. f. Zoma by Zombro-The Bloom. 

John Sugalian's br. c. Buster by Tom Smith-Foxey. 

L. H. Todhunter's blk. c. by Bon Voyage-The Silver 
Bell. 

L. H. Todhunter's blk. f. by Bon Voyage-Loma B. 
L. H. Todhunter's b. f. by Bon Voyage-Zomitella. 
L. H. Todhunter's b. c. by Zombro- Jeanette B. 
J. H. Torrey's blk. c. Zomack by Zolock-Elloretta. 
W. E. Tuttle's br. f. by Zombro-Maud McAlto. 
M. H. Tuttle's b. f. by Zombro-Ramona B. 
F. W. Wadham's ch. c. Treatway by Strathway-Johan- 
nah Treat. 

Geo. L. Warlow's blk. c. by Stanford McKinney-Nar- 
cola. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. by Stanford McKinney-Lust- 
rine. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. by Athadon-Cora Wickersham. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b. f. by Athadon-Bessie. 

C. P. Warbuton's br. c. Stella McKinney by Ed Mc- 

Kinney-Ella W. 
C. W. Whitehead's b. e. Main Guy by Oro Guy-Mina B. 
Harold Williams' b. c. Allolium by Constructor-Star. 
J. W. Zibbell's b. f. by Tom Smith-Kate Lumry. 



OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1010 — SECOND PAYMENT OF 
915 EACH — MADE ON 47 FOALS. 



Thos. H. Brents' b. f. Princess del Norte by Del Norte- 
Laurelia. 

Elmo Montgomery's b. f. Nukina by Nushagak-Kino- 
cha. 

Alex Brown's br. c. Rey Lot by El Bio Rey-Lottie. 
W. A. Clark, Jr.'s bi. c. Jean Valjean by Bon Voyage- 
She. 

W. A. Clark, Jr.'s b. c. Bon Vivant by Bon Voyage- 

Reina del Diablo. 
W. A. Clark, Jr.'s b. c. Voyageur by Bon Voyage-Lucy 

May. 

William E. Detels' b. c. Bon Guy by Bon Voyage-La 
Moscovita. 

W. G. Durfee's b. c. by Del Coronado-Pineapple. 
E. D. Dudley's b. c. Pal by Palite-Lorna Doone. 
I. N. Harlan's b. c. Prince Alto by Iran Alto-Rita R. 
William Hashagen's gr. c. Kinney H. by Kinney Rose- 
Leta H. 

H. H. Hellman's b. m. by Kinney Lou-Electress Wilkes. 

E. P. Heald's b. f. by Count Hannibal-Nona Washing- 

ton. 

H. S. Hogoboom's br. c. Clear Voyage by Bon Voyage- 
Carrie Malone. 

J. B. Iverson's ch. f. Salinas Girl by Nut. Wilkes-Ivo- 
neer. 

J. If. Kelly's ch. c. by Bolock-Violet. 

F. A. Ramsey's b. f. by R. Ambush - Hytu. 

Ea Siesta Ranch's b. c. It by Bonnie Direct-Wanda 
II. 

La Sie.-ita Ranch's b. c. Lord Isle by Zolock-Lady Belle 
Isle. 

William Lindsay's blk. f. Dolly Madden by Almaden- 
Queen. 

J. W. Marshall's blk. c. Zoblack by Zolock-Madeline. 
Abe Mark's b. m. Ethel Marks by Wayland W.-Ce- 
cille M. 

W. S. Maben's ch. f. Eilleen by Walter Parker-Mamie 
Elizabeth. 

W. C. McCully's br. c. Sylmar by Cedrlc Mac-Concha. 
W. B. Mosher's br. c. Heinle Sneider by Zombro-Ath- 
alene. 

C. Nanny's b. f. Ella by Athby-Lucy. 

Ed. S. Parker's b. c. by Bon Voyage-Mlssie Medium. 

W. C. Parons' ch. f. by Albert Mac-Bell. 

Henry Peters' br. c. by Jules Verne-Little Babe. 

Geo. A. Pounder's ch. f. Lottie Lynwood by Lynwood 
W.-Maud Fowler. 

C. C. Price's b. f. Miss Price by Zombro-Miss Wil- 
liams. 



Thos. Ryan's br. f. Miss May Belle by Jimmy S. -Kitty. 
Chas. F. Silva's b. f. by Demonio-Polka Dot. 
Chas. F. Silva's b. f. by Demonio-Queen S. 
N. M. Strong's b. f. You Tu by R. Ambush-Azeta. 
J. H. Torrey's b. f. Zella by Zombro-Manila. 
L. H. Todhunter's b. f. Bon Voyage-The Silver Belle. 
L. H. Todhunter's br. c. by Bon Voyage-Loma B. 
L. H. Todhunter's b. c. by Zombro-Florette. 
E. S. Train's ch. f. Brewery Belle by Steam Beer-Belle 
Fredericks. 

Valencia Stock Farm's b. c. by Zombro-La Belle. 
Valencia Stock Farm's br. c. by Zombro-Puckachee. 
.1. Walker's b. c. by Zombro-Lady S. 
Geo. L. Warlow's blk. c. Stratbboule by Strathalie- 
Strathway. 

C. A. Canrield's b. c. Donsham by Aathadon-Cora 
Wickersham. 

E. J. Weldon's br. f. Expedio by Lijero-Mater Expedio. 
W. W. Yandell's b. c. Jim Johnson by OsiU -LSlack 
Bess. 

OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1!MH» — THIRD PAYMENT OF 
825 BACH HADE ON l!t FOALS. 



Elizabeth G. Bonlilio's b. c. Crescendo by Nutwood 
Wilkes-Atherine. 

W. O. Bowers' ch. c. Zack by Silver Bee-Sadie Benton. 

Alex Brown's br. f. Curlew by Nushagak-Nutllower. 

Geo. H. Fox's b. c. by Cresceus by Silpan. 

Mrs. T. B. Gibson's b. f. Virginia Lee by Iran Alto- 
Maggie. 

E. P. Heald's b. f. by Tom Smith -Lady Marvin. 
S. H. Hoy's ch. f. Complete by Palite-Camilla. 
W. S. Maben's b. c. Volante by Zombro-Mamie Eliz- 
abeth. 

William Morgan's blk. c. Tracy by Direcho-Grace McK. 
Chris. G. Owen's br. f. Lou McKinney by Kinney 

Lou-Nancy O. 
Dana Perkins' b. c. All Style by Stam B.-Zaza. 
('has. F. Silva's b. f. Stam B.-Swift Bird. 
Thos. Smith's blk. c. Vallejo King by Gen. J. B. Fris- 

bie-Reinette. 
L H. Todhunter's b. f. by Zombro-Loma B. 
W. G. Durfee's b. or br. f. Zulu Belle by Petigru- 

Johannah Treat. 
J. W. Wheeler's b. f. Leona Wilkes by Marvin Wilkes- 

Stella. 

C. W. Whitehead's b. f. Snixie by Delphie-Mina B. 
C. W. Williams' br. f. Nalta W. by Unimak-Alta Nola. 
J. W. Zibbell's b. c. Eddie G. by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 

O 

FROM LOS ANGELES. 



All the prospective starters in the matinee of the 
Los Angeles Driving Club to be held on January 30th 
are taking advantage of every clear day to get in 
shape for their respective races, but the continued 
rains followed each night and morning by heavy fogs, 
have interfered with their workouts, though all have 
been getting stiff road work, and a week or so of sun- 
shine to dry out the track and enable them to brush 
a little will get them back to their speed. 

The American National Live Stock Association will 
be in session here the last few days of the month 
and their program of entertainment, arranged by the 
Chamber of Commerce winds up with the matinee 
races, so a large atendance is anticipated by the 
club. 

Ted Hayes shipped Velox 2: 09%, Alsandra 2:12, 
Viaticum, two-years-old by Bon Voyage 2:12% and 
Bon Voyage himself to Pleasanton last Saturday. Ted 
will train the first three there for their Eastern cam- 
paign and Bon Voyage will make the season there 
but will not be taken East this year. The following 
season it is contemplated getting him ready to 
lower his record after twelve months complete let 
up. Of the three compaigners little need be said 
as their performances are well known on the Coast. 
The chestnut stallion Velox has a license this year 
to go as fast as an/body*s horse and that he will race 
in company was demonstrated in the three or four 
starts he made last year. At Phoenix he was 
beaten a nose in 2:03% (the time was hung out 
slower, 2:04%), and his driver was twice cautioned 
to go on and win — not wanting to mark the stud he 
carried the pole horse to the three-quarters in 1:33 
when practically the race ended as Velox jogged 
home in 2:09%. In his race here against Copa 
de Oro at the Thanksgiving matinee, he stepped 
two of the quarters in better than 30 seconds, out 
in third or fourth position and to all appearances 
going within himself; certainly at no time was he 
"driven." He is a strong, compactly built horse, 
wears practically nothing, a child can drive him, lie 
never makes a mistake, and notwithstanding the 
strong infusion of thoroughbred blood in him on 
his dam's side, is level headed and can be placed 
any where. He can score down to the wire like a 
run-a way, and yet always under control by the voice. 
George Bonnell, who drove him last year, did not 
even have loops on his reins. He is considered by 
all who have seen him race as being far and away 
the best pacer that California has ever produced 
and one that has as much right to improve and get 
into the "star" class as Geo. Gano or any other pacer 

alive. 

Alsandra 2:12, is a model of a trotter in and out 
of harness and is in about, the easiest class, if there 
is such a thing any more, down the line. He is look- 
ing strong and fat after his limited fall season and 
should prove a money winner for Hays. Last sea- 
son at Santa Rosa he showed a trial in 2:09, last half 
in l:02 , /z and last quarter in 30% seconds. That 
certainly looks good enough to pay entrance fees 
on. 

The two-year-old Viaticum is staked all through 
the East and like all his brothers that I have seen 
has phenomenal speed for his age, quarters in 34 
seconds and halves in 1:15 when thirteen or fourteen 
months old and like all the Bon Voyage colts, good- 
headed and fond of the game. 

Any trainer would feel justified in going anywhere 
with that "bunch" and feel confident, barring acci- 
dents, to earn three square meals a day and a re- 
turn ticket, on the "cushions" home. 

A. B. Coxe, who has a stock farm near Philadelphia, 
Penn., was here last week and as usual spent most 
of his time at Agricultural Park looking over the well 
bred mares and young things. He was particularly 



interested in the Bon Voyage colts, as he bought 
She, the dam of one of them last spring when he 
was here and she is in foal to Bon Voyage new. He 
was very much impressed with the appearance of 
Alsandra and had a long talk with Hays about him, 
but with what result I have not heard. Mr. Cox left 
for the North last Thursday but will return about 
the first of March and is more than likely to find 
something to take home with him. 

Tifflin, of Vancouver, is still here looking 'round. 
He bought Neer Girl and shipped her north last 
week and is now looking at another mare or two 
with a view to getting them to breed to his Wilkes 
stud. He is also looking at L. E. McLellan's bay 
gelding Red Boy with the intention of mating him 
up with Neer Girl for a double team of roadsters 
They ought to step some to the pole as they are 
gaited alike, dispositioned alike, about the same size 
and though Red has the most speed, he is strong 
enough to pull more than his share of the load 
and so let the mare do her best. 

"Silver" Hill Riley arrived last Friday from Texas, 
where he had been very ill with pneumonia. He 
looks as if he had had a hard siege of it, but even in 
the few days he has been here he says he has greatly 
improved and his voice (w-hich is my fortune sir, she 
said), has certainly grown stronger. He reports the 
pool selling down the Grand Circuit last season the 
worst he ever saw. He is as good an auctioneer of 
live stock as he is of pools and has conducted many 
successful sales. 

Mart Demarest of Prince Alert fame is also here 
and staying at the Van Nuy's. Agricultural Park 
sees but little of him, however, for the "bang tails" 
at Santa Anita claim most of his attention though 
occasionally he takes a day off and goes to see his 
first love, the harness horse. He says that he has 
entirely recovered from his terrible accident at 
Readville a few years ago in which his leg was so 
crushed that the surgeons said there was no hope of 
asving it and would have amputated but for Dem- 
arest's refusal. He has been out of the sulky for two 
years but that is no sign he has quit the "game.'' 
He told me that Jimmie Gatcomb, the owner of Au- 
dubon Boy 1:59% came very near loosing his arm 
a short time ago from blood poisoning, contracted 
from a horse he was caring for, but is now all right 
again. He has Audubon Boy at home with him in 
Concord, N. H., and is working on a lot of very prom- 
ising colts by him, most of them trotters. 

JAMES. 

o 

KINNEY LOU WILL BE AT SALINAS. 



Budd Doble has decided to take his great trotter 
Kinney Lou 2:07% to Salinas track for the season 
of 1909, and this should be good news for the breed- 
ers of the Salinas valley, as it places them within 
reach of one of the greatest stallions now standing 
for public service in America. 

Mr. Doble has three or four of Kinney Lou's get 
that he desires to train and has selected the Salinas 
track after giving it a thorough inspection, which is 
a great compliment to that track as Mr. Doble is an 
expert on what a first-class training track should be. 
The country about Salinas is one of the best on this 
Coast, the soil and climate being unexcelled. There 
are as many sunshiny days there as anywhere in the 
world and the air is balmy and pleasant at all 
seasons of the year. There are many well bred 
mares owned in that section of the State, and breed- 
ers from San Luis Obispo to San Jose will find the 
shipments to Salinas are easy and inexpensive. 

Kinney Lou 2:07%, whose record was made in an 
actual race where the contest was for a big purse 
and in which he met such horses as John Taylor 
2:08%, Jay McGregor 2:07% and a field of ten more 
high-class trotters, and beat "them for $5,000 in 
straight heats, shows that he was no "carpet knight" 
the year Mr. Doble campaigned him, although he was 
suffering from distemper during the whole season. 
Kinney Lou proved himself a great and dead-game 
race horse, and with but limited opportunities thus far 
is getting an excellent reputation as a sire of early 
and extreme speed. Try to buy one of his colts and 
you will find that they are very highly thought of 
by those who own them. Kinney Lou has three 
standard performers already and last year was the 
first time any of his get were ever raced. There is 
one great inducement for breeders to patronize this 
horse, and that is the uniform good looks of his get. 
They are all handsome young horses and, having 
extreme speed as well, they show that with good 
mares he will be one of the greatest of McKinney's 
sons. Those who send mares 'to Kinney Lou this 
year will be wise, as his foals are certain to be very 
profitable horses to raise. 

o 

AMERICAN HORSE BREEDERS FUTURITY. 



The conditions governing the 1909 Futurity of the 
American Horse Breeder, Boston, will be more lib- 
eral than ever. The purse will have a guaranteed 
value of $11,000, and it will only cost $1 to Dominate 
a mare. The second payment will be but $3 instead 
of $5, and this will be payable in November on the 
foal. On May 2nd a payment of $5 will be due on 
the yearling, and there are no further payments until 
the year of the race. In short it will only cost 
$9 to keep a foal in this $11,000 slake from the date 
of entry to year of race. The purse is divided, $6,000 
for three-year-old trotters, $4,000 to the winner; 
$2,000 to two-year-old trotters, $1,300 to the winner; 
$3,000 to three-year-old pacers, $2,000 to the winner. 
Nominations of dams of winners will be liberally re- 
warded. Entries will close March 15th and there 
are no substitutions. 



I 



THI BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. De W ITT. 



SHEEP DOG TRIALS. 



Up in the North of England, in the famous Lake 
country, there is a small village known as Troutbeck. 
Here every year the community of sheep-herders 
gather together to witness a sport as dear to them 
almost as their very homes, being connected as it is 
with their actual livelihood. It is a sport absolutely 
unknown to the greater mass of the people even in 
England, yet it calls forth the unqualified admiration 
of all who see it. For it is a display, not of brute 
force, nor of human powers, but of the intelligence 
of dogs. Not "instinct," mind you, but quick, thought- 
ful intelligence. 

It is of the North country sheep-dog trials that I 
am speaking. While horse-racing calls for highly 
developed wind and muscle; and hound trials are but 
examples of speed, endurance, and the natural in- 
stincts of the dogs; and human sports, such as jump- 
ing, wrestling, running, and the like, need little more 
than strength and cunning; the dog trials require, 
beyond all degree of these attributes, a very high 
degree of intelligent reasoning power. 

For a long time the Troutbeck dog trials have 
taken place each year in August, and until quite 
recently the prize given was always a silver cup, 
which was treasured as a proof of the winning dog's 
skill and the herder's patient training. Now, how- 
ever, by the desire of the younger participators, 
money has been substituted. 

The course selected on this occasion was on the 
Applethwaite Fells, where the rough hillsides are 
covered with bracken and heather, with gray lichen- 
coated rocks jutting out here and there in strong 
relief against the golden browns and yellow of the 
bracken and the purple of the heather. The fells 
were treeless from top to bottom; strange-looking 
loose stone walls encircled the hills, winding their 
seemingly purposeless way, serpent-like, through 
crag and hollow; a small stream, almost hidden from 
view by the tall bracken, came trickling down the 
hillside. Quite inconspicuous was this stream, and 
yet it influenced the fortunes of more than one good 
dog, for the day was hot and the water cool, and 
many dogs gave way to the temptation and stopped 
to slake their thirst. 

The course along which the dogs were to take the 
sheep began at a small triangular pen, running thence 
in a northeasterly direction uphill and to the east of 
a flag. From there it went northward down hill, 
across the stream already mentioned, uphill, and 
between two flags which were placed to the eastward 
of a high, rocky crag; then nearly due west, crossing 
a small gully, and passing between other two flags; 
next southward, along fairly level ground covered 
with bracken, to and between the last pair of flags; 
and from there to the finishing pen. The whole dis- 
tance from start to finish was about three-quarters 
of a mile. 

The man whose dog was working stood on a knoll 
about one hundred and fifty yards from the starting 
point, and not until the sheep were almost at the 
finishing pen was he allowed to leave his place. 
From the knoll he had to guide his dog as best he 
could by signs and signals, shrill whistling, and 
sometimes calling. 

Forty-two dogs were entered on the lists, divided 
into three classes: competitors for Local Stakes for 
the district within a radius of ten miles from Win- 
dermere Railway Station; Special Stakes for the 
district within twenty miles of the station; and Open 
Stakes for all comers. Among the principal rules 
governing the trials were the following: "Any dog 
that injures a sheep will be disqualified." "No dogs 
except those competing will be allowed on the 
grounds." "All sheep-dogs entered must have been 
not less than three months the bona fide property of 
the exhibitor, and, except when competing, must be 
held by a cord or chain, under penalty of disquali- 
fication." "No person will be allowed with the dog 
competing except the man working it, and he will 
be placed where the judges direct." 

The number of sheep for each dog was three, two 
of which were Herdwicks and the third a half-breed. 
For each trial three fresh sheep are used, these 
being taken from the herd penned behind the stone 
wall which marked the southern boundary of the 
grounds, and placed in the small starting pen. 

At 9:30 a. m. the trials commenced, and the first 
herder, J. R., stood on the knoll, holding in leash 
his splendid gray dog Laddie. The dog seemed to 
realize that some special effort was called for to-day, 
and looked inquiringly first at his master and then 
toward the judges' tent. He seemed to be waiting 
eagerly to be released. The waving of a red flag 
was the signal for the simultaneous release of the 
three penned sheep and the anxious gray dog. At 
once the latter made toward the three bewildered 
sheep, directed at first by his master's call, for the 
bracken was high and hid the animals from the dog's 
view. 

It was not long before he saw them, however. 
Without seemingly paying the slightest attention to 
his master's call, he hurried them along at a lively 
speed. Up the stone-covered hillside they scampered 
till they reached the first flag; then Laddie stopped 
an instant for orders — a simple whistle, which he 
understood — and once more the three sheep were 



off, with the dog following close behind, guiding them 
carefully and keeping all three closely bunched to- 
gether as they passed the first of the series of flags. 
Then, following the master's signals, Laddie urged 
them on over still rougher ground, watching intently 
lest any should attempt to escape. Over the top of 
the hill and down the slope they went, faster and 
faster, until, sitll bunched, the brook was passed 
and they were going uphill toward the first pair of 
flags. Then one of the sheep made a bolt toward 
the lower part of the crag, but Laddie turned it back 
quick as a flash, thereby saving much time. Once 
more they made for the opening between the two 
flags that seemed to be planted so very close to- 
gether. When quite near, they hesitated and had 
to be urged on. As soon as they started in the right 
direction Laddie lay down and watched them as they 
walked slowly along, leaving the flags on either side. 

Looking toward his master for new directions, he 
quickly overtook his charges, who were slowly mak- 
ing their way for the hilltop, and, turning them in 
the direction of the next flag, now forced them into 
a gallop. Over the rocks they went, surefooted as 
goats, frequently lost to view among the bracken, 
but each time reappearing with the gray dog close at 
their heels. 

Nearer and nearer they came, to within six feet 
of the flags, and seemed to be going well, when 
suddenly, without warning, they galloped off to the 
wrong side. The bracken was so high that the poor 
dog had not seen the second mark. "Coom t'ime, 
lad! coom t'ime!" shouted his master, and then the 
dog realized that a mistake had been made, and ran 
to a clear piece of ground, from which he could see 
his master and get his signals. The sheep, fortu- 
nately, had stopped soon after passing the flag, and 
the dog understood that they must be driven back 
outside the mark (for such is the rule), then turned 
sharply around and brought between the two flags. 

How he understood it is difficult for us to realize, 
but that he did was proved by his actions; try as 
the sheep might to go the wrong way, Laddie, now 
coaxing them, soon had all three in position for 
starting again for the narrow way that led between 
the two fluttering flags. 

"T'hame, Laddie! t'hame!" called his master; and 
Laddie turned those sheep sharply around and 
brought them between the two red and white flags 
at full gallop. 

It was well done, and the people gave the dog 
three subdued cheers — subdued because much noise 
would have distracted his attention. For this reason 
you seldom hear much shouting or clapping of hands 
until after the penning has been accomplished. 

Sheep and dog came rapidly toward the pen, jump- 
ing the high bracken, dodging thick clumps of 
heather, and scrambling over loose rocks. Straight 
as a die they came on until they were within a 
hundred yards or so of the pen, when Laddie was 
signalled to lie down, while the sheep, no longer 
driven, were glad of the opportunity to rest. J. R., 
leaving the knoll, came running down among the 
heather that clothed the steep hillside, to help at 
closer quarters in the penning. The trial was a near 
thing, for only one minute and twenty seconds of the 
allowed time remained, and the penning is a difficult 
matter, which requires care as well as time. The 
pen consists of three hurdles placed triangular, the 
entrance being but wide enough to admit a full-sized 
sheep. Standing as it does in the open, without 
anything in the way of a path leading to it, it is the 
very last place that a sheep would think of entering 
of its own accord. 

J. R. stood at one side of the pen and beckoned 
Laddie to bring the three scared-looking sheep for- 
ward. Slowly they came until quite near the goal; 
then, before the man or dog could stop them, all 
three bolted past, and fully half a minute was lost in 
bringing them back. 

At last, by coaxing ever so gently, they were taken 
to the pen, and two were passed through the narrow 
entrance and penned. The third, however, turned 
at the critical moment and bolted. 

Time was nearly up; but a few seconds remained. 
Could the animal be recovered before those seconds 
had passed? 

The spectators held their breath and watched 
intently; the time-keeper stood, watch in hand, 
ready to call the fatal word "Time," while the man 
and the dog were working with nervous energy. It 
was a race against the second hand of a watch, and 
the odds were in favor of the second hand. For- 
tunately the two sheep in the pen had remained 
there, so the undivided attention was given to bring- 
ing in the third, which had run about fifty yards 
before Laddie could turn it. Back they came, the 
driven and the driver, until once more they were 
close to the pen. Then the dog dropped down, with 
his head on his paws, watching the sheep as it 
stood near the narrow entrance. 

Nearer and nearer came the man, with arms out- 
spread, while the dog crawled on his belly toward 
the staring, panting sheep. Once the sheep turned 
as though to run, when quick as a flash, Laddie stood 
up and took a step forward, ready to cut off the 
retreat; but the sheep, thinking better of it, turned 
toward the pen, and, after hesitating a moment, 
slowly entered, one second ahead of time. 



It was a good piece of work; the dog had missed 
no points, had made good retrieves, and had penned 
his sheep within the required time. So the crowd 
gave the plucky fellow three cheers that bounded 
against the rocky sides of the mountain, and went 
echoing over the fells and fens until lost to hearing. 

Of the many other dogs entered in the first class, 
but few were so fortunate as Laddie. Some were 
unlucky enough to have a bad trio of sheep — and 
much depends on how the sheep behave. Some are 
wild and will not run together; others travel too fast 
and cannot be checked; while others again are too 
low and require constant urging. One of the dogs 
lost control of his sheep at the very commencement, 
each of the three running in a different direction, 
and the dog, though a good one (as he proved him- 
self in the open stakes, which he won), was unable 
to collect them in the time allowed. This class was 
won, not by Laddie, but by an old dog named Jack, 
who gave one of the finest exhibitions of the day, 
making some wonderful retrieves, keeping his sheep 
well in hand, while he completed the course and 
penning in seven minutes and thirty seconds. 

The next class was run during the extreme heat 
of the day, and now it was that the tantalizing brook 
proved a temptation too strong for many of the dogs. 
One dog who was doing good work owed his failure 
to the strains of music that came across the hills 
from a band of itinerant musicians, who, with an 
eye for gain, had taken their stand near the crowd 
of spectators. Their lively tunes distracted the dog, 
and he became confused by the strange mixture of 
sounds, and lost many minutes in his endeavors to 
understand his master's orders. 

The time for this, the second class, was reduced 
to eight minutes, and of the thirteen dogs entered, 
only one penned within the time without missing 
a point. That fortunate dog was Laddie, who had a 
minute to his credit when the sheep were safely in 
the pen. 

One of the shepherds lost his temper completely 
because his dog, a young one, little over a year old, 
gave tongue when the sheep refused to do his bid- 
ding. It is against the rules and regulations for a 
dog to bark during the trials, and as the young dog 
broke these rules, his master's voice came ringing 
through the air. He called out angrily "Shoot yo' 
mouth, will ye! Hae ye nowt better to do than 
yowl? What'll yon people think on ye, ye miserable 
yowling tyke! I'll make it proper hot for ye, an' I 
get ye hame, oor I'm gradely mistaken." Whether 
or not he made it "proper hot" for the dog was not 
known, but the people said his anger was to some 
extent justified. 

It will be noticed by any one who witnesses the 
sheep-dog trials that the actual penning within a 
certain limit of .time does not always call forth the 
greatest amount of applause, for so much depends, 
of course, on how the sheep behave. The dog that 
does well with difficult sheep, making good recov- 
eries and generally handling them well, receives far 
more of the public's commendation, and certainly 
deserves more, than the dog who chances to have a 
set of sheep that are easily worked. 

At the conclusion of the trials three prizes were 
given to the handsomest collies competing. When 
the name "collie" is used, it must be understood that 
these dogs are not the handsome, heavily-coated 
dogs known in Cumberland as "fancy collies," but 
more or less shaggy dogs with not very thick coats. 
They are lighter in build and rather longer than 
the fancy collie, and vary greatly in color — black, 
black and tan, blue, gray, and sable being the colors 
usually seen. — A. Radclyffe Dugmore, in Everybody's 
Magazine. 



Good Work of a Game Warden. — Walter Welch, 
game warden of Santa Cruz county, has perfected 
and placed on foot a movement that should find en- 
couragement not only in every county of this State, 
but also in every State of the Union, and that is, 
interesting the attention of our youths to the import- 
ance of fish and game protection education. In this 
he states: 

During the past year, with the assistance of the 
teachers in the public scools of the county, I have 
been able to interest several hundred boys, between 
the ages of 6 and 16 years in the cause of fish, game, 
song bird and forest protection. These boys have 
become members of the juvenile department of the 
"California Game and Fish Protective Association." 
Each boy has been supplied with a suitable mem- 
bership card and appropriate button. 

On December 3, 1908, I organized the "Santa Cruz 
County Fish, Game and Forest Protective Associa- 
tion." 

This association now has a membership of nearly 
two hundred, composed of leading and prominent 
citizens of Santa Cruz county. 



Club Disbanded — The Victor Gun Club of San 
Rafael was disbanded at a meeting of its members 
last Wednesday night and is now a memory of the 
past. The club preserves in the Lucas valley have 
been taken over by a new organization, the Loma 
Alta Gun Club, which was formed to succeed the 
old club. Many members of the defunct club have 
been elected members of the new club. The offi- 
cers of the Loma Alta are: Henry C. Collins, pres- 
ident; Ben J. Baum, vice-president; John Schlosser, 
treasurer and P. H. Cochrane, secretary. There are 
about twenty members on the roll. 



Subscribe for The Breeder and Sportsman. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



WHERE BIRD MEETS MAN UNAFRAID. 



(By W. A. DuPuy.) 

The Game Preservation Bureau of the national gov- 
ernment has created a common ground where the 
hunter and the hunted may meet in fellowship with 
no thirst for gore on the part of the one nor fear of 
death on the part of the other. Moreover, the two 
are taking advantage of the opportunity offered, and 
the wild things of the air are seen to partake of food 
from the hand of man in the open or to brazenly par- 
ade their young for his inspection. 

This condition of affairs comes about through 
the establishment of bird preserves of small areas in 
various parts of the country, the number of these 
having now increased to 15, ranging from Florida 
to Alaska. The word has gone forth in birdland of 
the nature, location and extent of these preserves 
and naturalists are astonished at the evidence that 
is given by the birds of their understanding of their 
rights when within the prescribed limits. 

In the District of Columbia, for instance, there 
is a regulation to the effect that quail may be shot in 
that section which lies below a given railroad bridge. 
Hunters complain that no sooner is a gun discharged 
in the fields outside of the preserve than every bird 
soars away beyond the bridge and that In the pro- 
tected section they are as careless of the presence 
of a man with a gun as of a cow. 

Pelican Island, on the east coast of Florida, is 
the nesting place of thousands of the birds from 
which it takes its name, and these are practically 
the pets of hordes of tourists that visit this con- 
gested bird metropolis every year. The preserve is 
but a sandbank of four acres, but is the seat of the 
only colony of pelicans on the east coast of Florida. 
Before it became a preserve in 1901 there seemed 
danger of the complete extermination of these birds. 
Collectors of quills for hat adornment would often 
visit the island and kill the pelicans by the score. 
Egg collectors would bear down upon it and carry 
away hundreds of specimens in a single day. Finally 
the state passed a law protecting the nongame birds 
and, in conjunction with the Audubon Society, the 
island was given protection. In 1903 the President 
by executive order, set aside the island as a bird pre- 
serve, and a warden was appointed as a federal of- 
ficer as well as a representative of the Audubon So- 
cieties. 

In the past few years the pelicans have increased 
prodigiously upon the island. Its surface is a mass 
of them and the show place of the winter resort sec- 
tion. The birds have come to realize their safety, and 
man creates less stir among them than he would in a 
barnyard. When persecuted at other points along the 
coast the pelicans are known to take up a residence 
upon the island and immediately assume the air of 
landed proprietors. 

Dr. A. K. Fisher, of the Game Preservation Bu- 
reau, reports that he recently personally witnessed 
Canadian geese and various specimens of ducks 
feeding from the hands of the keepers of Golden 
Gate Park in San Francisco. Thes were not birds 
that were regularly kept in the park, but untamed 
ones that had stopped for a few days in the course 
of their migrations. 

[During the shooting season canvasback, bluebills, 
spoonbills, sprig and odd representatives of other 
breeds are frequent visitors at Stow lake in the 
park. Mallards have bred with the Rouen ducks in 
the lake and every year broods of ducklings are 
noticed. Wild mallards breed in the "Chain of 
Lakes" and in all of the park waters the ubiquitous 
mudhen is seen in large flocks. All of these wild 
birds have become exceedingly tame and can be 
seen flocking to the grassy shores for their dole of 
tid bits and feed that visitors to the park find great 
pleasure in giving the birds. — Ed.] 

Similar conditions have been reported from the 
various preserves, the demonstrations of the devel- 
opment of friendship, being the more marked the 
longer the preserve has been guarded from the sports- 
man, thereby giving the birds an opportunity to de- 
velop a confidence in man. The evident tendency is 
to return to the conditions of Robinson Crusoe's 
island, where the animals and birds were reputed 
to be so unacquainted with man that they had not 
learned to fear him. Such conditions are further 
reported to the bureau to now exist in the Sandwich 
Islands by scientists who have visited them in re- 
cent years. The peculiar instance cited in this con- 
nection is the amusing, dancing albatross, which 
indulges in quadrille-like festivities, embracing much 
balancing to partners, bowing and swinging on the 
corner. These birds are not afraid of man, and if 
when he approaches he bows the bird will respond 
to his salute in kind. 

To the preserves that had been previously estab- 
lished have been added during the past year is Tern 
Island reservation, the home of the laughing gulls, 
at the mouth of the Mississippi; the Shell Key res- 
ervation and the East Timballer Island reservation, 
the latter formerly a military post, both off the coast 
of Louisiana, and frequented by pelicans, ducks and 
man-o'-war birds; the scenically beautiful Three 
Arch Rocks reservation, on the Oregon coast, fre- 
quented by California murres, the tufted puffin or 
sea parrot, cormorants, petrels and many other vari- 
eties, and finally the three reservations on the coast 
of Washington, inhabited by various birds and colo- 
nies of sealions. 

Breton Island reservation, at the mouth of the Miss- 
issippi, when taken in connection with the Audubon 
reservation, which adjoins it, is the geratest hatchery 
for ducks in the world. These islands were set aside 
as a game preserve by the President in October, 
1904. The action was taken upon receipt of reliable 



information showing that there was a definite plan 
on the part of certain hunters to devastate the island 
of its game. Plans had been made for the slaughter 
of 100,000 ducks during the winter that was begin- 
ning when the executive order was issued. On these 
islands it is now estimated that 100,000 terns arc 
bred each year in addition to many other kinds 
of ducks and other birds. All of these, including 
swarms of mallard ducks, that come down from the 
North, seem to recognize their safety on the islands 
and instinctively take refuge there. 

Another example of the conduct of feathered things 
upon a preserve where they are safe from hunters 
was recently oberved at one of the tourists hotels 
on the Indian River in Florida. For a mile around 
the hotel the shooting of game is prohibited. The 
wild ducks coming from the South seem to soon 
become aware of the fact that while it is the part of 
wisdom to take flight at the remotest approach of 
man outside of the protected area, they may swim 
freely all about the hotel. One enthusiastic hunter 
even induced a wild canvasback to swim up to the 
dock and eat bread from his hands. 

In Central Park, in New York, similar action has 
been observed on the part of the usually shy duck. 
A number of these are kept in the lake at the park, 
being prevented from flying away by having their 
wings clipped. Flocks that are passing overhead 
often light in the lake from seeing these decoys. 
They never stay longer than three or four days, but 
during that time become remarkably unafraid of 
man. A flock of them one day alighted on the pave- 
ment at the Fifty-ninth street entrance of the park 
in the midst of hurrying crowds of people and many 
of these were forced to take care that they did not 
step upon the ducks. Henry Oldys, of the Game Pre- 
servation Bureau, who is an eminent bird authority, 
witnessed this happening. 

The birds are also protected in such large game 
preserves as Yellowstone Park and the Wichita 
game preserve, in Oklahoma, which has been re- 
cently created with more than 2,000,000 acres of 
protected area. In the Yellowstone Park the proprie- 
tors of hotels are often forced to chase the grizzly 
bears away from their garbage barrels with clubs, 
and deer and antelope graze in broad daylight on 
the parade grounds of the government fort, and are 
not frightened away by the firing of the sunset gun. 
It is even asserted that a great grizzly once entered 
the lobby of a tourist hotel and insisted upon regis- 
tering, but this occurrence is not vouched for by 
the government bureau. 

Withal, however, it is asserted that there is coming 
to be a common ground where man and the so-called 
lower creatures may meet in friendship and harmony, 
with no danger of the spilling of blood, and smoke the 
peace pipe as they get better acquainted. 

o 

A WILD DUCK MONOPOLY. 



Without any malice in his heart, Assemblyman 
Melrose of Orange county has gone gunning after 
one of the aristocratic preserve clubs of Southern 
California, in a matter of peculiar interest to all 
hunters in that section. If he is successful the 
plebeian duck shooters of Los Angeles and adjoining 
counties will share many of the favors that now. 
under the law, seem to be heaped upon men who are 
able to pay hundreds of dollars for membership and 
dues in an exclusive organization. It is an echo ot 
the fight that has been waged for years between 
club members and the common or garden variety ot 
hunter. 

Constituents of Melrose have complained for 
months of a State game preserve in the vicinity of 
Balboa and Newport bay, which to all effects and 
purposes is maintained at public expense for the 
especial benefit of members of the San Joaquin Gun 
Club, made up of wealthy Los Angeles sportsmen. 

The Assemblyman is trying now to find a way 
whereby the general public may profit in kind. 

At the last session of the Legislature the State 
Fish Commission was empowered to create game 
preserves. One of its acts was to lease from James 
Irvine a large portion of the extensive San Joaquin 
ranch in Orange county, many acres of it being under 
water or marshy. Ducks and geese gather there by 
thousands and in the old days it was a great resort 
for hunters of all classes. 

It may be that the Commission was not aware of 
the fact that the game preserve thus created imme- 
diately adjoins the private grounds of the San Joaquin 
Gun Club, but it did not take the general hunting 
public long to make the discovery. 

The gun club apparenlly saw that it was likely to 
have a plague of ducks on its grounds, for it built a 
wire fence in the water separating its lands from 
the State preserve, the top wire being just above the 
surface of the water, while gun club signs abound. 

Any duck or goose that flew over the wire after 
seeing the signs surely would be a gone goose, but the 
club has absolved itself and is not to blame if mem- 
bers shoot the birds that get on the wrong side of 
the fence. 

It is a fine thing for the club. The game flocks to 
the preserve, immune while on State land and water 
from attacks from the hordes of hunters who roam 
the section in the open season. Then, foolish things, 
the birds wing in great flocks over the fence onto the 
gun club grounds, only to fall prey to the himrods 
with corduroy suits and $200 guns. 

The common hunter is barred from the preserve 
by wardens who guard its boundaries vigilantly and 
members only are permitted to hunt on the club 
grounds. 

Assemblyman Melrose is seeking a remedy for the 
situation and members of the Southern California 
delegation are aiding him. 



BULLETS IN SHOT GUNS. 

Most shotguns will shoot fairly accurately with 
ball, if the bullets fit the bore properly, and they 
can be generally depended on at short ranges — say 
up to 40 or 50 yards. The lightness and handiness 
of shot guns, our familiarity with their use for 
quick shooting, such as is often required n thick 
jungle, gives them a great advantage over rifles of 
any kind. The nearer a smooth bore barrel ap- 
proaches to a true cylinder, and the better the bullet 
fits it, the better the gun will shoot states a writer in 
The Indian Field. A good cylinder barrel, such as 
we find in most good class guns in the present day, 
with a tight fitting ball, will shoot into a six Inch 
circle every time at a hundred pards; but the ordi- 
nary shot gun of nominal 12 gauge which usually 
shoots a loose fitting 13 gauge bullet, cannot be abso- 
lutely depended on for more than about half this 
range. Its shooting, however, can be very much im- 
proved by a greased linen patch sewn on to the 
bullet which should have a couple of thick greased 
wads behind it. The patch and the wads almost en- 
tirely do away with windage and it is a really won- 
derful what a marked increase one finds in accuracy, 
for it is possible to group several shots in succession 
in a four inch ring at 50 yards. 

The ordinary shot gun charge of 3 drams of black 
powder drives a 13 gauge bullet at about 1,100 feet 
per second initial velocity. No doubt gunmakers 
can recommend a good nitro powder for ball in shot 
guns and give such directions for loading as will in- 
sure greater muzzle velocity and increased accuracy, 
while with comparatively small recoil, less noise and 
smokelessness we should secure still greater ad- 
vantages. 

These remarks are the outcome of a further ac- 
quaintance with the spherical "Lethal" bullet, in- 
troduced to this country by Messrs. Lyon and Lyon, 
and which has raised ridges crossing each other 
which enable it to fit the bore comparatively tightly 
and should vastly increase the precision and utility 
of the shot gun from which they are fired. The ridges 
are easily rubbed off so that the "Lethal" bullet can 
be quite safely used in guns with the fullest choke 
barrels and with the intersecting steel plates em- 
bedded within the structure of the bullet it expands 
on impact equal to the conical express as used in 
rifles with a charge of 3% drams of Schultze or its 
equivalent in DuPont. 

We have experimented with cylindrical shaped bul- 
lets for shot guns for some years — it is perhaps 
over thirty years since they were introduced — but 
though they have on a few occasions given satisfac- 
tory results, further experience has by no means 
confirmed the favourable reception we were inclined 
to give them. The theory sounds good enough; they 
are intended to give the ordinary smooth bore shot 
gun all the power and a good deal of the range of a 
rifle of the same calibre, but in practice they are fre- 
quently found to keyhole or topple over in flight 
while some of the examples of Belgian manufacture 
break up badly on impact even against thin skinned 
animals and seldom achieve what is claimed for them 
unless they enter a more than usually soft part even 
of such quarry. Also they have been known to break 
up dangerously while in flight, an instance having 
occurred at a tiger shoot in which we were taking 
part, when almost half of one of these hollow cylin- 
drical projectiles flew off at a tangent and actually 
struck the machan on the right of the shooter who 
shot at a bear crossing rather less than midway be- 
tween the two machans and at least thirty-five yards 
in front of both! The first bullet of this kind was 
brought out so many years ago that we have pre- 
served but a faint recollection of its points, but we 
remember it had holes running through it in a longi- 
tudinal direction and these holes were spiral in form; 
the passage of the air through these holes was in- 
tended to give them a spin similar to that imparted 
by the grooves of the rifle. The McLeod bullet of 
2>4 oz. weight, as advertised as far back as 1884, 
was of this pattern; in Sporting Firearms, Colonel 
F. Burgess, the well known expert, has some re- 
marks about it; he is no believer in the system. The 
most recent example of this bullet seen in India was, 
we think, the "rotary," which was ridged at the 
sides and had a sirocco-fan sort of arrangement in 
the central hollow which is said to impart the twist. 
Shortly after its appearance here we experimented 
with it, as did several friends, but want of oppor- 
tunity prevented the completion of the series of 
tests we had planned. These we have since been 
able to make and we find the promise of accuracy 
which we had at first been led to expect was not 
satisfactorily fulfilled, while the breaking up on 
impact, the keyholing, etc., were also present in a 
marked degree. But even if the accuracy of the 
hollow cylindrical bullet had been all that was de- 
sired, its penetration is defective and Its weight was 
certainly against it and the result, was undue recoil 
and a possibility of putting too great a strain on 
the gun, especially the light built weapons In vogue 
now. This bullet therefore appears to us to exhibit 
many of the disadvantages of those tried in the early 
eighties. Many sportsmen tender the opinion that 
the flat surface of the head of the bullet and the 
various devices for giving it a rotary flight are quite 
OppOMd to the chances of obtaining accurate shoot- 
ing and In this we are inclined to agree. Until some- 
thing much better turns up we shall expect to see 
the "Lethal" expanding spherical one? more than hold 
its own as the most popular and reliable for use in 
shotguns. 

o 

Drink Jackaon'i Napa Soda. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



TEACHING A BOY TO SHOOT. 



The age at which a boy may be taught the rudi- 
ments of rifle shooting varies very much. As in other 
directions one boy is sharper than another, so in 
shooting matters one will quickly learn to handle 
a weapon, while another will never show any aptitude 
for it. Keenness is the first thing to look for. In 
the case of a boy who happens to have a sporting 
father, uncle, or elder brother who is at the same 
time a "boy's man" the desire to play with an old 
gun and shoot will show itself at a very early age, 
and in such a case perhaps the best present that can 
be given is a light small-bore rifle says J. L. Sow- 
erby in the Field. Even at this stage a good deal 
may be taught. Pointing at any one must be firmly 
discouraged from the first. The importance of a 
quick and even pull off may be impressed. An oily rag 
will give a lot of amusement and incalculate habitual 
care of the rifle, though it cannot perhaps be expected 
at this stage of tuition that the weapon will never 
be left out on the lawn or elsewhere over night. The 
youngster will soon be trotting alongside his trainer 
for an evening stroll after rabbits or sparrow-thin- 
ning sorties in the garden, and may be allowed to 
press the trigger while his teacher does the aiming. 

Sooner or later the question of how this is done 
will crop up, and no amount of explanation and dia- 
gram drawing will convey this to the young mind 
half as quickly or well as will the old-fashioned plan 
of a course of aligning the sights of a rifle balanced 
on a bag of sand, meal, or something of that sort. 
The bull should be large and the range short — a 
3-inch bull at twenty yards will do very well — and 
let him be certain that the aim is absolutely true — 
and then explain the thing thoroughly. Then move 
the rifle and let the boy try his hand. The mechani- 
cal difficulty of the rifle moving back to its bed when 
left alone will cause trouble in his young hands, 
and the rifle will be handed over for examination in 
all sorts of weird positions, which can only be ac- 
counted for by the fact that the young mind has not 
yet grasped the necessity for a mathematically cor- 
rect alignment. A little patience will overcome this, 
and once the rifle is correctly aimed, the youngster 
seems to understand perfectly, anu will do it prop- 
erly as often as you like to insist. Nothing second 
rate should be passed. 1 think this is a point of the 
greatest importance. 

If a good pull off is not already taught, this will 
be the next point to master, by means of a 
course of snapping during which the lad should be 
encouraged to aim carefully as well as poll properly; 
in fact, the necessity for extreme care over every 
point, should be impressed on the boy from the first. 
The theory of aiming mastered, if the youngster 
seems to be taking pains a shot may be tried. Let 
the range be so short and the bull of such generous 
proportions that a miss is almost an impossibility. 
The bullseye is the bullseye to him, and size is of 
no account. Nothing encourages a youngster so 
much as the possession of a target with a few shots 
in the black, which will probably be fully explained 
several times over to every member of the house- 
hold. A hint to the teacher may not be out of place 
here — that a rifle needs to be very much oversighted 
to throw up into the center of a big bull at short 
range, that is, if the six o'clock aim is used. 

The rifle should be light, correctly sighted, and 
at least accurate enough to prove the soundness of 
your teaching. I am strongly opposed to the idea 
that any old rifle is good enough for a boy. An older 
beginner can look tolerantly on inaccuracy in his 
weapons, a boy cannot; and in my opinion nothing 
will undo all you have taught him more quickly than 
a rifle which does not repay him for his careful 
holding. The cartridge should also be light, to min- 
imize the risk of gun-shyness. Any nervousness 
is best dealt with in the time-honored way of the 
musketry instructor, by handing the boy the rifle 
without letting him know whether it is loaded or 
not. After a few pops he will steady down, and the 
rifle may be handed to him loaded. In all proba- 
bility he will score a bull, and confidence will be 
restored. 

I do not think any youngster is able to close one 
eye. Do not try to make him do so. I certainly 
think that two-eyed shooting should be encouraged, 
and that a man who habitually shoots with both eyes 
open has a decided pull over the one-eyed shooter. In 
a bad light it is no small advantage to have double 
the amount of light admitted to the optic nerve, and 
the shooter can also see a good deal of what is go- 
ing on "round the corner," which is lost to the man 
who closes the left eye — surely an advantage in 
warfare especially well worth keeping! 

o 

Jack Rabbits Galore. — Four Los Angeles hunters, 
H. Kissinger, E. Corneau, J. Westrem and H. West- 
rera in a two days' hunting trip near Palmdale, An- 
telope valley, bagged 200 jackrabbits. These nim- 
rods have been making weekly automobile excursions 
and fitted out with camping conveniences were en- 
abled to stay out several days. 

In an hour's time the first afternoon the bag 
counted twenty-five jacks. When they started last 
week, they expected to hunt for quail, but as none 
could be found in Los Angeles county, it was de- 
cided to go up the valley. Quail remained scarce, 
however. Rather than return without any game, the 
party started in quest of the rabbits, and notwith- 
standing the fact that several drives have been held 
in the vicinity during the winter, the game was 
plentiful. The one odd fact is that out of the large 
number killed only two were cottontails. John West- 
rem used a 22-caliber rifle, and killed several more 
than any of the others who used shotguns. 



SAN FRANCISCO STRIPED BASS CLUB. 



The tenth annual dinner of the San Francisco 
Striped Bass Club on Saturday evening, the 16th 
inst., was the occasion for a gathering of nearly 50 
jolly anglers, members and guests, who thoroughly 
enjoyed an evening replete with good fellowship, an- 
gling reminiscenses, stories, music and song, a 
night that will live long and pleasantly in the mem- 
ories of those present. The menu was under the 
experienced direction of John Bergez, a veteran ca- 
terer and a sportsman as well, needless to mention 
the oak was properly attended to from potage to 
small black. 

President Chas. P. Landresse was toastmaster 
during the evening and that means the functions of 
the chair were carried out in a genial and graceful 
manner most appropriate for a gathering of anglers. 

The feature of the evening was the presentation 
of trophies and prizes won during the past year by 
various members. James Watt, ex-president of the 
Califronia Anglers' Association, in well chosen and 
apt remarks, to which appropriate individual re- 
sponses were made, presented the medal to the an- 
glers whose names and season's record follow: 

Chas. P. Landresse, Ripley high hook medal, a 
beautiful and valuable specimen of the goldsmith's 
art, won by catching the largest striped bass, by a 
club member during 1908, weight 32% pounds, taken 
in Schell slough, near Wingo, Sonoma county, No- 
vember 29, 1908. 

Chris J. Johnson, first prize, second largest fish, 
24 % pounds. 

Will S. Turner, second prize, third largest fish, 
21 pounds. 

J. G. Bliss, third prize, fourth largest fish, 20% 
pounds. 

J. C. Wallace, fourth prize, fifth largest fish, 16 
pounds. 

Emil Acceret, fifth prize, sixth largest fish 15% 
pounds. 

Fred Franzen, sixth prize, seventh largest fish, 
13 pounds. 

Harold J. Ladd, Jr., seventh prize, eighth largest 
fish, 12% pounds. 

Ed. J. Conlin, eighth prize, ninth largest fish, 
11% pounds. 

J. G. Bliss won the "mysterious prize," donated 
by Chas. H. Kewell Co., under sealed conditions, 
which found the winner in the angler who caught the 
fourth largest striped bass. 

All prizes, save the high hook medal, were of ar- 
ticles used by and appreciated by anglers. 

Mr. Landresse announced a prize, valued at $10, to 
be given the club member with a record for the 
largest bass for 1909 caught with a spoon. 

Jas. S. Turner showed the assembly an interesting 
memento of the club's early years, the first club 
gold medal awarded, which was won by Chas. F. 
Breidenstein in 1900 for catching the largest bass, 
an 18 pounder. 

During the evening speeches were made by Messrs. 
Landresse, "Parson" Jackson, Draper, Breidenstein, 
Watt, Kewell, "Ammet" and others. "Billy" Hynes 
rendered several songs that were applauded vigor- 
ously. Frank Thompson sang a solo and told some 
laughable stories. Sam Wells' bass solo brought 
down the house. 

The record of prize striped bass listed above is one 
that will stand many years before it is beaten, be- 
sides this the club members have taken a great 
many other bass during the season. 

This club record has been beaten by a number 
of other anglers — the largest bass scaling 47 pounds. 
Striped bass annals during the past year bear the 
record notch for local waters. 

Among those present were: E. Acceret, J. Alten- 
dorf, F. Becker, J. G. Bliss, A. L. Bowley, Ed. J. 
Conlin, J. A. Cook, J. Dukel, F. Franzen, M. J. Geary, 
C. Johnson, C. H. Kewell, H. J. Ladd, Jr., C. P. Lan- 
dresse, L. F. Armknecht, Chas. F. Breidenstein, Jas. 
Watt, James Lynch, T. Lynch, James S. Turn- 
er, W. S. Turner, Frank Marcus, Prof. Oetz- 
man, P. Paulson, O. F. Thiele, Jos. Uri, J. C. Wallace. 
J. X. DeWitt, Frank Thompson, Frank O'Donnell, 
M. J. Hynes, Stewart Hynes, W. Bayles, Reinhold 
Jentsch and others. 

o 

Washington Rifle Tourney— The Seattle Rifle and 
Revolver Club at its annual meeting decided to hold 
a state rifle shoot on the club range here during the 
exposition next summer. The shoot will be open to 
all rifle teams in the state affiliated with the National 
Rifle Association. The Seattle Club will put up big 
cash prizes for the various events, including a $100 
prize for the best five-man team in the state, $50 for 
the man making the best individual score and $25 
cash prizes for the high man on each team entered. 
There will also be prizes for other events. 

The club plans to make the state shoot a feature 
of rifle work in the Northwest. Invitations will be 
sent to all the teams in the state to participate. The 
club also voted to change its plan and hold monthly 
meetings, commencing in February. 

In the annual election L. V. Newcomb was elected 
president; A. L. Head, vice-president; A. McBean, 
range officer; James Gibson, secretary; James R. 
Sterrett, treasurer. 

Eleven marksmen's buttons awarded by the Na- 
tional Rifle Association to men who qualified on the 
Seattle range last summer were distributed as fol- 
lows: A. McBean, A. H. Beebe, Roy R. Kerkow, L. 
V. Newcomb, F. W. Campbell, Capt. J. Howard Dar- 
lington, A. L. Head, James Gibson, W. C. Morse, H. J. 
Campbell and B. S. Burgess. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



Irish Terriers — Pete Walsh of Black Point, Marin 
county, the well known sportsman and trap shooting 
expert, has a bunch of Irish terriers that average 
far ahead of anything we have noticed in the breed 
for some time past. 

Muldoon, bred on the best blood lines of the breed, 
is as good a dog on varmints as the heart of the most 
ardent sportsman could wish. He is game to the 
core and has the scalps of many raccoons, skunks, 
etc., to his credit A son of Muldoon's, Lit- 
tle Muldoon, is a chip of the old block. Another 
seven-months'-old son, Tip O'Niel, is game and intel- 
ligent and will be a bench winner if he matures ac- 
cording to promise. Tim Dooley has acquitted him- 
self with honor at shows and is a workmanlike per- 
former on the ground. Mollie McCarthy is a fine 
brood bitch which has received deserved recogni- 
tion at past shows, she will soon be in whelp again. 
Peggy, another brood bitch, has whelped several lit- 
ters of excellent "Micks." 



Coast Show Dates. — The Northwest circuit will 
open with the Victoria Kennel Club show at Victoria. 
B. C, April 7 to 9, C. K. C. rules. Vancouver Ken- 
nel Club follows with three days, April 14 to 16, C. 
K. C. rules. Seattle Kennel Club, April 21 to 23. Ta- 
coma Kennel Club, April 28 to 30. Portland Kennel 
Club, May 5 to 7. 

It will be noticed that these shows are for three 
days instead of fouij, this arrangement will no 
doubt prove of advantage to both clubs and exhibitors. 

Pasadena has been reported ripe for a show next 
month. The San Francisco Kennel Club, it is re- 
ported, will hold a show in May, closely following the 
Oregon show. Oakland Kennel Club has arranged 
for a fall show. 



California Cocker Club. — The officers elected for 
the ensuing year are: Wm. Blackwell, president; A. 
L. Cresswell, first vice-president; Mrs. W. C. Ral- 
ston, second vice-president; Alex Wolfen, secretary- 
treasurer; J. Hervey Jones, Wm. Blackwell, Alex 
Wolfen, A. L. Cresswell, J. Leo Park, D. C. Brown 
and Mrs. F. E. Adams, executive committee. 

Mrs. W. C. Ralston, W. E. Chute, J. Hervey Jones 
and A. L. Cresswell are listed as the club official 
judges for 1909. 

The club members are looking forward enthusiasti- 
cally to a representative exhibition of cockers on the 
Coast this season. 



San Francisco Kennel Club.— The following officers 
were elected for 1909: William Ellery, president; 
H. B. Blatchley, vice-president ; Dr. L. W. Spriggs, 
secretary. A meeting of the club was held last 
week during which the club was reorganized. 

Preparations are under way for a premier show 
this year. Mr. James Mortimer will preside in the 
ring. Present indications point to a successful 
show from start to finish. 

o 

Close Season on Quail Advocated. — The growing 
scarcity of the game valley quail in many sections 
of California has frequently, of late, prompted the 
suggestion that a remedy could be found in a close 
season for a greater or less period. A recent issue 
of the San Rafael Independent has the following: 

"The Supervisors of Marin county should close 
the season for quail in Marin county for at least two 
years. This appears to be the honest opinion of the 
hunters of the county, who are anxious to uphold 
legitimate sport. As matters stand today, the quail 
are almost exterminated in the county. What quail 
do exist are driven back to the thickly wooded dis- 
tricts inaccessible to hunters. 

We discussed the mater with three members of 
the Board of Supervisors and we feel that the Board 
will take action on the matter at their next meeting. 
Then again, the hunters of the county should hold 
a meeting and send resolutions to the State Fish 
Commissioners, asking that steps be taken to pro- 
tect game in the county. Hunters from San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland hunt in Marin county. Still the 
Fish Commissioner takes no steps to protect our 
game. It would be a wise move on the part of the 
Commission to plant a new variety of quail in the 
foothills of the county, while the season is closed in 
order to give them time to accumulate. Something 
must be done, otherwise quail hunting in our county 
will soon be a thing of the past. 

It would also be a wise move on the part of the 
Supervisors to set apart one day in the year for a 
varmint hunt and offer prizes to those producing 
the most birds or animals. More quail are destroyed 
by hawks and blue jays than from any other cause." 
o 

Wild Dogs Attack Hunters — A couple of Tempe 
hunters, lately returned from a hunting trip into the 
bottoms of the Gila river, twenty miles below Phoe- 
nix, state that they were attacked by a band of wild 
dogs, led by an animal as large as a mastiff. It is 
believed that the band was established by outlaw 
dogs from the nearby ranches. The hunters were 
followed to the edge of the thick river underbrush, 
but no farther. 

o 

The Stump Lake reservation, in North Dakota, four 
islands containing 28 acres were set aside in 1905, 
and it has been already observed that it furnishes a 
haven of refuge for the birds of the whole section 
during the season of open shooting. Whenever the 
hunters become too numerous the birds resort to 
the islands, evidently appreciating their safety there 
and remaining until the danger is passed. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



Twenty-Seventh Auction 



Annual Winter Sale 

OF THE 

CHICAGO 

HORSE SALE COMPANY 

Commencing 

ONDAY 





Washington's Birthday 

anil Continuing 

SIX FULL DAYS 



REPRESENTATIVE LOTS 

Head The Peter the Greats 



From PATCHES WILKES STOCK FARM, Lexington, Ky. 



ad The Grattans 



i 

Head 

From (5KATTAN STOCK FARM, Liberty villa, 111. 

Head The RedMediumS 

From MAPLE GROVE STOCK FARM, Indiimola. 111. 

.il. The Sidney Dillons 

From MAYWOOD STOCK FARM, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Head The Oakland Barons 

From Hl'DSON RIVER STOCK FARM, Poughkeepsie. N. Y. 

Head ^ Baron Poseys 

From PHILLIPS STOCK FARM. Delovan. Wis. 

Hea°d 5? Greystones 

From GRASSLANDS FARM. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Head The Strong'woods 

From STRONGWOOD FARM. Kalamazoo, Mich. 
MORE NEXT WEEK. 



\ PEW OF THE KM). 

Admyre 

Four-year-old filly by Admiral 
Dewey. Paced last year in 2:1114. 

Czarina Eliza 

Crack three-year-old Peter the 
Great trotter, trial, 2. 2:2\Y*. 

Nick Douty 

Wonderfully fast pacer. Full 
brother to sensational 
Charley Hayt. 

Allerton's Echo 

Grand two-year-old trotter, by 
Allerton. Kvery dam a producer. 

Moving Van 

Two-year-old brother to Moving 
2:10%, last season's wonder. 

Sonoma Dillon 

Four-year-old trotter by Sidney 
Dillon, out of Sonoma Girl's dam. 

Margaret Phelps 

Clasdy three-year- old trotter by 
Boreal. Trial. 2, 2:21 '/ 4 . 

Nabai 

Three-year-old trotter by Moko 
and from The Harvester family. 

Mighty A. 

Two-year-old trotter by Mighty 
Onward, out of Margaret O's dam. 

Mike Audubon 

Two-year-old brother to Will Be 
Sure. A great prospect. 

Prince Axworthy 

Phenomenal two-year-old trotter, 
by Axworthy; dam by 



Growing Daily. 



lied King; 'i:W7Vi 

Belle c 2:0itvi 

Dr. Hook 2:10 

Queen llee 2ill>4 

Black Dooslaa -:i2'i 

Oxur (w) 2:13 

Western lilrl 2:13'/, 

Don Muscovite ItlSVi 

tin Cameron 2:13 Vi 

■Ted I 2:14V« 

Raymond P 2:14V, 

Clole union 2: 1 I 

BbBby Gonld i i • , 

Mian Madlaon In) . .2:15 

Hlaaonrl Boy SilBM 

TJie Scamp 2tlB% 

Bxqnlalte 2:l."5V4 

Bine Peter 2:l(l 

>Hsm Evelyn 2:10'/, 

Prlnceaa of Itorneo ..2:17 l /i 

*be Miller 2:17% 

Ojsnr 2:18V4 

Lillian Arnold 2:1IM/, 

MIhh Brooks 2:11>'/, 

Mrtu.t 2:ll»'/, 

ITlscillu 2:1»V, 

Aneaa G 2:20'/, 

lllnck Spider 2:21 •/, 

Moan Bella, 3 2.21V, 

Hon Bow Bella 2:25 

MIks MmllNon 2:25% 

Tar Baity 2:241% 

Jim Swift 2:27M. 

UuUcne, 2 2:27% 

The Intruder 2:2S>/, 

Annie Mae 2:21»>/, 

Nnpton'a Pride 2:2!l"4 

TeleiiiiichiiM 2:30 

Martha Manpln, 3 2:30 



QUILENE 



Is No. I in the Catalog 

A grand young mare (bred like L. 
Maud 2:0734) that Lu Green worked last year in 2:12%. 
Then comes the other twenty-five head from Maple Grove 
Farm 

The Red Mediums 

Individually and collectively the best lot of colt trotters ever 
offered at auction. No sale ever started its catalog with 
choicer offerings. Bear in mind the hour and day. 

1 o'clock P. M. MONDAY, February 22, 1909. 



Meritorious Consignments of Ready-to-Race Kind 
from 



V. L. SCHULER, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

C. B. MICHAELS, 

Topeka, Kan. 



E. S. GONE, 

Sandwich, III. 

A. W. HOLMES, 

Exira, la. 



WM. SCHERFFIUS, J. G. WIL8RAHAM, 



Evansville, Ind. 



Indianapolis, Ind. 



A. H. PENDLETON & SON ^b^K°nert uthefrentireraciI1 " 

S. J. FLEMING & SON, of Torre Haute, have a grand lot for 
this sale. Race winners and prospects. 

Dave G. McDONALD, of Pittsburg 

Heads his carload of matinee stars with the good trotter OZAR. 

GEORGE J. THOMAS ^T^^K^" ,ar,oad ofroc " 

H. N. MURPHY, of Calesburg, III., is preparing to send 
a load of fresh speed — warranted first-class. 



Catalog Ready Feb. 12th 

Will contain the most attractive lot of 
consignments ever offered in the West. 
We invite correspondence in request of 
catalog, or relating to any of the con- 
signments. 



| SIX DAYS ONLY g 

Chicago 



herefore Send Us Your Entries To-Day. Don't Delay. Early consignments procure not only the 
all-important benefits of early and continued publicity, but also choice of catalog order, an applied advantage 
>iiich we are only too glad to extend if given the opportunity. The demand for all classes of choice offerings 
will be unprecedented. Write us for entry blanks, addressing 



PALMER L. CLARK, 

President. 
W. W. VAN ZANT, Vice-I'res. 



HORSE SALE 

Union Stock Yards, Chicago 



Company 



FRANK P. KENNEY, 

Secretary. 
MAGNUS FLAWS, Treas- 




THE CHEAP STEER DOMINANT. 



"Looks as though the country is in 
the throes of penury," remarked a cat- 
tle feeder as he gazed ruefully on a 
load of big steers, of which he hap- 
pened to be the owner, in the Chicago 
yards the other day. His consignment 
had been priced by the salesman at 
$7.25 to one buyer after another, but 
each in his turn announced that he 
was looking for something costing less 
than $6. When the big cattle had 
been warded early in the morning ad- 
jacent pens had been full of the $5 and 
$5.75 kinds, but were depopulated long 
before noon, a steady procession of 
them marching toward the scales 
while the market landscape was still 
profusely decorated with sticky droves 
of big stuff. In buying circles there 
was perhaps harmony of demand for 
something cheap and light. Even ex- 
porters were conducting a still hunt 
for the 5y 2 cent steer and the man 
who had put his corn into long-fed 
product there and then registered a 
"never again" vow. 

Current demand for cheap cattle and 
light cuts merely indicates the deter- 
mination of the consumer to get away 
from expensive purchases. Even the 
buyer of high-class beef wants to ex- 
pend the smallest sum possible for a 
roast or a steak, consequently fat year- 
lings are outselling weighty cattle of 
equal quality right along. But the sur- 
prising phase of the trade has been 
the alacrity with which steers selling 
in the $5 to $5.75 classes have re- 
sponded to diminished supply and ef- 
fectively resisted breaks. 

Last week when big cattle were 
slumpy and neglected action could be 
had on all light stuff and the more 
quality It had the better it sold. Buy- 
ers never overlook dressing sheet pos- 
sibilities. 

The moral to the feeder is obvious. 



A few big cattle will always be needed, 
but the demand for them will grow 
less as time works along. When a 
scrub steer in the 4-cent class goes 
to the scale early in the day, while 
the fat bullock with quality cannot 
elicit a bid, market needs are not 
hard to get acquainted with. The 
American people want a package, the 
price of which is not prohibitive, and 
the era of small families in urban 
this demand has been accentuated by 
communities and the development of 
the minature flat method of existence. 
Increased cost of distribution is also 
a factor in shaping popular demand. 
New York and Chicago retailers assert 
that carcass cost of beef is the factor 
of least inffuence in fixing their 
charges to consumers. Rents, labor 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's -«v 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



For 

healini 

the 



-It il penetrat 



ng,l 



1!, 



hauling, and for all Old 
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Woundi, F.lone, 
txterlor Cancan, Boil, 

Human B "n n 'o"„ n . 4 

CAUSTIC BALSA M haa 
a. r ,.l a. 
Liniment. 



Body ! 



We would say to all 
who buy il thai il does 
not contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ei 
ternal use. Persistent 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Perfectly Safe 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
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and 
all Stiff Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

Cornhill, Tel.— "One botUs C.u.ilo B«l««m did 

my 1 1 at mora food than ♦ 1 JO 00 paid in 

doctor'. bill! " OTTO A BKVKR. 

Price i I .BO par bottle. Sold by d miniate, or lent 
bjuieipreee prepaid. Write (or Booklet R. 

The LAWRENCE -WILLIAMS COMPANY. Cleveland, 0. 



(now high under union regulations), 
and cost of delivery, are what con- 
cern them most. A small roast or 
steak is called for by a dozen custo- 
mers where the needs of one require 
heavy beef. — Chicago Breeders Ga- 
zette. 



"1TECT0B" "IMFOBTED" "EOTAL HE3T0B" 

Green Label, 




The Original Egyptian " 



For Lame Horses 

For curb, splints, spavin, wind puffs, sprains or swell- 
ings of any kind, use Tuttle's Elixir, insults are 
quick and permanent. Tens of thousands of farmers, 
tlie owners of great city stables, the race horse men, 
all swear by 

Tuttle's Elixir 

Best for colic, distemper and founder. Also makes 
the- most effective leg and body wash. 

Only 50 cents a bottle at all deal- 
ers. Keep Tuttle's Worm I'owdera, 
Condition Towders and lioofOlnt- 
ment on hand also. If not at your 
dealers, we'll ship by express. 

Valuable Veterinary Book Free. 
Write for a copy today. Full of 
important pointers to every horse 

owner, a loo-pni/© ll.n0tn.ted 
guide free, but It Is worth dollars. 

Tuttle's Elixir Co. 

52 Beverly St.. Boston, Mast. 

Willis A. Shew, Los Angeles, Cat. Am. 





Zolock 2:052 Re6N ° 



34471. 



Terms: 
$75. 

Retain 
privilege 



2M% 



•isnVi voiox - - •i\nY A 

2:07% lloton de Oro2:NrW 
2:0754 McO. D. - - 'l:\VA 



McKinncy's Fastest Entire Son 



Sire of 

Sherlock Holmes 2 :(Xi K. Amhush 
Bystander - 
Delilah - - 
Josephine - 

H others in 2:80 
By McKinney J ll 1 .,. (lam. the (Trent brood 

mare, Gazelle 2:11% 
Will make the Season of 1909 at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

For further particulars apply or address 
N. S. YOUNG, University Station, Los Angelee 



C. F. MOREL 



Successor to 



J. O'KANE CO. 



Sbcldon IiuildiiiK, !■">" Market St., San Francisco, Oil. 

A Full Line of Highest Grade Harness. Turf and 
Leather Goods. 

Everything In Horse Toggery, 

Agent for WilcoxHon's Perfection Liniment — $2 a bottle. Campbell's 
and all otber well-known remedies. Local orders given prompt at- 
tention. LVmeml>er the new addre ss. 



G. F. MOREL, Successor to J. O'KANE CO., 



Sholdon Building, 
457 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



It's a great thing to know how to 
drive a team right. In teaching the 
boys to drive show them that it is not 
necessary to jerk the reins, or yell at 
the horses, or use a whip except in 
extreme cases to prevent frightened 
animals from balking. Gentleness 
and firmness are about the only qual- 
ifications to make a good driver. Keep 
a taut rein, a good temper, and study 
your animals. The rest is easy. 

Now is the season when the roads 
and weather are nice for driving, and 
the farmer's wife need not forget this 
pleasure for fear of meeting an auto- 
mobile. This summer these machines 
are more numerous than ever, but 
there have been fewer accidents. 
Country horses are becoming used to 
the machines, so there is no excuse 



FOB SALES, 

no.v hk»;i\ Al.no, three-year-tfld rec- 
ord 2 : 1 5 3 4 , handsome brown colt by On 
Stanley, dam Belle Kaymon by Raymon. 
He was one of the best colts on the 
Coast last year. He started in three 
races, was twice first, second once and 
sot his record in the Breeders' Futurity 
Stake at Chlco. trotting the last quarter 
in 30^ seconds, last eighth in 15 sec- 
onds. He Is going fine, and In the 
opinion of the best horsemen that have 
seen him, will trot a mile in 2:09 or bet- 
ter this year. 

MAC O. I>. 2:11% by Zolock, dam 
Kentucky Belle. Mac O. D. will pace in 
2:05 or better this year. One of the 
best going pacers on the Coast and has 
a great future as a race horse. Goes 
without straps. 

lllri.l.l: HAVMON (dam of Don Reg- 
inaldo <S) 2:15%, Col. Green, trial 
2:10% to wagon), bay mare by Raymon 
1300?, dam Gipsy by Gen. Booth, son of 
Geo. M. Palchen, etc. Standard and 
registered. In foal to On Stanley, sire 
of Don Reginaldo. 

1,11.1 I \\ WKI.HOItN. dam of Lillian 
Zolock, two-year-old matinee record 
2:17%. She Is in foal to Oh So, son of 
Nutwood 600. 

Both of the above mares are entered 
and paid up on in the Breeders' Futur- 
ity Stakes. 

\UI7.o\ V McKINNEY, brown filly, 
two years old, by R. Ambush, dam Hytu 
by Happy Prince. Entered and paid up 
on in Breeders' Futurity, Stanford and 
Occident Stakes. 

All of the above horses are standard 
but .Mac O. D. 

For price and particulars, address 

DR. F. A. RAMSEY, Riverside, Cal. 



FOR BALE. 

Dave Hynn S3S-1I. Race record 2.13. 
trial 2:07. Mahogany bay stallion, 15% 
hands high, weight 1100. Sired by An- 
teo'o. he by Antevolo 2:19% : dam Ma- 
bel, own sister to Beautiful Bells, 
world's greatest brood mare. 

Dave Ryan's dam was Network by 
Keho 4(12, sire of the dam of Direct 
2:05%: second dain Nettie by Nutwood 
2:18'/,: third dam F.mhlem. grand dam 
of Arion 2:07% and Flying Jib 2:04; 
fourth dam. Young Portia by Mambrino 
Chief 11. 

With opportunity and in the right 
man's hands, this bor-Je woul 1 rr.ake 
a great sire. Address 

A. EDSTROM. 
1308 52d 1TC, Oakland. Cat 



FOB SALE. 

Mluibli. Hal. foaled June 3. 1907. One 
of the best bred pacing colts in this 
country a combining the blood of Diablo 
2:09^ and ihe famous old Tom Hal 
1G934, grand sire of Star Pointer 
1:6PM- This colt is a splendid individ- 
ual and is entered in the Breeders' Fu- 
turity. He is in training and shows 
fast. Any information regarding this 
bolt. Address 

\. EDSTROM. 
UMM SSSd are., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Four-year-old brown horse; no white. 
About 15.2 hands and weighs aDOut 1050 
pounds. A pacer, sound, and has no 
blemishes. Worked a mile last year 
in June in his three-year-old form in 
2:14 and can step an eighth in 15 sec- 
onds any time In condition. Sired by 
Searchlight, first dam Bee Sterling 
(d im of 4 in the list and 3 others with 
trials from 2:12 to 2:18). second dam 
Flash (dam of 5 in ihe list, etc.). No 
better bred pacer; should race in 2:10 
or better this year or pay for himself 
in the stud. For full particulars and 
price, address 

I.. I). 1)1 DLE1 . Dixon, Cal. 



STANDARD STALLION FOB SALE. 

\E\KWAY 44272. handsome bay 
stallion, 8 years old, stands 17 hands, 
and weighs 1400 pounds. By Nearest 
32 r >62 (sire of Highfiy 2:04\4, Alone 
2:09V,. etc.) by Nutwood Wilkes 22116, 
dam Camma by Norway 5325, next 
dam Camilla by Ky. Prince, third dam 
('amille by Hambletonian 10. As an 
Individual he cannot be beaten and his 
breeding is the most fashionable. For 
particulars address 

T. W. HAH S IOW. San .I«*e. Cal. 

Phone Black 2841. 



For Sale. 

in ii in DIRECT, pacer, blk. stallion, 
6 years old, 16 hands. Sired by Chan. 
Derby 2:20. First dam by Direct 2:05%. 

Second dam by Echo, sire of dam of 
Direct 2:05%. 

This is a handsome, well-made horse 
and a fast natural pacer. Was worked 
a little as a three-year-old and stepped 
a mile in 2:19, last quarter in :31. 
Myrtha W., the only one of his foals 
ever trained, paced a half in 1:09 as a 
two-year-old. Can be seen at the 
Pleasanton race track at any time. 
For further particulars and price, 
write 

E. S. PARKER, 

IMenKiinton, Cal. 

TWO BROOD MARES FOR SALE 

Twenty-third, trotter (dam of the 
great Sterling McKinney 2:06% that 
sold last year for |35,000) by Director 
2:17, dam Nettle Nutwood (dam of 
Hillsdale 2:15) by Nutwood 2:18%, sec- 
ond dam by Ethan Allen Jr. 2903, third 
dam by Williamson's Belmont. Twenty- 
third is in foal to Alconda Jay. 

Alta \oln 2:20, pacer, by Altamont 
3600, dam Nola (dam of Phoenix 
2:15%), by Nutwood 2:18%, second 
dam Belle Byron (dam of Claus Almont 
2.26%), by Bowman's Clark Chief, third 
dam Belle Hook by Almont 33, fourth 
dam by Bay Chief, fifth dam by Davy 
Crockett. 

Both the above mares are standard 
and registered, and are in fine order. 
I only offer these mares for sale be- 
cause my small farm is becoming over- 
stocked and I have their miles to breed 
from. They will be sold very reason- 
able. For prices and further particu- 
lars, address 

O. II. WILLIAMS, 
Boa 151, Palo Alto, Cal. 

Two Standard Bred Stallions FOR SALE. 

Out- by ChnrlcM Derby, six years old, 
has paced miles In 2:12%, first-class 
individual, thoroughly broken, kind 

to drive. 

One by McKinney, weighs 1250 
pounds, high-class and handsome ani- 
mal in every respect. 

The dams of both of the above horses 
are registered for three generations 
back and are producers of speed. These 
two stallions are not only highly bred, 
but desirable animals in every respect. 
Will be sold cheap. For full particulars 
as to breeding, etc., address A. G. 
SHIPPEE, 247 W. Fremont St., Stock- 
ton. Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Bay pacing gelding by Sidney Dil- 
lon, dam by Director. Das been a mile 
in 2:17. half in 1:03, and quarter in 29 
seconds. 

Brood mare by Antevolo. dam by 
Thad Stevens, next dam by Whipple's 
Hambletonian. In foal to Chestnut 
Tom and nominated in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity Stake No. 9. For further in- 
formation, apply to or address 

T. D. SEXTO If, 
1804 Market St.. Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Hay gelding, 6 years old, 16 hands, weighs 1200 
lbs., by Monterey 2:no l <». dam I.ady (irosvenor by 
Groayenor 1883. Kind, gentle and sound, can be 
driven by a lady, and will work single nnd 
double. Price. $2. r >0. Apply to 

DR. A. .1. RYDBEKG. San Rafael. 

WANTED. 

A servieeably sound, well-broke road horse, 
that has some speed. Limit price, $250, 

Send description and price to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
Box 447. San Francisco. 

Good Ones for Sale. 

Standard and registered stallions by McKin- 
ney, brood mares, high-class roadsters and colts 
at very reasonable prices. I am closing out all 
my horses at private sale. Am offering some of 
the best bred and best individuals on the Coast. 
Write for particulars. Address. 

THOMAS SMITH, 

1021 Georgia St.. Vallejo, Cal. 

Percheron Stud Colts for Sale. 

The undersigned offers for sale two high-grade 
Percheron-N'orman draft yearling stud colts, a 
black and a bay. weighing respectively 1370 and 
1420 pounds. For prices and particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davis, Cal. 

THRHH STALLIONS TO LEASE. 

One son and two grandsons of McKin- 
ney 2:11%. all out of gilt-edge dams. 
These stallions are all 16 hands, of good 
color, and each has fine large colts to 
show. They will be leased for the 
stud season of 1909 on liberal terms, but 
lessees will be required to give satis- 
factory security. For terms and pedi- 
grees, address 

A. B. RODMAN, Owner, 
Woodland, California. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



Welg-he 1,000 pounds. Is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 
9. B. WRIGHT, 

Santa Rosa, Cal. 



FAIRMONT 
Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The most superbly situated Ho- 
tel In the world — overlooking 
the Bay of San Francisco and 
City. 

Headquarters Army and Navy. 
The Social Center of City. 
Convenient to Business and 
Theater Sections. Reached by 
street cars from every direction. 
Only 5 minutes from ferry. 
Single Room with Bath, $2.50, 

$3, $3.50. $4. $5, $6. $7. $10. 
Suits with Bath, $10.00 upwards. 

Under Management of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

John C. Klrkpatrlck, Manager. 

"HOWARD SHORTHORNS "-QUINTO 
HERD. — 77 premiums, California State 
Fairs 1902-3 -4. Registered cattle of 
beef and milking families for sale. 
Write us what you want. 
HOWARD CATTLE CO., San Mateo. 



GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-GLIDE 

FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 
Glide Grade — % French and V4 Spanish 
Merino. 

— Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams. — 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 297, Home Telephone, 
Sacramento, Cal. Dixon, Cal. 



W. MGGINBOTTOM 

LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office with E. Stewart & Co. 
297 Valencia St., S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

WANTED. 



A thoroughly experienced young man wishes a 
position as instructor at a riding academy, or 
with stock farm breaking and tilting polo ponies. 

Address, W. C. care of Breederand Sportsman. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers la PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall St Co., Portland, Oregon. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 
— In— 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artistic Designing. 
141 Valencia St. San Francisco. 

STUD BOOKS FOR SALE. 

The first four volumes of Hruce's Ameri- 
can Stud Book, elegantly bound in 
Morocco, will be sold cheap for cash or 
exchanged for later volumes. 
Address this office. 

BREEDER snd SPORTSMAN. 

STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

Owing to the death of my husband— Mr. David 
Bryson— I have for sale a Clydesdale stallion 
(Buffalo Bobl eight (SI years old; weighs 2(J<l(l 
lbs. when in good tlesh. 

Also a standard bred trotting stallion (Have 
McKinney). 7 years old. weighs 1100 lbs. Sired 
by(iuy McKinney. Registered No. 3K7HH. Both 
horses are sound and gentle, good dispositions 
and breed well. 

MRS. M. K. BRYSON, 

Linden. San Joaquin Co.. Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Meribet, Standard and Registered. Vol. lfi. A.T.R. 

Bay mare, 10 hands, seven years old. by 
Owyhee (Rec. 2:11), out of Inex (dam of Our 
Jack 2:13%. Owynex 2:22%, and Alamo2:2!>X>> by 
Sweepstakes. Broken, but used mainly for 
brood mare. Her two foals by LynwoodW.are 
very promising. Price, if gold before being bred, 
$.!00. C. B. WAKEFIELD. 

1521 19th St.. Sacramento, Cal. 



RACING! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

OAKLAND RACE TRACK 



First Race at 1:40 p. m. 

Six or more races each week day, 
rain or shine. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 20 
minutes until 1:40 P. M. No smoking 
in the last two cars, which are re- 
served for ladies and their escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes. 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated eases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 
IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

620 Octavia St., between Fulton and Grove, 
Phone Special 2074. San Francisco, Cal 

WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

I inn Golden Gate Art. 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster and 
Chestnut Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

RUBEKOII) ROOFING. 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
BONESTEI.Ii & CO., 
118 to 124 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 

JOHN BARDUHN 

Successor to Kavanagh & Barduhn 

THE PALACE HOTEL TAILORS 

has removed to his permanent quarters 
No. 7 Sutter St., near Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 



Seldom See 

a ble knee like this, but your bona 
may have a bunch or bruUe on bla 
Ankle, Hock, Stifle, Knee or Throat. 




^JJSORBINE 



will clean them off without laying the 
horse ui>. No blister, 110 Iiair gone. 
S2.00 per bottle. dellv'd. Book 8 D free. 
A lisoKitIN K, JR., for mankind, $1. 
Remove! Painful Swellings. Enlarged Glands, 
Goitre, Wens. Bruiiies, Varicose Veins, Varicos- 
ities, Old Sores. Allays Pain. Book free. 
W f. YOUNG, P.D.F., 54 Monmoulh St., Springfield. Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. ; Woodward, Clark St, Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



/ 



„n COPAIBA 



At 



WW 

CAPSULES 



Z 

I 0) 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THI BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



for not taking the wife and youngsters 
visiting town and neighbors. 

Rust is the great enemy of steel 
and iron, and yet it does not eat up 
as much of the farm implements as it 
did prior to the introduction of axle 
greese. Axle greese is the panacea 
for rust, and is an ever-present help. 
All it needs is someone to make the 
application. Rust eats like a mort- 
gage, which has an appetite like a 
buzz-saw. 




Why does "Save-the-Horse" so dis- 
tinctively dominate over firing, blister- 
ing and every remedy and method 
known to veterinary practice? Why! 
because on any and every case of 
any account, the kind where all other 
methods fail, it proves to be the only 
remedy that has the potential proper- 
ties and power to consummate the de- 
sired result. Nearly everything made 
will cure some cases, but what are they 
compared with the cases "Save-the- 
Horse" cures? Whether the case is an 
old. a new or a serious, complicated 
case considered beyond hope, in using 
"Save-the-Horse" you are not fritter- 
ing away time and money. 

BEAR ALSO IX HIND — A SIGNED 
CONTRACT GOES WITH 
EVERY BOTTLE. 




PONCA CITY, Okla., 12-4-08. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

DEAR SIRS: — I have mailed you to- 
day a photograph of "Mayflower," my 
high-class show mare and trotter; first 
prize winner at International Horse 
Show, Kansas City. Then made a 
start at Udall, Kans., 2:28%, with less 
than thirty days' work. 

When she came home from Kansas 
City she had a bad bowed tendon and I 
thought she would never be of any 
account for speed or showing and 1 
bred her to Symboiler. I saw your ad- 
vertisement of "Save-The-Horse." I 
sent and got a bottle and began using 
it, and she improved so fast that I 
began working her in August, and com- 
menced racing her the middle of Sep- 
tember. Gave her the mark of 2:28%, 
and during this time three-quarters of 
a bottle of "Save-The-Horse" cured her 
sound and well. I have been asked by 
horsemen what I used and 1 told them. 
This mare is known by a great many 
horsemen in Kansas City and Okla- 
homa. I shall never be without "Save- 
The-Horse." Respectfully, 

WM. CRAVENS. 

Coliingswood, N. J., Nov. 20, 1908. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Gentlemen:— The "Save-the-Horse" I 
bought completely cured the bone 
spavin and splint. I was greatly 
pleased with the result, as I was very 
much discouraged before trying your 
treatment. JOHN LINGO. 

Franklin, N. H., Nov. 23, 1908. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 
Gentlemen: — I used your "Save-the- 
Horse" on a bone spavin of long stand- 
ing and made a complete cure. 

WARRUN F. DANIEL. 



"Save-the-Horse" permanently curea 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpln, 
splint, shoe boll, wlndpuff, Injured ten- 
dons, and all lameness, without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 

$5 Per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as 
the best legal talent could make It. 
Send for copy and booklet. 

At Drugglxta and Dealers or Expreu 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Formerly Troy N. Y. 
D. K. NEWELL, 
50 Bayo VUta Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



Lice 



Sample FREE 



(Write for It.) 



IT WILL DO THE WORK AND 
YOD WILL WANT MORE. 

TOBACCO DUST 

A positive and recognized remedy for 
poultry lice. The acknowledged sure 
ingredient for sheep dip. (iuaranteed 
full strength, absolutely fresh, and 
as good as any in any market. 

Sure death to lice on 

HORSES, SHEEP, POULTRY, 

and all other kinds of live stock. 

Quotations f. o. b. San Francisco. All 
shipments may he returned within L0 
days and your money refunded if our 
Dust does not please you in every way. 
Samples mailed postpaid upon request. 

In 100 lb. lots, only 4'oC. per lb. 
In 300 " " " 4c. " " 
In 500 " " " 3%c. " " 

Send a postal and get sample 
Tobacco Dust and our three com- 
plete new catalogues postpaid. 

It pays to buy by mail for cash. 
Our prices are the lowest Cut Rates 
and we prove it. 

The Owl Drug Co., 

Mail Order Dept., 611 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

Mention this paper. 



KENDALLS SPAVIN CURE 



FHIENB OF THE HORSE 

No other remedy so pure and speedy for 
Curb, Splint, Ringbone, Spavin, Lameness. 

"I have used your Spavin Cureand found 
It the greatest horse medicine I have ever 
Been." W. A. Varney, Canada, Ky. 

World's greatest liniment for man and 
beast. At all druggists. S I a Battle; 6 tor 

S5. Get the genuine. The great book, 
"Treatise on the Horse," free at drug 
etores, or write 

Dr. B. J. Kendall Co., 
Enosburg, Falls, 
-4 Vt. 



BUILT FOR. BUSINESS 



CARTS 



ELEGANT NEW 
CART CATALOGUE 
NOW READY 




J.J.DEAL&S0N 

JON ESVILLE. MICH. 



BAKER & HAMILTON, Agts. 

SAN FRANCISCO, SACRAMENTO AND 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




THE ARABIAN STALLIONS 



WILL 
STAND THE 

SEASON 

at 



Introductory Offer to Breeders: $50 



Mares sent for and accommodated at foaling time. 

Write for particulars to 



EL RANCHO DE LAS ROSAS DESERT ARABIAN STUD, 



The FOUNDATION BLOOD OF 
ALL GOOD HORSE STOCKS 



thoroughbred and standard bred 
in every case trace back to it. 
Even the Mustang owes liis en- 
durance to the Arab strain. The 
A ra b gi ves speed over long dis- 
tances, draft power, bottom, do- 
cility, intelligence, beauty of 
coat and conformation. The 
half-Arab is an ideal combin- 
ation saddle and driving horse, 
suitable for the show-ring or 100 
miles a day. 



ALMA, 
Santa Clara County, 



Cal. 



The Last Chance 

for California Breeders 

To Send Mares to ZOMBRO 2:1 1 

McKINNEY'S GREATEST SON AND GREATEST SIRE OP HIS AGE. 

Zombro will be taken East next Spring and will not be returned to California. 
He will make a fall and winter season at my place, No. 3727 Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. Zombro leads all trotting bred stallions as a sire of extreme speed 
this year, and his get have won more money than the get of any sire on this 
Coast. He has been the leading Pacific Coast sire for three years — 1906, 1907 and 
1908. Sixteen of his get have entered the 2:30 list this year, and while Bingen 
and Peter the Great each have one more in 2:30 list. Zombro leads all stallions 
as a sire of new 2:10 and 2:15 performers. He has four new ones in 2:10, three of 
them trotters, six new 2:15 performers, and seven new 2:20 performers. He now 
has eight in 2:10, 16 in 2:15 and 24 in 2:20, out of a total of 48 in the 2:30 list. 
Half of his standard performers have records below 2:20. He is the greatest speed 
sire of the age. Write me for terms. 

GEO. T. BECKERS, Owner. 
3727 S. Figueroa St., Lost Anjiclos, Cal. 



KlgyOJ^Or^)J:3; 

By McKinney 2:11%; dam Golden Rose by Falrose; 
second dam Lady Harper by Alaska; third dam by Algona; 
fourth dam by Oddfellow, thoroughbred. 

Kinney Rose is a dark bay stallion, stands 15.3 hands 
and weighs 1200 lbs. He is a splendid horse in every re- 
spect, handsome, intelligent, of good disposition, and in the 
opinion of many good judges is one of the fastest trotting 
sons of the great McKinney. 

There are but two colts in Kinney Rose's first crop and 
they are coming two. Both of those colts can show a J: In 
gait and that with limited handling. At a meeting held by 
the Woodland Driving Club. Nov. 29th. Kinney II.. a yearling 
by Kinney Rose, won the yearling stake taking the first and third heats in 2:50 
and 2:51 (the fastest heats trotted by a yearling in a race in 1908), being nosed 
out the second heat in 2:51 and this 7 weeks after being taken out of pasture. 
This colt 3 or 4 days before Thanksgiving was driven a mile by Det Bigelow on 
the Woodland track in 2:42. 




Season of '09 at the CHICO RACE TRACK. 



Terms: $35 for the Season. Return privilege 



The Norman Stallion Tom Terms: $15— $20 to insure 

8 years old, weighs 1,800 lbs. A first-class individual and very active horse. 

Yearlings by both of the above stallions will be at the track on exhibition. 

Address, CHRIS HASHAGEN, Manager, Chlco, Cal. 

WM. HASHAGEN, Owner. 

A Game Race 
Horse in the Stud 



Athasham 



Race Rec. 2:09i. 
Reg. No. 45026. 




Bay stallion, stands 15.3 weighs 1.150. Sired by Atbadon ( 1 ) 
2:27 (sire of The Donna 2:07%, Athasham 2:<i!i' ,. Sue 2:12. Lister- 
ine 2:13% and 8 others in 2:30); dam. the great brood mare Cora 
Wickersham (also dam of Nogi CI) 2:17%, (4) 2:10%. winner of :!- 
year-old trotting division Breeders Futurity 1907 and ( lecidenl and 
Stanford Stakes of same year). by .lunio 2 :22%(sireof dams of Ceo, 
0. 2:05%, etc.). Athasham has a great future before him- as a 
sire. He is bred right and made right, and has every nualilica- 
tion one can expect in a sire. He has been timed in 2 :<«'.•'.) in a 
race, and his courage is unquestioned. 

He w ill make the Season of 1909 al Orchard Farm, Fresno, 

Cal., for a Fee of $25. Approved mares. 

For further particulars address this place. 

D. L. BACHANT, R. R. 1, Fresno, Cal. 




ilton Gear m 



Sired by Harry (fear 25382 (sire of Harry Logan 
2:12%, etc.) by Kcho 4(V2 (sire Hi in 2::!" li-t. II pro 
ducing sons. 22 producing daughters). Hrsl dam 
Lulu N. by Dawn r.707. Record 2:lv',; Ju.l dam 
Alice by Browns McClellan. 

Will make the SEASON OF 1909 at the 



Fee: $25 the Season. 

For further particulars 
apply to or address 



Usual retun 
privilege. 



Fresno 

J. DEPOISTER, 



Fair Grounds 

Fresno, Cal. 



McKINNEY, 2:11%. 

Sire of 20 in 2 : 10, 49 in 2:16, 66 in 2:20, 100 in 2:30. 
Sire of the sires of 94 in 2:30 (17 in 2:10) and 
Dams of 6 in 2:10. 

GREATEST PRODUCER AND TYPICAL SIRE THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. 

McKinney stallions are few and are worth from eight times his fee 
UP- Book to others any time - to McKinney while you may. 
Only a few outside mares will be accepted. 



14 



THI BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



2-year-old trotter 



Here's Where the Buyers Will Be! 

FRED H. CHASE & CO. Announce the Greatest Sale Ever Held on the Coast 

At Pleasanton's Famous Track. 

3 Days-March 25, 26, 27, 1909-3 Days 

Entries close Monday, March 1st. 

Catalogues to Be Issued Monday, March 8th. 

A carload from Los Ancles already consigned, MR. CEO. A. POUNDER will send 

Lottie Lynwood 

Full Sister to the Great SOIUMl GM 2'.05l 

Entered in over $100,000 worth of .Stakes, all paid up on to date. Lottie Lynwood is 
the fastest 2-year-old trotter in America. Had more speed as a yearling than her 
famous sister did at four vears old. 

Wenja 2:1& 

A handsome mart' and a good money winner. Will trot in 2:10 this year. Sired hy 
Zolock 2:05% dam Xaulahka 2:14 hy Xutford 2:16. Wenja is an own sister to 
Prince Lock (2) 2:18, winner of Breeders Futurity of 1!H)8. Is a great racing pros- 
pect and the hest bred one for a brood mare in California. 

TED HAYES, l'leasanton. sends 

Moy 2:07f One of the fastest and best bred mares in the United States. 
She is by the great sire Prodigal. 

Modicium 2:13 by Geo. Ayers L8653. This is a very fast and high-class 
mare that can win in her class. 
WALTER MABEN, Los Angeles, consigns 
QUGer Knight 2:13 ' A great race trotter and tine matinee horse. 

A Sensational Three-Year-Old of winch fan particulars later. 

FRED WARD, Los Angeles. Bend* 

Explosion, bay mar.- by Steinway, the beet unmarked pacer in California. 
Can pace in 2:10. Would make great matinee mare. 
CHA8. De RYDER, Pleasanton. will sell 

Ten Head of High-Class Brood Mares, Colts and Fillies. 

This will be the Hest Sale ever held on the Coast, and the best advertised. 

(Jet in line and send in your entries early so as to secure a good position in the 
catalogue. Write for entry blanks, 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., 
Live Stock Auctioneers, 478 Market St., San Francisco. 




Southeast Cor. 10th and Bryant Sts w san francisco, cal. 



AT OUR NEW YEARS OPENING SALE 

200 Head of Horses 

will 1* offered at our spacious and finely appointed Salesyards and 
Stables, located as above. 

100 of the famous double-square brand 

of horses from Nevada and 100 head all-purpose gentle broke horses, in- 
cluding draft horses, fast roadsters and farm workers. 

As usual we shall guarantee all horses to be as represented, and allow 
twenty-four hours for inspection and delivery. 



100 Head Offered at 8 p. m. 



100 Head Offered at 1 p. m. 



All cars transfer to Eighth and Tenth Street lines which pass our 
talesyard. Consigners write for terms. 



WESTERN HORSE MARKET, 



E. Stewart 6 Co., Auctioneers 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



The Stallion Number 

—of t HE- 
BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, new. 
and articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 

As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many 
owners are not ready to say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Fancy 
Siberian 
Robes 
f Selling 
| At Less 
I Than 
I One - Half | 

VVWNNNV 



No Two Alike 



Fremont 



at 



Mission 



Beautiful and highly serviceahle ere- 
ctions which up t<> the present time 
have been selling at $20 are offered at 
the sacrifice price of $9.50 each. 
o 

A splendid line <>f exceptionally 
pleasing < >. Super high-grade plush 
robes must also be sold at once. 
These are offered to you at $8 each. 
o 

An exceptionally good line of cheap- 
er robes selling as low as $3.40 each. 
Call early ami make your selections. 
They are going rapidly. 

Phone 

Douglas 
3O00 




New Edition of John Splan's Book 



Life With the Trotter 



»» 



Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotier gives us a clear insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Breeder and Sportsman, P. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cat. 

Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



Saturday, January 23, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



EARTH'S WONDERS 



Yosemite— 

Open the year 'round. The quick way is Santa 
Fe to Merced; thence Yosemite Valley Railroad. 

Grand Canyon— 

The biggest thing in the world. El Tovar hotel 
on brink of Canyon. 
Under Fred Harvey management, one of the finest 
hotels in southwest. — Our folders tell. 
H. K. GREGORY, A. G. P. A.. San Francisco. JOHN. J. BYRNE, A. P. T. M.. Los Angeles 





F 


■ 




Santa Fe 


It 


■ 


Jj 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



-SOLD BY— 




C. F. MOREL, Huccessor to 

J. O'Knue Co... San Francisco, Oil. 

W. A. Sayre Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller & Patterson San Diego, Cal. 

J. G. Rend & Bro Ogden, Utah 

Jublnville & Nance Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Tlios. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

Win. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

V. Koch . San Jose, Cal. 

Keystone Bros San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Reedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1210. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 



418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



No road too rough. Has 
cushion tires and carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The longspring makes 
it easy riding.and does away 
with all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with Pneumatic tires. 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 



W. J. KENNEY, 



Sales agent for 
California. 



Standard the world over. 



Address for printed matter and prices. 



53I Valencia Street, San Francisco 



AXWORTHY, 2:15^. ^Z?o»Z" 

Sire of 59 in 2:30, including 

World's greatest trotting mare World's greatest three-year-old 

Hamburg Belle, 2:04% Gen. Watts (3), 2:06^ 

If you wish to book - be quick while his book is sti'l open. 
For particulars, mention this paper and address, 

ghp iEntpirr (Etlg 3Farm5, Lexington, Ky. 



Three Legged BorsefT\ 

., . M^iurfMMhvnv mMriH Thft MBBtrV fa fill! of t.hpm The V 

urb, ^ 

these \ H 

Qui tin's Ointment m \ J 



are not curiosities by any means. The country is full of them. The 
fourth lee is there all right but it is not worth anything because of a cur 
splint spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of th 
ailments and put another sound leg under him by the use of 




It in time tried and reliable. When shone In cured 
with Qulnn'a ointment ho Btsn cured. Mr. E. K.Uurke 
oIBprinirUeld, Mo., writes as follows: "I have been 
uslntt Qulnn'a Ointment forieveral years and hare ef- 
fected many marvelous cures; It will no deeper and* 
cause less puin than any blister I ever used. Thought 
It my duty lor the benefltof horses to recommend your 
Ointment. 1 am never without It " Thlelstbei/eneral 
verdict by all who {five Qulnn'a Olntmant a trial. For 
curbs, splints, spavins. wlndpufTs. and all bunches it 
Is uneqimled. Prloa SI par bold* at all drueirists 



_..equ — 

or sent by mall. Send for circulars, testimonials, Ac 
W. B. Eddy A Co., Whitehall, M. Y. 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough.GoIcher <fc Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phon. Temporary 1883. JJQ Market ^ ^ Franc j sc() 

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Smokeless Shot Gun Powder 

THE OLD-TIME FAVORITE 

Hard Grain, 



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Ask Your Dealer for 



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A Powder for the Most Critical ! 



MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS. 




E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 



Distemper Always Dangerous. 

Valuable horses fall easy victims to this often fatal dis- 
ease. When it once breaks out it spares none. To prevent its 
spread and cure the sick, put a ten spoon f u 1 of i'KAI'TS IMS- 
TICMI'KU CUHK in the feed or on the tongue once :i day and 
your trouble will soon end. Get It from vour druggist or we 
will send it prepaid. 1)0 cents and $ 1 .00 a bottle. I). 10. N KWK 
!>fi Bayo Vista avenue, Oakland, Cal., Paclllc Coast Agent. 



Stallion Folders, 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding BS 
far as you know AMD WE wn.i. DO THE ukm . 

Proof submitted before tlic work is printed. Half-tons I'icturc.- 
made from Photographs. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS $1.00 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

Pacific Bldg«, Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



16 



THH BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 23, 1909. 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



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NO SLIDE TO WORK 

With the toft hand. Ftijrlit hand pulls trigger. Kecoil ejects, rocks and 
reloads. Solid breech protection against "blow hacks." Safety just before 
trigger linger prevents accidental discharge. Full line of double guns if 
you prefer. 

The Ideal Duck Gun. Liat Price $40 and Upwards. 

Remington Arms Company 

1 1 ion. New York. Agency, 313 Broadway, New York. 




WINCHESTER 

.22 CALIBER REPEATING RIFLE 

The Model I906 Handling Three Cartridges 



This Winchester repeater, which is now made to handle either .22 
Short, .22 Long or .22 Long Rifle Rim Fire Cartridges, is the biggest 
value in a rifle ever offered. It is made with the same skill and care 
as Winchester rifles of larger caliber, which means that it is accurate, 
reliable and well finished. It takes down easily and packs in a 
small compass, making it a handy adjunct to any sportsman's 
kit. The list price is only $10.50 and it retails for less. 

Winchester Guns and Ammunition — the Red W Brand — are sold everywhere. 

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2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



$ 5,000 



REOPENED 



GUARANTEED. 



$ 5,000 



The State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 1 



CUARANTEED. 



Foals of Mares Covered in 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$2900 for Trotting Foals.- 



$2100 for Pacing Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento Cal 

Entries to close February 1, '09. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS : 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

Mare was bred. 

FORT WO- YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at the California State Fair, 1911 

TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS .... $800 
TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS 500 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR-TH REE- YEAR-OLDS to Take Place at theCalifornia State Fair, 1912 

THREE-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS . . . $2000 
THREE-YEAR-OLD PACERS .... I500 



i:\TRV.\rE PAYMENTS ?2 to nominate mare on February 1, 1909, when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 

I'lO'l $5 December 1 1*109- $10 on Yearlings. February /, 1910; $10 on Two-Year-Olds, February 1, 1911; $10 on Three- Year-Olds. February 1, 1912. 

' STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace; $25 to start In the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start 
in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when mnking payments to start whether the horse entered Is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three-yenr-old divisions. 

For Entry Blanks and further particulars, address the Secretary. 

CONDITIONS : 

The races for Two-Y'ear-Olds will be mile heats. 2-in-3, and for Three-Year-Olds, 3-in-5. Distance for Two-Year-Olds, 150 yards; for Three-Year-Olds, 100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or If either the mare or foal dies before February 1. 1910, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will be no return of a payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid in or contracted for. In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mare must be given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred In 1908. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5,000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions x , t , M 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 
Entries open to the world. Write for Entry Blanks to 



B. F. RUSH, 

President. 



J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 



Owners of Live Stock in California 
Should Insure in Their Own Associatinn, 

The California Mutual Live 
Stock Insurance Association 



Because 

It is the only institution of the kind organized under the laws of 
California with the home office in this State 

We insure live stock against death from disease, fire, lightning, 
tornado, cyclones and every casualty; also through accident which may 
necessitate the death of any animal. 

Losses are paid promptly without discount and without unnecessary 
delay. 

We have a guaranty deposit under the control of the State Treasurer 
for the protection of our members and policy holders. 

There is $100 of values lost to farmers by death of stock, by disease 
and accident, where $1 is lost by fire. 

We have no dividends or profits paid to idle office holders. 

The business of the Association is conducted as economically as is 
consistent with good management, and the earnings are divided among 
the policy holders. 

This is an age of Mutual Insurance, and it is true the cheapest and 
strongest companies in the United States to-day are composed of and 
managed by the policy holders, who are farmers and stockmen, as has 
been demonstrated in the East. 

The directors and officers are elected annually by the policy holders. 

WHY PAY LARGE PREMIUMS FOR PROFIT TO EASTERN 
COMPANIES WHEN YOU CAN CO-OPERATE WITH YOUR FELLOW 
FARMER AND STOCKMAN AND SECURE YOUR INSURANCE AT 

COST? 

We are receiving daily many testimonials 

from policy holders whose claims have been and are being promptly and 

satisfactorily settled. 



References ; 



Oakland Bank of Savings, Oakland, Cal.; National Bank of California, 
Los Angeles, Cal.: Secretary Savings Bank, Los Angeles, Cal., or any 
reliable bank in the Stale. 



M 



L. WRIGHT, Pres. 

Home Office: 270- 
Phone Oakland 3990. 



I. A. WRIGHT, Secy. 

Bacon Building, 12th St. ami Broadway, 

OAKLAND, Cal. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 

Breeder and Sportsman 



310 DUE ON YEARLINGS 

Tuesday, February 2, '09 

Nothing more to pay before 1910. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8, $7,250 

Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1907 

Foals horn 1908, to trot and pace at two and three years old, entries closed l)e- 

cemher 2, 1!(07. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1,750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nomin- 
ators of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — 92 to nominate mare on December 2, 1907, when 
name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 
May I, 1908; $5 October 1, 1908; »10 on Yearlings February 2. 1909; 910 
on Two-Year-Olds February 1, 1910; 910 on Three-Year-Olds February 1. 
1911. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — 925 to start In the Two-Year-Old Pace; 935 to start in 
the Two-Year-Old Trot; 935 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; 950 to 
start in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 
Nominator*! must designate when making payment* to start whether the borne 

entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 
Colts that Mtart at two yearn old are not barred from starting again in the three- 
year-old divisions. 

A CHANCE FOR THOSE WHO FAILED TO ENTER. 
SUBSTITUTIONS— A few of the original nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for foals 
of 1908 have advised us that, because of barrenness of the mare or death of the foal, they wish to dis- 
pose of their entries. If you ow n one or more whose dams you failed to name when entries closed, 
by making the payments due any time on or before Feb. "J, 1909. which covers payments to Feb. 1. 
1910. the few substitutions to be disposed of wiil be awarded in the order in which remittances are 
received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich engagement. 

Address all communications to the Secretary. 
E. P. HEAI.D, President. F. W. KELLEV, Secretary. 

P. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cal. 
Office 306 Pacific Duilding. Corner Market and Fourth Streets. 



TALLION OWNER 

If In Deed of anything in the line of Stallion Cards, compiled and 
printed. Tabulated Pedigrees, Stock Catalogues, Horse Hooks 
Stallion Service Hooks, Horse Cuts in stock and made from photos, 
Breeding Hobbles, Stallion Supports, Prcgnators and all Specialties 
for Stallions. : : ; Write for samples and prices. 

MAGNUS FLAWS & CO. 358 Dearborn St. CHICAGO. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postofflce. 



Terms— One Year $3; Six Months $1.76; Three Months *1 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A SENSATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT truly is the 
one made by Fred H. Chase & Co. this week, in which 
this firm states that the first day of the big sale at 
Pleasanton which is set for the 25th, 26th and 27th 
of March, will be devoted to a complete dispersal of 
the famous Nutwood Stock Farm, founded by the 
late Martin Carter. There are not over sixty head of 
trotting bred horses on the farm, but they are all 
choicely bred. Martin Carter was no narrow-minded 
breeder, but sent his mares to the best stallions 
standing for service in California. He started in with 
Wilkes, Nutwood and Geo. M. Patchen blood and was 
always breeding up. He had great faith in his horse 
Nutwood Wilkes as a sire of brood mares and sent 
the fillies by him to choice stallions that he figured 
would nick well with his blood. The stallions on 
the farm are the famous Nutwood Wilkes, sire of 
four in 2:10 and the dams of four more in that list, 
now 21 years old but vigorous and in fine condition, 
and the young son of that horse, Lord Alwin, an 
own brother to John A. McKerron 2:04 l / 2 , the fast- 
est trotting stallion in America. Lord Alwin is a 
young horse, and the first of his get to start, Ella 
M. R. 2:16%, was the fastest two-year-old trotter on 
the Pacific Coast last year. There are yearlings on 
the farm by Nutwood Wilkes, Lord Alwin, Bon Voy- 
age and Greco B., two-year-olds by Nutwood Wilkes, 
Star Pointer and Lord Alwin; three-year-olds by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, Lord Alwin, Star Pointer and Bonnie 
McK.; four-year-olds by Zombro and Searchlight. 
There are many young brood mares by Nutwood 
Wilkes 2:16V 2 , Altivo 2:18%, Klatawah, 2:05V 2 . 
Chestnut Tom 2:15, Stam B. 2:11%, Searchlight 
2:03%, Monbells 2:23%, Bonnie Direct 2:05%, Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%, and other highly bred and producing 
sires. The chance for breeders to get the very acme 
of intelligent and experienced breeding is offered by 
this sale, and we expect to see the largest crowd 
of actual buyers gathered at Pleasanton when the 
sale begins, that has been seen at a horse sale in Cal- 
ifornia in many years. We shall have to delay until 
next week any further particulars of this sale which 
is the most important dispersal sale since the fa- 
mous Palo Alto Stock Farm horses were sold. 
o 

THE STATE FAIR FUTURITY which has a guar- 
anteed value of $5,000, and is offered by the Califor- 
nia State Agricultural Society for the foals of mares 
covered in 1908 to trot and pace as two- and three- 
year-olds, will close for the nomination of mares 
on Monday next, February 1st. It may be that a 
few of the mares have already dropped their foals, 
but they are very few, and it makes no difference 
anyhow as those having already foaled can be nomi- 
nated just the same. This stake deserves a big entry 
list, as colt stakes are the very life of the breeding 
business and should be patronized by every owner of 
a mare that patronizes a trotting or pacing stallion. 
Look over the advertisement in this issue which 
contains all the conditions as to payments, etc., and 
make your entry in time. 

o 

TEN DOLLARS MAKES AN EAGLE, and an eagle 
is the amount due on Tuesday next, February 2d, 
on each and every foal of 1908 that is in Pacific 
Breeders Futurity No. 8, which stake has a guaran- 
teed value of $7,250. When you nominated your 
mare, in this stake, and made the other payments on 
the colt you were heading for first money and trav- 
eling in the right direction. Now that your colt or 
filly is a yearling, don't switch off on the wrong track 
and lose all chance of winning any part of the stake 
by failing to make this payment. The date is Tues- 
day next. 



RUNNING RACES should be a part of the program 
given by the California State Fair each year, and 
would add much to the attractiveness of each after- 
noon's sport. Because continuous winter racing and 
bookmaking are in disfavor in this State, is no rea- 
son why the public should not enjoy good clean rac- 
ing between thoroughbreds at the State Fair every 
year, the same as it enjoys harness racing. Cali- 
fornia has been one of the leading States in breeding 
thoroughbred horses, ever since it was admitted into 
the Union, and there are many breeders and owners 
of the running race horse who would be glad to enter 
and race at the State Fair were purses and stakes 
hung up for them. Before racing was made a gam- 
bling business on this Coast, the running events were 
as much a part of the program at the annual State 
and county fairs as were the harness races. To say 
that racing cannot be conducted without betting is 
very foolish considering the great success attending 
the sport in the Eastern and Western States where 
betting has been prohibited. All the big fairs in 
the East give good purses for trotters, pacers and 
runners, and there is always an enthusiastic crowd 
on hand to see the sport, one sort of racing seeming 
to be just as popular as another. The Breeder and 
Sportsman suggests to the California State Board of 
Agriculture that it advertise a six-days' program for 
1909, in which there will be two harness races and 
three running events each day. There is to be a big 
fair at Sacramento this year and the crowd will be 
the largest ever seen on the Sacramento fair grounds. 
This crowd will enjoy racing without betting, as it 
has for the past two years, and the better the pro- 
gram the larger this crowd will be. 

o 

FOUR WEEKS FROM TO-DAY the stallion num- 
ber of the Breeder and Sportsman will be issued and 
those who fail to get their stallion's announcement 
in it will miss an opportunity to place his name and 
qualifications before a very large number of Pacific 
Coast breeders. Besides a very handsome cover in 
colors, the paper will contain fifty pages of reading 
matter and write-ups of the harness horses of the 
Coast, together with many special articles and 
statistical tables of great interest to horsemen. As 
the edition will be a very large one it will be an 
extra good advertising medium for those who desire 
to secure the patronage of those interested in horses, 
or in the sports of the field, shooting, fishing, etc. 
Many elegant half-tone plates are being engraved 
especially for this issue, which will give it an added 
interest and value. If none of the Breeder and 
Sportsman's solicitors have yet called on you, send 
word to this office and an appointment will be made, 
or prepare your copy, mail it to this office and you 
will receive by return mail full particulars as to the 
cost of the same displayed in any manner from an 
inch of space to a full page. The earlier this copy 
is received the better display can be made and 
position given. Don't miss advertising your stallion 
in the edition of February 27th. 

— — o 

THE STORM CLOUDS have wept their rainy tears 
on California, gently but copiously, for the last four 
weeks, and the river districts of the Sacramento and 
San Joaquin valleys have suffered from overflows to 
a great extent. The storm has been one of the great- 
est in years and the records of high water have been 
broken at many points. The damage done where the 
levees have broken has been quite heavy, but like 
all others, the rain clouds that have hovered over 
California during this month of January, have a very 
silvery lining which can be plainly seen by those who 
look forward to the harvest months which come later 
in the year. Every very wet winter in California is 
followed by a very prosperous summer and fall. 
Barring the low lands which suffer from floods, there 
is never too much rainfall for the grain, vegetable 
and fruit lands of California. This State is now 
certain to send forth tremendous crops of fruits and 
grains in 1909, while the dairy and stock farms can 
already see coming one of the heaviest grass and 
hay crops in the State's history. The heavy rainfall 
In the valleys and deep snow in the mountains means 
plenty of water for mining, irrigation and power. 
The rain has damaged the few, hut it is benefitting 
the many. "There's millions in It." 

o 

PURSES ARE INCREASING in both number and 
size at the harness meetings given In connection wifh 
the county fairs in the Eastern and Western States. 
The sport is so popular In some sections and the at- 
tendance so great, that entrance fees have been re- 
duced to as low as two per cent at some meetings. 



THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR to get your stallion 
before the public, and the only way to do it is to 
advetrise. There are many ways to advertise stallions, 
but it is conceded by all that the columns of a journal 
devoted to horse breeding is the best, as such a 
journal reaches and is read by the very people who 
patronize stallions. On February 27th this year the 
Breeder and Sportsman will issue its annual stallion 
edition, of which a very large number will be printed 
and circulated all over the Coast. There will prob- 
ably not be a trotting or pacing horse breeder in 
California, Oregon or Washington who will not look 
over its advertising columns and study the breeding 
of every stallion there mentioned. Newspaper adver- 
tising is the cheapest and best advertising one can 
do, as it gives more for the money expended than 
any other method yet discovered. Quite a large 
number of stallion owners have already signed up for 
space in this stallion issue and every owner in the 
State should be represented. The cost of even one 
service fee of a horse that is standing for $20 will pay 
for a well displayed advertisement. It certainly looks 
as if the opportunity to secure a good display adver- 
tisement for that small amount should not be neg- 
lected. 

o 

THE GREAT INTERNATIONAL trotting race 
which is to take place next Monday, February 1st, 
at St. Petersburg will be raced on the ice. There are 
a good many race meetings held over ice-courses, 
that is, the tracks are flooded (over the snpw) and a 
thick crust of solid ice is formed over which they 
race. No horse is allowed to jog over the track, 
there being a special course for that purpose. The 
ice-record over there is 2:11% held by Zamisse, a 
son of Quartercousin 2:23%, from an Orloff mare. 
A pure bred Orloff trotter, Krepish, lowered the rec- 
ord for his breed last November to 2:15% and will 
be a starter in the big race. Aged American horses 
will have to give him an allowance of seven seconds 
and it is figured they will, therefore, have to trot 
in about 2:08 to beat him. 

o 

CHARLES DE RYDER'S CONSIGNMENT. 



About a dozen head of broodmares, colts and fillies 
have been consigned to Fred H. Chase's Second An- 
nual Pleasanton Sale, which comes off on March 
25th, 26th and 27th and which will be the greatest 
auction of trotters and pacers ever held in the State. 
While Mr. DeRyder owns one of the best small farms 
in the Livermore Valley, he needs the feed there 
for the mares that will be bred to his stallions this 
year, consequently has consigned to this sale all the 
mares and colts of his own. They are all highly bred 
as the following partial list will show: 

Lilly S., foaled 1896, by Direct 2:05^. dam Lilly 
Stanley 2:17%, dam of three in the list and three 
producing sons, by Wbippleton, sire of the dam of 
Nelly R. 2:10. Lilly S. is standard and registered. 
She is in foal to Star Pointer. 

Tacona, foaled 1896, by Birchwood 2:15, son of 
Nutwood, dam Frances Medium, (dam of six in the 
list, four trotters and two pacers), by Happy Medium, 
second dam Annabel, (dam of two and grandam of 
twelve, including Heir-at-Law 2:05%, sire of Minor 
Heir 1:59%) by Geo. Wilkes, third dam the famous 
broodmare Jessie Pepper. Tacona is standard and 
registered. She was bred to Alameda 2:22% in 1907 
and her yearling colt The Heir, will also be offered 
at this sale. He is entered in all the Pacific Coast 
states and in the American Breeders Stallion and 
Matron Stakes. 

May Moon, foaled 1904, by Barondale 2:11% (son 
of Baron Wilkes and a great, broodmare by Nutwood), 
dam Idlemay 2:27% by Electioneer, second dam May. 
dam of two and grandam of three, by thoroughbred 
Wildidle, third dam the famous old trotting mare 
Mayflower 2:30V6 by St. Clair. May Moon is eligi- 
ble to registration under Rule 1. 

Brown mare, eligible to registration, by Cupid 
2:18, dam Countess by McKinney, second dam Miss 
Valensin, dam of three in I lie list by Valensiu 1 20 19, 
third dam Humming Bird 2::',n. dam of Hummer 
2:18% by Tecumseh. This mare is in foal to Star 
Pointer. 

A yearling bay filly by Star Pointer 1:59%, dam the 
Cupid mare above. 

King Dingce, the handsome brown stallion, six 
years old, by Zombro 2:11, dam Diavolo by Diablo 
2:09%, second dam the great, broodmare Lilly Lang- 
try, will also be offered at this sale. Mr. DeRyder 
thinks this stallion will be a great sire and knows 
ho can give him a fast record. He is one of the most 
stylish horses in California. 

This consignment of Mr. DoRvdcr's will have two 
or three more, of which mention will be made later. 
There is not a cull in the entire lot but all are choice 
animals. 

o 

Forty-two horses with records of 2:20 and better, 
died in 1908. In the list were Coney, 2:02 and Ad- 
miral Dewey 2:03%. 



Nancy Hanks 2:01, Hamburg Belle 2:01%, Silicon. 
2:13% and Klsie Le.vbiirn, dam of Jack Leyburn, are 
a highly bred quartet owned at Hamburg Place, Ky. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



| THROUGH SANTA CRUZ AND SANTA | 
| CLARA I 

(By C. C. Crippen.) « 

Watsonville is an attractive little city of between 
five and six thousand population, situated in the 
midst of a very rich agricultural district in Santa 
Clara county about six miles from the coast. They 
raise a few apples down there, three thousand and 
two hundred car loads having been shipped from 
there this fall. 

Potatoes is another leading product and they 
also raise horses, mostly draft horses but the trot- 
ting bred has not been overlooked. Welcome 2.10% 
Highland C. 2:19%, Boodle 2:12%, Embrosa by 
McKinney, dam Hazel Wilkes 2.11% by Guy Wilkes 
and a few other well bred stallions of lesser note 
have been stood for public service in that community 
during the last few years, besides a number of 
mares have been shipped away and bred to high-class 
stallions. Watsonville needs a track where the many 
well-bred young things being raised around there 
might be trained. The ordinary breeder is a great 
deal more apt to train and develop his colts if he 
can have it done near home than if he has to send 
them to some distant track, where he can but seldom 
see them work, and then only at expense and trou- 
ble of taking a trip that is often more of a hardship 
than a pieasnire. The cost of building and maintain- 
ing a mile track is considerable, but it oniy costs one- 
half as much to build and maintain a half-mile 
track, and a good deal less than one-half as much 
ground is necessary, which is a big item where land 
costs as much as it does in any location where a 
track is worth the while to build. I believe that Wat- 
sonville and many other towns in the State of 
similar size would support a half-mile track and that 
meetings with purses of $300 and $400 could be 
successfully given and that it would not be long be- 
fore harness horse racing would become as popular 
here as it is now in the Eastern States, where every- 
body goes to "the trots." They go to see the races 
and not to play them or to gamble. Many people 
in this country associate horse racing with gambling 
and horsemen with gamblers, and these same people 
do not know that the great majority of trotting horse 
breeders, owners and trainers in this State will be 
glad to see the anti-gambing bili passed that is now 
before the Legislature. Anti-gambling laws cannot 
hurt the trotter, his owner or his driver. There is 
a fascination about the breeding, driving, training 
and racing the trotter and pacer that will keep men 
in the business if there is never another ticket sold 
on a horse race. And without the gambling, every 
horse will be out to win and genuine sport will be 
the result. Every spectator will be satisfied with the 
entertainment and will be sure to come again. Har- 
ness races will become popular, more tracks will be 
built, more horses bred and trained, and a better 
market for them and better prices obtained. 

Henry Struve has done more to improve the light 
harness horse breed in that part of Monterey County 
than any other breeder. He kept the game old Boodle 
2:12% there two years, Welcome 2:10% three years. 
Highland C. 2:19% in 1908, and will keep this son of 
Expresso there for the season of 1909, and perhaps 
another highly bred young horse whose name I am 
not yet at liberty to mention. 

E. S. Train, owner of the great pacing colt Ray o' 
Light, made the season last year at Watsonville with 
the black pacing horse Steam Beer, by Mestoe, son of 
Sable Wilkes 2:18. This is a very handsome, stylish, 
fast and smooth-gaited pacer, that would, with op- 
portunities, take a low record. I like everything 
about him but his name. I never did like steam beer. 
Mr. Struve was always a great admirer of the game 
trotting mare Princess 2:13% and leased her a year 
ago and bred her to Harry Helman's young Wilkes 
horse Alconda Jay and she is now in foal to that son 
of Jay Bird. Princess was bred and is still owned 
by J. B. Iverson of Salinas, sired by Eugeneer 2:28, 
son of Electioneer, and Lady Ellen, dam of six in 
2:30. Her dam is Belle, dam of Prince Gift 2:12 and 
two others by Kentucky Prince. I saw her force Ole 
out in 2:10%, doing the mile in 2:11 herself. 

Mr. W. T. Sillinian owns a grand little trotting 
brood mare in Little Miss 2:17 by Sidmore, son of 
Sidney 2:19%. Little Miss was bred in 1903 to 
Searchlight 2:03% and produced a very handsome 
filly that is now five years old and a pacer. She 
then had four fillies in the next four years by Wel- 
come 2:10% and is now in foal to that magnificent 
son of the "King of race horses," The Limit. The 
oldest Welcome filly is pronounced by horsemen 
who have seen her to be a very promising young 
pacing prospect. 

J. H. Thompson owns a handsome black mare by 
Boodle 2:12%, dam by Adrian, that has been a mile 
in 2:24 on a trot with two months' work over the 
Salinas track. 

P. J. Thomson owns a good young stallion in El 
Pajaro 2:29%, by Boodle 2:12%, dam by Carr's 
Mambrino. This horse is a full brother to Valen- 
tine, 2. 2:29%, three-year-old trial 2:21. 

The Rev. E. L. Rich, pastor of the First Presby- 
terian Church at Watsonville, loves a good horse as 
all good men do. When I was training colts at Palo 
Alto Stock Farm in the early '90's, Mr. Rich was at- 
tending Stanford University, and was a noted ath- 
lete and footbali player on that college's winning 



eleven. His love for horses made him a frequent 
visitor at the Palo Alto stables. It was then I made 
his acquaintance, and I have enjoyed the honor and 
pleasure of his acquaintance and friendship ever 
since. Fourteen years ago he bought a nice-looking 
yearling colt by Magic, son of Elmo 2:27, and owns 
him still. He developed into a large, handsome pacer 
that has given his owner many an exhilerating spin 
down the road, and he very seldom had to take 
any one's dust. Mr. Rich has recently purchased a 
black four-year-old filly by Mestoe, son of Sable 
Wilkes, that is a good-looker and has some speed as 
well. There is no one who loves a fast horse any 
better than this very popular preacher of the gospel, 
who has held his first job down for thirteen years, 
his present charge being his first one. 



Santa Cruz is a very delightful place to visit during 
the summer months, but when it rains as hard as it 
did the day I was there last week, its charms are 
invisible to the naked eye. 

However, I spent a very pleasant evening with 
the young owner of Ray o' Light (3) 2:08% at the 
home of his parents across the river on Soquel ave- 
nue. Mr. Train has at his place in Santa Cruz the 
handsome pacing stallion Steam Beer, that with but 
little work has been a mile in 2:17 and a quarter in 
31 seconds, two good-looking youngsters by this horse 
and a young mare by Alex Malone (full brother to 
the dam of Ray o' Light) that with only two months' 
work last, fall learned to trot a mile in 2:28%. 

Dr. J. M. Ferguson has a few at his place that are 
worthy of mention. One is a particularly well-bred 
two-year-old son of Kinney Lou. His dam is Prin- 
cess Bessum, by Egyptian Prince (son of Kentucky 
Prince and Egyptienne, by Mambrino King, next dam 
by Hambletonian (10), second dam Carrie Malone 
(dam of Cassiar 2:22 and Carrie B. 2:18, dam of 
Ray o' Light 2:08%), full sister to the great sire 
Chas. Derby 2:20 and the world's three-year-old 
champion pacer Klatawah 2:05%; third dam Katy 
G. (dam of seven in 2:30), by Electioneer 125. 

This is a large, handsome chestnut colt and Dr. 
Ferguson says he is a sure-enough trotter. In the 
next stall was Alex Malone, a bay stallion by Alexan- 
der Button 2:26%, sire of Yolo Maid 2:11%, Tom 
Ryder 2:13%, Margaret Worth 2:15 and a lot of 
other good trotters and pacers, and grand sire of the 
great race mare Miss Logan 2:06%. First dam Car- 
rie Malone (dam of two and two producing daugh- 
ters) by Steinway 2:25% (sire of five in 2:10), sec- 
ond dam Katy G (dam of seven) by Electioneer 125. 
This horse is not only strongly bred in speed-pro- 
ducing lines, but is a handsome type of a roadster 
and carriage horse; up-headed and stylish, 16 hands, 
weight 1250 pounds, and the best roadster stallion I 
ever drove, and I have driven him a great many 
miles. The doctor showed me two out of Susie K. 
2:21% (full sister to Col. Benton 2:14%) by Brown 
Jug, son of Nutwood 2.18%. One was a four-year- 
old black stallion by Mestoe, son of Sable Wilkes 
2:18, that is a fast pacer, and the other a brown two- 
year-old colt by Welcome 2:10%. This colt strongly 
resembles his sire. 



T. W. Barstow, at San Jose, has his young son of 
McKinney looking fine as silk. Nearest McKinney 
is a grand individual, 16 hands and nearly 1200 
pounds. He met with a serious accident a year ago 
that put him on the shelf for all of last season as 
far as training was concerned. While running in the 
paddock a huge sliver entered the right foot at the 
coronet and broke off. The wall of the foot directly 
over the sliver had to be cut away in order to ex- 
tract the sliver. The foot is sound and all right now, 
only a single seam in the foot being noticeable. Bar- 
ring any more bad luck, Nearest McKinney should 
make good this coming season, as he has already 
shown lots of speed, having trotted a mile over a 
half-mile track in 2:15, last half in 1:04, and eighths 
in 15 seconds. He is a McKinneV and you can't stop 
them, and his dam is by Nearest 2:22%, a full broth- 
er to the great John A. McKerron 2:04%, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America. 

Mr. Barstow has some nice youngsters by his Mc- 
Kinney horse that speak well for him as a coming sire. 
One particularly promising colt is a three-year-old 
and the first of his get. He is a pacer, and Mr. 
Barstow says he has more natural speed than any 
colt he ever saw, not barring Highfly 2:04%, who 
stepped a mile as a two-year-old in 2:17%. This fel- 
low is the property of Mrs. Barstow and she will 
have him prepared for his three-year-old engage- 
ments, but has not yet decided on a trainer. 

Mr. Barstow has a number of highly bred brood 
mares and young colts and fillies, that in blood lines 
are equal to any in the State. But the most Inter- 
esting one of the bunch is a two-year-old by Star 
Pointer, out of the dam of Nearest McKinney, by 
Nearest. He is a big, slashing colt, and strange to 
say, is a square trotter that can do nothing but trot. 
A daughter of Nearest that is to my mind a very 
valuable mare for breeding purposes is the young 
mare True Heart 2:19% trotting, that Mr. Barstow 
marked at the Phoenix races last November, when 
several months in foal to Kinney Lou, and with only 
thirty days' work. Her dam is Camma, by Norway 
(son of Gen. Benton and Norma, dam of Norval 
2:14%, Lucy Cuyler 2:15, Norris 2:22% and Nellie 
Benton 2:30). Camma is the dam of Jasper Paulsen 
2:16%, trotter, that I drove a quarter in 30% sec- 
onds by other watches than my own, and Rollea (3) 
2:23, European record 2:09. second, third and fourth 
dams all great brood mares by Kentucky Prince, 



Hambletonian 10 and American Star 14. Her foal 
by Kinney Lou ought to go some. 



Budd Doble still has his horses at Santa Clara, 
but will soon move to Salinas. The stable consists of 
Kinney Lou 2:07%, sire of Diamond Mc 2:26%, Delia 
Lou (3) 2:27%, Kinney G. (p) 2:24%, and a dozen 
others that could have taken records in 1908. In fact, 
every one of his get that had three months' work 
could have taken standard records. Diamond Mc 
2:26 is owned by John Ilogan of Soquel, but is still in 
Mr. Doble's stable, and wil be trained this coming 
season. Kinney de Lopez, three-year-old colt, dam 
by Direct 2:05%, a fast trotter, Delia Lou (3) 2:27%. 
four-year-old chestnut filly, dam by Goldnut, son of 
Nutwood 2:18%. This filly took her record with 
just sixty days' training, and is a 2:10 prospect sure. 
A two-year-old bay filly, dam Princess Leola by 
Leonal 2:17%, second dam Lady Dwyer by Menlo 
2:21% (son of Nutwood 600) third dam Silver (dam 
of Marin Jr. 2:13, and Hattie F. 2:18) by Silverthread 
(sire of the dam of Oakland Baron 2:09%), by The 
Moor, fourth dam Gertrude by The Moor, and fifth 
dam Kate Tabor by Mambrino Chief 11. I believe 
this is one of the best things Kinney Lou has yet 
sired. 

Last, but not least, is the bay five-year-old pacing 
gelding Redlight by Searchlight, dam Ruth C. by 
Guide 2:16%, son of Director. Without a great deal 
of work this fellow stepped a mile in 2:12, half in 
1:03 and quarters at a two-minute clip in his four- 
year-old form. By his breeding, Redlight should 
make a game race horse and set a fast mark oppo- 
site his name some day. 

o 

DEATH OF ARION'S DAM. 



There is another new made grave in the plot at 
Palo Alto Farm where so many of the horses which 
made that farm famous, lie buried. On the 15th day 
of the present month Manette, daughter of the great 
Nutwood, and dam of Arion, whose record of 2:10% 
as a two-year-old to high wheel sulky has never been 
equalled, even since the bike sulky was invented, 
died at the farm from old age, having lived for 
nearly 31 years. She was foaled on the 7th day of 
August 1878. 

Manette was a bay mare, 15 hands and an inch 
in heighth, and was bred by J. W. Knox, who owned 
Nutwood and kept the son of Belmont and Miss Rus- 
sell in California several years. 

The roster of Manette's foals as printed in the 
Palo Alto Farm catalogue shows that during her life- 
time she produced thirteen foals, as follows: 

1885, bay filly, Oro Fino 2:18 by Eros 2:29%. 

1886, bay colt, Electic 11321 by Electioneer. 

1887, bay colt, Electwood by Whips 2:27%. 

1888, bay filly, Helen T. by Electioneer. 

1889, bay colt, Arion (2) 2:10%, (4) 2:07% by 
Electioneer. 

1890, bay colt, Athel by Electioneer. 

1891, black filly Aerolite by Palo Alto 2:08%. 

1892, barren. 

1893, bay colt, Parion by Palo Alto 2:08%. 

1894, barren. 

1895, bay colt, Manalon by Advertiser 2:15%. 

1896, barren. 

1897, barren. 

1S95, bay colt. Manaloa by Advertiser 2:15%. 
1899, black filly by Advertiser 2:15%. 
3 900, barren. 

1901, barren. 

1902, bay colt Nazareta by Nazote 2:28%. 

1903, barren. 

1904, bay colt by Mendocino. 



A dispute over the breeding of Manette was the 
cause of considerable feeling between the Palo Alto 
Stock Farm people and the American Trotting Reg- 
ister Association. W^hen Manette was registered in 
Volume VI her breeding was given as by Nutwood, 
dam Addie by Hambletonian Chief, son of 
Hambletonian 10, grandam Manfon, called a 
Henry Clay mare, and she was registered 
as bred by Peter Coutts, Mayfield, and owned 
by Leland Stanford. Arion was registered No. 
18,000 in Vol. XI and his dam Manette was given the 
same breeding as in Vo. VI. In Vol. XII the Reg- 
ister Association, from information it had received 
and which it believed to be correct, changed the 
breeding of Manette to read as by Nutwood, dam Em- 
blem by Tattler 300, second dam Young Portia by 
Mambrina Chief 11, third dam Portia by McCrack- 
en's Roebuck, fourth dam by Blackburn's Whip. 
There was a long controversy over the matter, but 
the general public has accepted the corrected ver- 
sion, even J. Malcolm Forbes, who paid $125,000 for 
Arion, the largest price ever paid for a horse in 
America, giving the mare Emblem as the second 
dam of Arion in all his catalogues. At Palo Alto 
Farm, however, the original breeding under which 
Manette was registered was always claimed to be the 
correct one. Senator Stanford having investigated 
the matter and satisfied himself that Addie by Ham- 
bletonian Chief and not Emblem by Tattler, was the 
dam of Manette. 

Manette produced three with records, all trotters — 
Arion 2:07%, Oro Fino 2:18 and Manaloa 2:26%. 
Her son Electic has sired one standard trotter, an- 
other son Athel has sired two, and Arion has about 
fifty to his credit, including Lord Roberts 2:07%, 
Nico 2:08%, and his daughters are producing well, 
one of them being the sire of Sadie Mac 2:06%. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



HERE'S THE FALL PROGRAM. 



Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Offer $15,500 
in Purses. 



Three to enter and two to start is the plan on 
which the P. C. T. H. B. A. will give its fall rac- 
ing this year. The program for a four days' meeting 
has been agreed upon by the Hoard of Directors and 
instead of saying "purses must fill to the satisfaction 
of the Board," they announce "three to enter and 
two to start." 

The date and place where the meeting will be 
held have not yet been determined, but the date 
of closing will be April 1st. The program is as 



follows: 

Wednesday. 

2:20 Class, Trotting Purse $ 2.000 

2:10 Class, Trotting 750 

Free-for-All, Pacing 750 

Thursday. 

2- year-olds, Trotting Division, Futurity Stake 

No. 7 1,450 

2:14 Class, Pacing Purse 700 

3- year-old, Pacing Division, Futurity Stake 

No. 6 1,300 

Friday. 

2- year-olds, Pacing Division, Futurity Stake 

No. 7 950 

3- year-olds, Trotting Division. Futurity Stake 

No. 6 3,300 

2:14 Class, Trotting Purse 700 

Saturday. 

2:08 Class, Pacing Purse 750 

2:20 Class, Pacing Purse 2,000 

Free-for-all, Trotting Purse 750 



Total $15,500 

o 



A. B. COXE BUYS STERLING McKINNEY'S DAM. 



One day last week Mr. A. B. Coxe, of Paoli, Penn., 
who was waiting over in San Francisco a few days 
for the Hawaiian steamer to leave, saw the adver- 
tisement in the Breeder and Sportsman in which 
Capt. C. H. Williams, of Palo Alto, offered his brood 
mare Twenty-Third, by Director, the dam of Ster- 
ling McKinney 2:06%, for sale. Making an ap- 
pointment Mr. Coxe ran down to Palo Alto by train, 
looked the mare over and the next morning the mare 
was his. The price is private, but there was no 
haggling over it, but the transfer was made in a few 
minutes. Twenty-Third is a well preserved mare, 
foaled in 1891, and is considered safely in foal to 
Henry Helman's young Jay Bird stallion, Alconda 
Jay. The mare will be shipped to Los Angeles and 
sent East when Geo. Beckers leaves for Paoli with 
Zombro 2:11, to which horse she will be bred in the 
spring. Capt. Williams has a very fine two-year-old 
from her by Nutwood Wilkes, that he will use as 
a broodmare, and last year sold a full sister to this 
filly to James W\ Marshall, of Dixon, that will also 
be used as a broodmare. Capt. Williams' fine stal- 
lion Unimak is an own brother to Sterling McKin- 
ney 2:06%, but has never been regularly trained, 
except to get a few weeks work each spring, Capt. 
Williams desiring to keep him perfectly sound until 
his seven-year-old form when he will be raced and 
given as low a record as possible. It is thought 
2:10 will not stop him. He is certainly a splendid 
specimen of a large, fine and sound horse now. 

o 

NUTWOOD WILKES. 



The three fastest pacers of 1908 bred in Cali- 
fornia were Copa de Oro 2:03%, Mona Wilkes 
2:03% and Highfly 2:04%. Nutwood Wilkes sired 
the first named, the dam of the second, and the sire 
of the third. 

The fastest two-year-old trotter in California in 
1908 was Ella M. R. 2:16%. Her sire is Lord Alwin 
by Nutwood Wilkes. 

The fastest trotter that left California last year, 
to race on the Grand Circuit was San Francisco 
2:07%, who was third in the great $50,000 handicap 
and won his race at Columbus in 2:07%, 2:07% and 
2:09%. His dam is by Nutwood Wilkes. 

The fastest trotting stallion in America since 
Cresceus was sold to Europe, is John A. McKerron 
2:04%. He is by Nutwood Wilkes. 

Nutwood Wilkes will be sold with all the horses 
on the famous Nutwood Stock Farm at Pleasanton, 
March 25th. 

This stallion is one of the greatest sires of early 
and extreme speed that ever lived. He is now 21 
years old, but sound and vigorous and looks like a 
horse of nine or ten. He is good for many more 
years of service. He should head some good stock 
farm. 

o 

TWO GOOD STALLIONS AT ALAMEDA. 



Henry Busing will remove his two stallions, 
Bonnie McKinney by McKinney 2:11%, and Bon- 
nie Searchlight by Searchlight 2:03% from Pleas- 
anton to Alameda race track about the middle of this 
month, and they will be in the stud at the latter place 
during the season of 1909. It is conceded by all 
horsemen who have seen Bonnie McKinney that he 
is one of the grandest looking sons of McKinney 
there is living, and the fact that his get are all of 
uniform dark color, with splendid conformation and 
great natural speed, stamp him as a coming sire. 
The oldest of his get are only three years old. 
Bonnie Searchlight is a slick going young pacer, 
now a three-year-old and will be permitted to serve 
a limited number of mares. Both these stallions are 
standard and registered. 



FROM THE ANTIPODES. 



The last Australasian mail brought the November 
and December numbers of the Victoria Trotting 
Record, a very interesting and newsy journal de- 
voted to trotting horse affairs of Australia. From 
the files received we glean the following: 

Twinkle Bells, a three-year-old filly by Abbey 
Bells, took a record of 2:20 at a meeting held last 
November. This is the three-year-old record for 
Australia. The filly was bred at Allendale Stock 
Farm, Melbourne, and was driven by Lou Robert- 
son, brother of Andrew Robertson, who purchased 
a number of horses for that farm while in California 
during the latter part of 1907. Twinkle Bells was 
only beaten a head in 2:17 by an aged horse in an- 
other race. 



The New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club made 
a profit of $10,000 on its meeting last November. It 
might be a good idea to get that club's officials to 
come to California and show us how they do it. 



There is not a harness meeting given in Australia 
or New Zealand but the greater part of the program 
is given over to handicaps, and yet the majority of 
American associations refuse to even try this sys- 
tem of racing. 



Mr. R. C. Simpson, of Armidale, N. S. W., who owns 
Medium Direct, the stallion formerly known in Cal- 
ifornia as Little Rey by Rey Direct 2:10, purchased 
from Allendale Stock Farm, Melbourne, the mare 
Electrine by Australian Electioneer, in foal to Abbey 
Bells, in the hopes that she would produce a filly 
which in due course would be bred to Medium Di- 
rect. Electrine foaled a colt soon after Mr. Simp- 
son purchased her, and he had her bred back to 
Abbey Bells and may get a filly next time. 



Cariola, a full sister to Agitato 2:09, died at Mel- 
bourne last November, where she was taken by R. 
McMillan a few years since. She was bred at Oak- 
wood Park Stock Farm and was by Steinway out of 
Tone by Ferguson. 



An Australian breeder writing on trotting horse 
breeding says: "The docility of the average Ameri- 
can trotter, and his fine action and endurance are 
needed here, but his legs we must improve upon." 



Andrew Robertson contributed the following to the 
December 2d issue of the Victorian Trotting Record, 
in regard to the death of M. E. Albaugh, a Kentucky 
trainer who went to Australia nearly thirty years 
ago: 

The death of Marshall Edward Albaugh, which 
took place at Christ church, N. Z., on Wednesday, 
18th November, removes from the field one of the 
oldest and most prominent trotting horse trainers 
in Australasia. He was an American by birth, and 
was born in the State of horses and ability to handle 
them was a natural gift to him. He came out to this 
country in company with Dr. Weir in 1882, and from 
then up to the time of his death, he was a profes- 
sional trainer and driver of trotting horses. Amongst 
the many horses he trained and developed were 
Osterly, The Baron, Mystery, Polly Huon, Young 
Burlington, Frederick, Velox, Vaunt, What, Elector, 
Lopp, O. Y. M., Roseneath, Al Franz, and scores 
of other good horses. 

Mr. Albaugh's career as a trotting horse trainer 
was well known throughout Australasia. He had 
learnt the business from the ground up, as most 
successful trainers have. As a reinsman, his achiev- 
ments speak for his abilities, although for several 
years past his career was marked by epochs of suc- 
cesses and failures, but. it may truthfully be said 
that when he had the horses to drive he handled 
them as competently' as any other man could have 
done. As a conditioner and trainer he had few 
equals, and as a man he was universally liked and 
admired. Probably the fastest pacer he ever trained 
was What, and his two best trotters would be Vaunt 
and Velox, all champions. 

Albaugh was always a hard-working, energetic 
trainer, and took his defeats better than any man I 
ever knew. He was a horseman of the highest type, 
and in his young days gave evidence of the qualities 
which distinguished him throughout his life. Always 
neat and careful about his own dross and appearance, 
he gave the same attention to his charges and equip- 
ments. His outfits were always spick and span, and 
attracted the admiration of all race goers. He was 
a man who would have been a credit to any profes- 
sion he could have chosen. He was naturally fond 
of horses. His love for them asserted itself when 
he was a boy, and he appreciated the trotter at Its 
true worth. I think he was a man of extraordinary 
ability, for I know the conditions be oft labored un- 
der were not always those conducive to success. 

During the time I have known him our relations, 
always friendly, were such as to afford many oppor- 
tunities for observing and studying his character and 
abilities, which were in many ways original and 
unique. Many pleasant hours have 1 spent in listen- 
ing to him relating his experiences on the trotting 
turf in this country and America. Many of his say- 
ings were truly original and witty, and ho spoke with 
that Southern accent (which colonial life had some- 
what sandpapered and oiled down a bit) which made 
him nice to listen to. 

While he was prominent in the front ranks of trot- 
ting horsemen as a trainer and driver, he was pre- 
eminent in the ranks of those noted for integrity 
In all business and social relations, and had a scru- 
pulous appreciation of honesty in al Ithings concern- 
ing racing. 



He was a man of many friends and few enemies, 
a thorough gentleman in appearance and at heart, 
and during his long career on the trotting tracks 1 
don't think he was ever accused of anything that was 
not strictly above board. 

On the trotting tracks of New Zealand his presence 
will be greatly missed, but, I trust, kindly remem- 
bered. His early death will be exceedingly regretted, 
and I, with all other trotting horsemen, extend my 
sincere sympathy to his wife. "May he rest in 
peace," will be the farewell wish of all who knew 
the "Grand Old Man." 

o 

IMPROVEMENTS AT STATE FAIR GROUNDS. 



Seventy thousand dollars are asked in appropria- 
tions for improvements at the State Agricultural 
Park at Sacramento in four bills introduced into the 
Assembly this week by Johnson of Sacramento. 

A new machinery hall is provided for in Bill No. 
615, for which an appropriation of $30,000 is asked. 
The use to which the building will be put is minutely 
recited. It will contain concrete tanks for the re- 
ception of water that pumps and pumping machinery 
may be demonstrated in the hall. 

It shall also have accommodations for all kinds of 
exhibits in machinery, vehicles and agricultural imple- 
ments. 

A new pumping plant for the Agricultural Park, 
with the various accessory appliances is provided in 
Bill No. 614, which carries an appropriation of $10,- 
000. 

This bill provides that suitable wells shall be bored 
on the grounds of the park, aud that pumps and pump- 
ing machinery should be installed for the accommoda- 
tion of exhibitors and employes. 

The appropriation is sufficient to defray the cost of 
constructing concrete tanks that shall be high 
enough to give sufficient pressure to the water sup- 
ply to make it effective for fire and irrigation pur- 
poses. 

An appropriation carrying $10,000 is provided in 
Bill No. 613, for the erection of an agricultural pavil- 
ion aud manufacturers' pavilion. These buildings 
shall be erected under the direction of the State 
Engineer. 

For the leveling of the infield and other grounds 
at the State Agricultural Park that they may be 
sown to grass or alfalfa, $10,000 is asked. This 
amount also carries with it the repairing of the grand 
stand and the painting and repairing of the horse 
and cattle barns as well as other buildings. 

o 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HORSE SHOW. 



Secretary-Treasurer E. D. Neff of the Southern Cal- 
ifornia Horse Show Association, of Pasadena, writes: 
"The prospects for our show are becoming brighter 
every day. We have changed our dates to March 9tn, 
10th, 11th and 12th, to accommodate those wish- 
ing to attend our show and the Coronado Tourna- 
ment, which will begin March 13th instead of March 
20th. We will have a four-day show, the first day be- 
ing devoted to polo classes and to a match game of 
polo between Mr. Mackey's English team and the San 
Mateo team. The Association will offer a cup valued 
at $500, for the match. We hope the exhibition by 
the polo teams will result in the formation of a 
local polo club, for which there is ample material 
in this city. Our prize list will be issued in a few 
days. In our last show we had thirty classes of 
harness, saddle and draft horses and ponies. This 
year we will have fifty-four classes." 

o 

GRAND CIRCUIT DATES. 



Grand Circuit racing will commence this year at 
Detroit as usual, during the last week in July, and 
close at Columbus, Ohio, October 1st. There are 
nine tracks in the circuit, and as Columbus will 
give two weeks there will be ten weeks of racing 
before the closing at Lexington where the meeting 
extends over ten days. The circuit is arranged as 
follows: 

Detroit, Mich., July 26-30. 

Kalamazoo, Mich., Aug. 2-6. 

North Randall O. (Cleveland), Aug. 9-13. 

Buffalo, N. Y. (Fort Erie), Aug. 16-20. 

I'oughkeepsio, N. Y., Aug. 23-27. 

Long Branch, N. J., Aug. 30-Sept. 3. 

Hartford, Conn., Sept. 6-10. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 13-17. 

Columbus, O., Sept. 20-Oct. 1. 

o 

Plans are being considered by the management of 
the trotting track at. Peoria. 111., for a harness race 
at the Great Western Circuit, meeting in July which 
would put the $50,000 handicap at Boston in the 
shade. Amasa Corbin, a wealthy horseman of Conv- 
enient-, N. Y.. has offered to finance the enterprise 
by giving as a prize the Murray Isle Hotel, located at 
Murray Isle, N. Y.. and valued at. $100,000. In addi- 
tion to this big prize to the winner of the race he 
would give twelve prizes of $1,5(10 each to the win 
ners of twelve elimination races preliminary to the 
main contest and $4,600 to horses finishing behind the 
winner in the final. Should his plans be carried out 
entries will probably close on March 1st. The fee will 
be $300, payable In three monthly installments. 



There is talk of an amateur driving club at Salinas, 
and we hope it. will be organized. There are many 
fast trotters and pacers owned In that vicinity anil 
no track in California is kept in better shape than 
the one under the management, of Charles Whitehead. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



I NOTES AND NEWS 

State Fair Futurity closes Monday next. 



$10 is due and payable Tuesday next on all foals 
in Breeders Futurity No. 8. 



It is said there are three hundred trotters and 
pacers being broken or trained at Agricultural Park, 
Los Angeles, at the present time. 



May Day falls on Saturday this year and the dif- 
ferent tracks where May Day harness racing is held, 
are preparing to give an extra good program. 



The 2:10 mares are beginning to show up well in 
the list of dams of new standard performers. In the 
list for 1098, there are eighteen 2:10 mares repre- 
sented. 



Ella M. R. 2:16% as a two-year -old, and eligible 
to the Pacific Breeders Futurity this year, will be 
sold with the Nutwood Stock Farm horses at the 
Pleasanton sale, March 25th. 



Monday next is the date of closing nominations in 
the California State Fair Futurity for foals of mares 
bred in 1908. It only costs $2 to nominate your mare. 
See advertisement in this paper. 



One of the coming great world sires is Zolock 
2:05%. He is the sire of six in the 2:10 list, and 
one of the best bred McKinneys living. He is in 
the stud at Los Angeles this year. 



Major Delmar 1:59% will never be seen in the 
regular races again. His owner has announced the 
permanent retirement of the second two-minute-trot- 
ter. He was a great horse in his day and has earned 
his rest. 



Among the Eastern horsemen who have been in 
San Francisco during the iiast week are Mr. W. H. 
Albaugh, former owner of Wilton 2:19%, and Mr. A. 
T. Cole, proprietor of the Cole Stock Farm, of 
Wheaton, 111. 



The second annual Pleasanton sale will be the 
greatest horse sale ever held in California, and will 
draw the greatest crowd of buyers ever seen in the 
State. If you want to sell good ones, this is the time 
and place to do it. 



Zombro 2:11 will leave California on April 1st. 
If you have a mare you can send to him before that 
time, it would be a wise thing to do to have her 
bred to this great sire before he leaves the State, 
as he may never return. 



There is a payment of $10 due Tuesday next, 
February 2d, on yearlings, foals of 1908, that are 
entered in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity, $7,250 
guaranteed. Don't allow the date for this payment 
to pass without making it. 



All the horses on the famous Nutwood Stock Farm, 
owned by the estate of Martin Carter, will be sold 
by Fred Chase & Co., at Pleasanton on Thursday, 
March 25th. This is the greatest collection of trot- 
ting bred stock in California. 



My Star 2:03%, the pacer owned by John and 
Lottie Crabtree, and the latter's favorite horse, fell 
on the ice and broke his leg at Boston on January 
16th, and had to be destroyed. My Star was one of 
the sensational pacers of 1906. 



The horses on the low lands along the Sacramento 
were all driven to high ground as soon as the river 
began to rise, and there were very few animals 
reported lost during the floods that have prevailed 
during the past two weeks. 



The great pacing stallion of 1908, Charley D. 2:06% 
will make the season of 1909 at Pleasanton race 
track. Full particulars will be found in the adver- 
tisement next week. Charley D. is a McKinney, 
and a better made one never stepped on a track . 



Every horseman that has looked the pacer Velox 
2:09% over since he reached Pleasanton has pro- 
nounced him a mighty good-looking race horse, and 
Ted Hayes is receiving congratulations on every side 
for having such a prospect for a 2:04 horse in his 
string. 



The San Diego track is having a new coating of 
soil put on it, and it is proposed to give a meeting 
there this summer. A guarantee of $10,000 will be 
raised for purses, which will be mostly $1,000 each. 
If Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside and Santa 
Ana should join in, a good circuit could be arranged. 



Mr. W. H. Mason, of Los Angeles, who purchased 
the filly Alma Lou, by Kinney Lou, dam Alma 2:26% 
by Messenger Almont, and Susie G. by Greco B., dam 
Susie by Directum 2:05%, at the Brace-Doble sale, 
writes that he is much pleased with them and is 
taking steps to have both registered. Alma Lou is 
eligible under rule 1, but the other filly cannot be 
registered until she has produced two standard per- 
formers, although her breeding is first class as her 
second dam is by Bell Alta. 



Romeo, the James Madison trotter owned by Wil- 
liam Garland of Los Angeles is very highly thought 
of by the trotting horse experts of the southern 
metropolis. Romeo has trotted a mile in 2: 10% and 
did it in such a manner that he is looked upon as a 
2:08 trotter. Walter Maben has him in charge. 



Henry Busing has secured a nomination in Pacific 
Breeders Futurity No. 8, for Search Pointer, his 
colt by Star Pointer out of Record Searcher by 
Searchlight, that he recently purchased at Nutwood 
Stock Farm, and he has also refused more than 
twice the amount he gave for the colt. 



Work on the new racing plant of the Cleveland 
Driving Park company, at North Randall, goes 
steadily on. The track is completed and workmen 
are working on the barns. This activity will be 
continued all winter so that the improvements may 
be as far along as possible when spring opens. 



The Chico Driving Club will hold a fair and race 
meeting this year and will make every effort to make 
it a big success. The Chico track is considered to be 
the best appointed trotting track in California and 
the probability is that the 2:08 of Berta Mac and 
2:06% of Charlie D. will be beaten this year at Chico. 



As soon as it was known that Kinney Lou 2:07% 
would make the season at Salinas, six finely bred 
mares were booked to the son of McKinney by dif- 
ferent owners who reside in that section. There are 
many good mares owned in the Salinas valley and 
Kinney Lou will have a good season there. 



At the Denver horse show two weeks ago, Geo. A. 
Estabrook took first prize for single trotters with 
his new purchase, Denver, and second prize in the 
same class with his horse Silver Band. Mr. Esta- 
brook will go down the Grand Circuit again this 
year with a splendid string of trotters and pacers. 



Jacob Brolliar writes us that Mr. Frank J. Hellen 
of Penn Grove, California, has accepted his chal- 
lenge printed last week and that as soon as the pa- 
pers governing the conditions can be made out they 
will be forwarded to the Breeder and Sportsman 
for publication. May the best colt win. 



W. L. Spears of Hickory Wood Farm, Lexington, 
Ky., has decided to race the speedy pacer Shake- 
spear (3) 2:09% again this year. He has not made 
up his mind who shall campaign him, but there is a 
possibility that he will be put into the hands of Gus 
Macey to travel down the big line along with the 
Estabrook stars. 



The Chicago Horse Review's "Calendar of Cham- 
pions" for 1909 has been received and is a very hand- 
some thing. It consists of twelve large sheets 21x14 
inches, on each of which is a calendar for the month 
and a half-tone engraving of a leading trotter or 
pacer. It is sent from the Horse Review office post- 
paid for 50 cents. 



The announcement that Lottie Lynwood, the full 
sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05%, will be sold at the 
second annual Pleasanton sale has started several 
persons figuring as to just how high they can afford 
to go to get her. The bidding will be lively when 
she is led into the ring, as she is wanted by more 
than one good buyer. 



The Arabian stallions of El Rancho de las Rosas 
are standing for a service fee of $50 this year. While 
these stallions were on exhibition at the California 
State Fair and in this city, they were greatly ad- 
mired for their beauty and docility. Some fine mares 
will be sent to them this year, by a number of our 
wealthiest horse owners. 



The McKinney stallion Kinney Rose is getting 
very handsome colts, and very fast ones. Few Mc- 
Kinney stallions have anything on Kinney Rose in 
speed, conformation, blood lines or anything else 
that helps make a great sire. Kinney Rose will be 
at Chico this year and his services should be in de- 
mand and doubtless will be. 



Athasham 2:09% is a horse that breeders must 
not overlook. He is one of the stout, rugged sort, 
that is most necessary in the production of horses 
with stamina. His speed is greater than his record; 
in fact he has been timed a mile in 2:06% in a race, 
and his courage is unquestioned. At $25 his services 
are certainly on the bargain counter this year. 



Don't ever get it into your head that there are not 
many high class stallions in California. Get our 
stallion number which will be out February 27tn and 
you will find that this State still has a list of stal- 
lions in service that rank with those of any State in 
the Union. California has not quit producing cham- 
pion trotters and pacers by any means. 



Amateur harness racing will have quite a boom in 
Butte, Montana, this year. There was much enthu- 
siasm for the sport in Butte last summer, but the 
Butte Driving Club has decided to make the season 
of 1909 still more interesting. The club proposes to 
pay its secretary a salary and he will devote much 
time to perfecting arrangements for meetings and 
attending to details. Maurice Fitzharris is the newly 
elected president of the club. J. H. Turner was 
elected vice-president, T. H. Emory secretary -treas- 
urer, Spence Hireen, Frank Walker, Dr. E. C. Smet- 
ters and Thomas Scadden directors. 



Sentinel Wilkes, by George Wilkes, dam Satinette, 
by Sentinel, was put to death on December 15th at 
Iluntsville, Ala. He was foaled in 1882 and was the 
sire of 25 in the standard list. 



Alta Nola 2:20, the mare that Captain Williams, 
of Palo Alto, is advertising for sale as a broodmare, 
is in foal to Unimak, own brother to Sterling Mc- 
Kinney 2:06%. Alta Nola is ten years old, sound as 
a new dollar, and is fast enough to train and race. 
She took her record after very limited training and 
can beat it several seconds. She is a bargain at 
the price Capt. Williams offers her for. 



The citizens of Livermore, in Alameda county, 
are making preparations for the annual horse parade 
that has been made such a success in that town. 
An effort is to be made to make the parade and show 
this year better than ever before, and the outlook is 
for more and better horses to be shown than last 
year. Some of the best draft and trotting stock 
on the Coast is owned within a radius of 50 miles 
of Livermore. 



If your horse is not doing as well as you think he 
should from the amount of feed he is getting, perhaps 
his teeth need attention. Many a horse is unable to 
properly grind his grain because a long tooth keeps 
the grinders too far apart to do the work. Ira B. 
Dalziel, whose office is at 620 Octavia street, and 
whose phone number is Special 2074, can fix up your 
horse's mouth so that he can get the good out of his 
feed. 



From Memphis, Tenn., comes a press dispatch say- 
ing that "at the ripe old age of 106 years, James 
Gibson, who rode for Andrew Jackson at Nashville 
in the memorable race between Plowboy and Trux- 
ton, is dead. This race is said to have caused the 
controversy between Gen. Jackson and Gen. Dickin- 
son that resulted in the famous duel between those 
gentlemen. The deceased was generally conceded to 
be the oldest living jockey in the world." 



Baron Rogers 2:09%, formerly owned at Forbes 
Farm but that was exported to Russia a dozen years 
or more ago, is making a remarkable showing in the 
land of the Czar. Since going there he has sired 
eighty-four living foals, sixty-four of which have 
started in races. Of these forty-three have beaten 
2:30, a dozen have gone in 2:20 and three below 
2:15. The first of his get began to race in 1902 and 
up to the close of 1908 it is figured that they won in 
the aggregate, over 700,000 rubles. 



Budd Doble, who will be at Salinas this year with 
his great McKinney stallion, Kinney Lou 2:07%, 
announces that he will nominate every mare bred to 
his stallion this year in every futurity on the Pacific 
Coast. These include the Pacific Breeders' Futurity, 
$7,000; the California State Fair Futurity, $5,000; 
the Oregon Futurity, $5,000; the Portland Futurity, 
$5,000, and the Los Angeles Futurity, $5,000. These 
nominations will be made by Mr. Doble, free of all 
expense to the owner. 



Wells Fargo & Co. of San Francisco desire to 
secure information of the whereabouts if alive, or 
the date and place of death, of Hugh Stevenson, 
who was at one time interested in the breeding and 
racing of horses in this country. He showed a saddle 
horse known as Black Prince at the New York 
horse show in 1886. Any information in regard to 
Mr. Stevenson will be thankfully received by A. 
Christeson, vice-president and general manager of 
Wells Fargo & Co., this city. 



Rapidan Dillon, the mare that Walter Maben is 
working at Los Angeles, is considered one of the 
best prospects for a fast trotter in California. She 
is very fashionably bred, being by Sidney Dillon, dam 
By By by Nutwood, second dam the dam of Lock- 
heart 2:08%. by Dictator, third dam by Edwin For- 
rest, etc. Rapidan Dillon comes from a line of pro- 
ducing dams, and as she has better than two-minute 
speed, should be worth considerable for a brood 
mare after she gets a low mark. 



The stallion Walter Barker 36660, several of whose 
produce have been entered in the Coast stakes during 
the past two years by Walter Maben, is a royally 
bred horse. Walter Barker is a bay, foaled 1902, by 
Heir-at-Law 2:05% (sire of Minor Heir 1:59%), dam 
Jane Johns by Axtell (3) 2:12, second dam Grace 
Lee 2:29% by Electioneer, third dam Addie Lee, dam 
of four in the list, by Culver's Black Hawk, fourth 
dam Old Nancy by Morrill 850. Walter Barker's get 
at Los Angeles are all young, but they are said to be 
very promising. 



Just prior to the rainstorm which has prevailed 
for the past three weeks, many loads of new soil 
were placed on the first turn of the Pleasanton track, 
and the continuous downpour prevented it from 
packing. That portion of the track which was not re- 
soiled was dry enough last Monday for horses to 
work at two-minute speed if necessary, and the foot- 
ing was fine. A few days of dry weather will cause 
the loose dirt on the turn to pack, however, and the 
entire mile will be in shape for fast work. The 
Pleasanton track has no equal any place in California 
or elsewhere, for winter work. There are other good 
winter tracks in California which keep in fine shape 
if the horses are kept off during and a day or so 
after a rain storm, but at Pleasanton horses can be 
worked on good footing even though the rain falls 
at the rate of an inch a day. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



J 



J. S. Phippen has a well bred, standard and reg- 
istered McKinney stallion for sale. This horse is 
registered as Colonel Dailey 39806. He is a rich bay, 
six years old, and is out of the mare Dixie by Charles 
Derby 2:20, sire of six in 2:10, second dam Ramona, 
dam of W. Wood 2:07, by Anteeo 2:16%, son of Elec- 
tioneer and sire dam of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, Directum 
Kelly 2:08%, etc., third dam, the dam of Cres- 
cent 2:23%, by Capt. Webster, sire dam of Sidney 
Dillon, sire of Lou Dillon 1:58%. Colonel Dailey 
has never been trained, but is a fast natural trotter. 
See advertisement. 



At a meeting of the directors of the Riverside 
Driving Club held on the 18th inst., steps were taken 
to hold a horse show in that city on the first day of 
May. H. P. Zimmerman was made a committee of 
one to have the preliminary arrangements in charge. 
There will be cash prizes and ribbons for horses in 
all classes. The entries are to include draft ani- 
mals, gentlemen s driving horses, racing horses, 
mares with colts, and classifications for the entry of 
horseflesh of every description. The Riverside Driv- 
ing Club is deserving of every encouragement in the 
undertaking which they have in hand. 



Aunt Jerusha 2:08%, the trotting mare by Dic- 
tator Wilkes 5231, son of Red Wilkes, traces twice 
to the Chas. Kent mare, dam of Hambletonian 10, on 
her dam's side. Her first dam is Doneta by Davenant 
1095, second dam Donna by Orange Duroc 1413, third 
dam Fanny Bashaw by Bashaw 50 (whose grandam 
was the Chas. Kent mare), fourth dam Tempie Ab- 
dallah by Gifford Morgan Jr., fifth dam Belle, dam 
of Bashaw 50, by Webber's Tom Thumb, sixth dam 
Chas. Kent mare by imported Bellfounder. Aunt 
Jerusha took her record in 1908, having reduced it 
from 2:10% made the year before. 



Says the San Luis Obispo Tribune: "The San 
Luis Driving Club set a good example to the rest of 
the State on the occasion of the two race meets given 
under its auspices. The races were a success and a 
good crowd turned out on both occasions to enjoy the 
sport. No pool selling nor betting was allowed on 
the track. The sport was of the good wholesome 
kind that interests the people in the breeding of 
good horses, while at the same time not encouraging 
the vile influences that wreck human lives at Em- 
eryville and Arcadia.'' 



F. E. Emlay, of Oroville, is in receipt of a letter 
from his friend, Sam Norris, who is still at King 
Hill Stock Farm in Missouri, with Washington Mc- 
Kinney 2:17%, who says Mr. Donovan, the horse's 
new owner, has him drive Washington every day 
that it does not snow, and adds that it is 15 degrees 
below zero, with ice ten inches thick. Sam says 
Washington McKinney has a fine home and will be 
bred to a grand lot of mares. The people there 
think him the finest specimen of a trotting sire they 
have ever seen. Norris will probably bring a stud 
colt to California from King Hill Farm on his own 
hook when he returns. 



One of the best bred McKinney stallions that will 
be in service this year is T. W. Barstow's Nearest 
McKinney, and as he is a grand looking horse and a 
very fast trotter, having shown a mile in 2:15 over a 
half-mile track with the last half in 1:04, there can 
be no doubt of his capability to sire speed and other 
desirable qualities. With two crosses to Nutwood 
on his dam's side, his sire the greatest of 2:10 sires, 
the sire of his dam a 2:10 sire, his second dam the 
dam of a 2:13%, race trotter, and his third dam carry- 
ing the blood close up of Electioneer and Geo. M. 
Patchen Jr., few stallions have so many speed pro- 
ducing crosses in their pedigrees. Mr. Barstow will 
keep this horse at his stables on Alameda avenue in 
San Jose for the ensuing season at a fee of $50 with 
usual return privilege. 



Sonoma Girl 2:05% will be wintered by Dick 
McMahan, at Libertyville, 111. McMahan got along 
so well with the daughter of Lynwood W., after he 
took her early last fall that the Crabtrees have con- 
cluded that the Illinois man will be able to do as 
much with her as anyone, consequently, will leave 
her with him to race in 1909. McMahon, by the way, 
has taken his place in the front rank of successful 
trainers, and although he has not had the assistance 
of a large number of high-class horses to assist him 
in his climb to the top of the ladder. He has al- 
ways trained a public stable and has taken such 
horses as he could get, and generally, until the 
last two years, he got what the more famous trainers 
did not want. In spite of adverse conditions, Mc- 
Mahan has steadily advanced in the estimation of 
the public and just now it would be hard to select 
any trainer and driver who outclasses him very 
much. His wonderful campaigns with Citation 
2:01%, a mare that had been pronounced a rank 
failure when he got her, have been the talk of the 
harness racing world. Last season he also had Red 
Bow 2:04%; Star Patch 2:04%; Leone 2:06%; Brace 
Girdle 2:09% and other good ones, and he trained 
and raced them in a way to make them profitable 
to their owners. Sonoma Girl was good when she 
was turned over to him, but she improved so that 
she equaled her record twice and when she reached 
Phoenix, Ariz., she was probably better than ever 
before. In McMahon's hands she will, doubtless, 
be a big factor in the classes for 2:05 trotters next 
season, and both Hamburg Belle 2:04% and Jack 
Leyburn 2:04%, will have to be in the best of form 
to beat her when the famous trio meet. 



MINISTERS AND GOOD HORSES. 

A minister of the Gospel who really loves a good 
horse is sure to be a good preacher. Henry Ward 
Beecher was one of that stamp; so were W. H. Mur- 
ray, Rev. Reuben Thomas, Rev. T. H. Hendrick and a 
host of other broad-minded clergymen. It is seldom 
that a minister writes for a turf paper, yet the Rev. 
D. V. Polling of The Dalles, Oregon, did so for the 
Rural Spirit of Portland, that State. It is as fol- 
lows: 

"I have a feeling that you were in the wrong pew, 
when you requested me to write for your Christmas 
issue of the Spirit, but nevertheless it is with pleas- 
ure that I accede to your wish. The subject is one 
that is more often elucidated, by professional horse- 
men, than by the clergy. In fact, I do not recall 
ever having heard it used as a topic for discussion 
from the pulpit (?). Perhaps others have. How- 
ever, I fail to see why any one class should hold a 
monopoly in this matter, any more than in any other 
realm. 

"The subject cannot be so limited, I am sure that 
in numberless instances the 'Standard Bred' has 
proved himself the friend and loyal helper of the 
dominie,' as well as the friend of the man of the 
sulky and time chronometer. I am free to acknowl- 
edge that from my boyhood days I have been a 'lover 
of the horse,' and no type has so called out my ad- 
miration as has the American trotter. Other breeds 
at various times have held the boards; the trotter 
has been relegated to an inferior and humbler posi- 
tion; the tides have ebbed and flowed for or against 
him; the bicycle and the automobile run him off the 
'pike,' but like the brook of which the poet has 
sung, while others have come and gone, the light-har- 
ness horse has gone on and is destined to go on for- 
ever. Today, as at no previous period in the history 
of the trotter, he is coming into his own, and his 
place will not be taken from him. 

"It has been for my pleasure and health a boon to 
have owned and driven a few good individuals of 
this breed and from the time when a mere boy, 
taken by my father, himself a clergyman, to see the 
Ohio State Fair races during the fall of 1872 until 
the present day, I have taken my stand with the real 
friends of the 'Standard Bred.' 

"The history of the trotter is most honorable. He 
has shared alike in man's prosperity and adversity; 
from his legitimate earnings as a race machine, 
hundreds of children have been clothed and schooled 
and helped on the way to manhood and womanhood; 
homes have been furnished and maintained; and life, 
for great numbers, has been made worth while. 

"And while 'tis true his splendid powers have been 
prostituted, it has been due to the inferior man, not 
the superior horse, and properly conducted, the rac- 
ing business is not only equally honorable with other 
business, but lucrative as well; and, if we read aright 
the signs of the times, it is destined to become more 
so in the future years. I for one feel like commend- 
ing the manly and intelligent contention of the Rural 
Spirit, on behalf of clean sport, and honorable rivalry 
in the racing of the Northwest Circuit. 

'Harness racing as we have come to patronize it, 
and conduct it in recent years, is in very truth 'The 
Sport of Kings.' Give the public a 'horse race' and 
there need be no apprehension as to lack of support. 

"It may sound like 'froth and fury, signifying 
nothing' to state, that the breeding and development 
of the trotter, affects not only the material prosperity 
of the community, but the intellectual and moral as 
well, and yet I am sure such is the case. There is 
no virtue in driving four miles an hour when one 
can drive twelve miles an hour. A man is no more 
religious at a six-minute gait, than when driving at 
a forty gait. In fact, to the average wide-awake man. 
it is not conducive to religious reflection and spirit- 
ual culture to be unable to road fast enough to keep 
out of the dust of every horseman who drives the 
highway. As Josh Billings once said: 'Human natur' 
is human natur''; and some people possess more of 
it than others,' and it is a principle ingrained in 
the constitution of man, to resent taking another 
man's dust if he can avoid it. The 'trotter' requires 
intelligent care; he is so finely constructed that he 
dare not to be neglected, if he is to maintain his ef- 
ficiency. It is the intelligent horseman who best suc- 
ceeds in the game today. The breeding and devel- 
opment of the trotter places a premium upon brains. 
The close of each season makes clear this truth. The 
inapt or dull cannot succeed here, and one of the 
hopeful features connected with this industry is the 
splendid character of the men who are in the front 
ranks of the game today. 

"No friend of man in the animal realm with the 
possible exception of the dog. is so quick and withal 
so accurate in the diagnosis of a trainer's character 
as is the horse of warm blood — thoroughbred or 
standard bred. I am satisfied that this will not be 
successfully contradicted. The dissipated, immoral 
trainer is the losing trainer in the last analysis. His 
person and presence to the sensitive horse ,is as 
a 'red flag before the monarch of the herd.' I have 
had occasion to state this fact many times. Excep- 
tions there are to be sun; to all rules, but these do 
not In any way weaken the general principle. The 
trotter is a keen reader of character and is, when ac- 
corded his face value, a factor in the intellectual 
and moral status of the community. 

"I know one 'dominie' at least who has dissipated 
more than one attack of physical and moral billions 
ness and consequent moroseness, by casting aside? the 
ordinary tools of labor, and by hitching his game 
roadster to cart or buggy, and seeking out a place 
to 'brush' a '40' and in a few hours, return, with 
pulses bounding and spirits exhilarated, the whole 
man alive with wholesome thoughts and feelings. In 



love with the world, its men and its women, life 
worth while, and people worth loving. So I count 
among the many blessings given us to help us live 
as men should live, the American trotter. Long may 
he continue and his life increase." 

o 

DEATH OF WALTER F. KILPATRICK. 



The many friends of Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick in 
California, will regret to learn that his brother. 
Walter F. Kilpatrick died at his home in New Jer- 
sey on the 13th instant, after an illness of two years. 
In the Trotter and Pacer of January 21st, we find 
the followin: 

Walter F. Kilpatrick, referred to above, died on 
Wednesday, January 13, at the home of his sister, 
Mrs. J. Boyce Smith, Woodcliff Lake, Bergen county, 
N. J., after a lingering illness. He had been in 
poor health for over two years and had been urged 
by his friends to seek a more salubrious climate in 
the hope that a cure might be effected, but with in- 
domitable will and rare courage he persisted in keep- 
ing his hand on the tiller of his complicated busi- 
ness affairs and practically died there. He was born 
in 1851 in New York City; removed to Newburgh, 
N. Y., in 1868, and graduated from the Newburgh 
Academy in 1867. He studied law at Columbia Law 
School and was admitted to the bar in 1873. He 
never practiced law, but joined his father, the late 
Thomas Kilpatrick, in the building business and con- 
tinued with him until 1878, when he became engaged 
in the lumber business with his brother, Frank J., 
and James A. Roberts, under the firm name of Kil- 
patrick & Co. This firm was dissolved in 1889 and 
since that time he has been engaged in the lumber 
business at Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth streets and 
Eleventh avenue, this city. His father was one of 
the oldest road drivers in New York and bred and 
owned many fast trotting horses, among which were 
Highland Boy, by Hamlet; Winfield Scott, by Ed- 
ward Everett; Sir Walter, by Aberdeen; Bonnie 
Doon (dam of Nutbreaker), and many others. Walter 
himself owned Lady Winfield, dam of Sir Walter, and 
drove her on the road for years. He leaves a widow, 
one son and one daughter. His son, Walter Ken- 
neth Kilpatrick, is a midshipman in the United 
States Navy and is now in Manila. His daughter, 
Margery is a sophomore in Smith College, Northamp- 
ton, Mass. 

o 

ANOTHER CHALLENGE. 



Woodland, California, Jan. 28th, 1909. 

Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal.: I 
see in the issue of January 23d that Mr. Jacob 
Brolliar of Visalia has a yearling trotter which he 
wishes to race. Evidently he has a mighty good 
colt, and from its breeding it should be, as its sire 
Best Policy is one of the very best bred stallions on 
the Pacific Coast. Of course we cannot meet the 
conditions named in his challenge, our colt being 
foaled a little earlier than April, but Dorothy Ansel 
is a yearling and I would like to see her trot this 
fall, and will race her against any yearling on the 
Pacific Coast under the following conditions: 

Race to be a mile dash. Race to be held either 
over the Woodland, Chico or Santa Rosa track. The 
track that will give the most money for the race 
being preferred. Entrance to close March 1, 1909, 
to be free to all yearling trotters to enter. Race to 
be for $250 a corner, winner take all. Entrance to 
be paid as follows: $50 March 1st, 1909, $50 May 
1st, 1909, and $150 August 1st, 1909. The race to 
be trotted between the first day of September, 1909, 
and the first day of November, 1909. Payments not 
made when due will forfeit, all previous payments. 
Yours truly, 

C. A. SPENCER, 
Manager Woodland Stock Farm. 
o 

A. I. Barber of Mason, Mich., owner of Greenbacks, 
that died last summer, has secured a new stallion 
which he believes will prove; equally as valuable to 
the horse breeders of that section. The colt, named 
Alexander McGregor, is sired by Cresceus, the cham- 
pion trotting stallion, dam a mare with a record of 
2:24, and the dam of a colt with a record of 2:11. 
The colt stands 16 hands tall, is a handsome bay in 
color, and Mr. Barber says he is one of the finest- 
gaited horses he ever saw, with a pure trotting action. 
With no training the colt shows better than a 2:30 
gait, and next summer he will be introduced to track 
work. 

o ■ 

\ PROFIT of $i]t(i.oo. 
Made l>v ,1. Dlckeraon, Fori Wnynr, lull. 

Mr. Dlckorson writes January 5th. lflOfl, as follows: 
"I am using ABSORRINK on my pacer and H is worth 
Its weight In gold, 1 bought him in July, after ho got 
hurt in a race, for a $10.00 bill, am) am now offered 
$500.00 for him at any time." 

Lameness. Bruises, Strains, Swellings or Inflamma- 
tion !n the muscle or loints respond quickly to 
\RSORRINi;. $2.00 a I I,, at druggists, or sent post- 
paid on receipt of price. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. P. F.. 51 Monmouth St.. Spring- 
field, Mass. 



SICKNESS \mo\<; HORSES 

In this era of very high values proves at all times 
very serious Distemper, coughs, pinkeye and the In- 
fluenza troubles are to he unaided against constant- 
ly In midwinter. A tonic which keeps away the (form 
troubles, such as Craft's Distemper Cure, sold gener- 
ally by druggists, should he (riven regularly to horses 
of all ages with the fond. II the tonic is neglected, the 
remedy Is guaranteed to cure or money paid for It will 
be refunded on request. Horsemen so situated as not 
to buy conveniently of the trade, may order direct at 
the regular price, prepaid, from I). R. NEWKLL, 50 
Bayo Vista Ave., Oakland, Cal., Pacific Coast Agent. 



i 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



0000000©0»CX>©<>0©©^ 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. De W ITT. 



WHEN GEESE WERE PLENTY. 



(By Ananias.) 

"When you see the sandhill cranes corkscrewing 
along the Sierra Madre," said an old duck hunter, 
"you can put it in your pipe that the duck season 
will be on soon." I saw them yesterday over on my 
ranch in the San Gabriel, and to-day I shot my first 
duck, and there you are. But duck shooting ain't 
what it was," he continued. "When I first came to 
California in the early '50s I married a wife whose 
father had a 50,000 acre grain ranch, and I started 
in as a gooseman. Guess you never heard of that 
word. I never did before. I was the bookkeeper 
of the ranch, and the item that paralyzed me on 
those books was 'Cartridges for the season of 1858, 

L'ii, ; Mexicans and Indians to shoot geese. 260.' I 

thought it was a joke, but I mighty soon found my 
mistake, as after the first rain in the Sacramento 
Valley and the green began to spring up the old man 
had to hire an army of at least 300, and I enlisted. 

"Everybody turned out; not shooting geese. Lord 
bless you! No, just scaring them off the green 
fields. Why, I rode out one morning just before the 
crops came on, and I thought it had been snowing; 
as far as I could see the ground was covered with 
white geese. A ranch wouldn't have had a show five 
minutes with them, and you wouldn't believe me if I 
told you the amount of amunition used on that 
ranch in ten years; it was as much as is used in some 
wars. As soon as the planting began we went on 
duty, just like soldiers. Thirty went out for four 
hours and then were relieved, and so on all night. 
We didn't shoot a goose; just fired over them with 
all kinds of guns, anything that would make a noise, 
trying to drum them off. But when they rose in one 
place they settled in another. Sometimes we started 
in to kill them, and once we used an old howitzer to 
scare them; but they got so used to it that it was a 
fight to save the grain from them. 

"They watched the men plant, and if left alone 
they'd have the seeds out before they started to 
sprout, and only the efforts of two or three hundred 
men all night and all day for weeks saved some of the 
big wheat fields in those days. I remember one night. 
It was raining and I was setting on my horse with 
three new goosemen who had just arrived. Sud- 
denly we began to hear the 'honk,' 'honk.' Louder 
it grew, and as it was foggy you couldn't see a 
thing. Down from the air came the most awful 
sounds coupled with a rush of wings. A Mexican in 
the outfit fell off his horse and got on his knees; 
he was just scared stiff — thought the end of all 
things had come. Then when the roar got so loud 
that our horses began to stampede, down out of the 
fog dropped about a million geese. It was like a 
snowstorm, with 20-pound flakes. All the horses ran 
or bucked the new men off and then the geese, of 
course, saw us and — well, it was Hades for a few 
minutes. One man was hit by a goose and knocked 
completely out of his saddle. Two had geese alight 
on their horses and they were so thick that when 
a big honker landed on the back of my horse she let 
fly behind her and struck a goose that was just alight- 
ing and killed. Why, pardner, you wouldn't believe 
half of it, if I should sit down and talk goose with 
you. I've stood on a little rise of land and seen the 
country for miles covered with geese so that you 
would have taken your oath that the country was 
covered with snow. 

"It was discouraging, heartbreaking for the origi- 
nal grain men up in Glenn and other counties, 
and the big men offered all kinds of money to any one 
who would invent some scheme to scare geese. We 
couldn't kill them. There wasn't people enough in 
the State to eat the geese two hundred men could kill 
in a night if we started in. So the only thing to do 
was to ride around yelling and shooting. One Yank 
who had come out from Nantucket had an old watch- 
man's rattle with him that his grandfather used in 
the Revolution to scare Indians, I reckon. When he 
gave it a whirl you thought fifty volts had hit you. 
The old man had a hundred made from the original 
model, he thought that they would clean out the 
birds, and I reckon they cost him $10 a piece. The 
night we charged the geese whirling them rattlers 
I shall never forget long's I live. In the first place 
the snap or click almost scared the California horses 
to death. Half of the mustangs ran away and all the 
new men, the tenderfeet, got bucked off, and some 
horses were not found for a week. We kept about 
one hundred in line and the rest went every way, 
and to see that outfit, yelling and screaming, going 
at full speed over that ranch, every man whirling 
a rattle that sounded like the quintessence of bot- 
tled thunder, or electric shocks, was a caution. It 
simply set the geese crazy. 

"They went up into the air in bunches like big 
puffs of smoke. I saw an explosion once on a Mis- 
sissippi river steamer at New Orleans, and for a few 
moments the air was filled with pieces of cotton. 
This looked just like it. It was fun for those who 
kept in the saddle, and we succeeded in routing the 
geese. But it was only for a few hours; they were 
back again the next day or night. So I divided up the 
force. Each man had a detail and a line of march, 
and his duty was to ride up and down firing off a 
shotgun and whirling a watchman's rattle. The 



minute this stopped, however, down out of some- 
where would come a thousand or two geese, and after 
two weeks of this we began to suspect they were 
growing fond of the rattle; and by jingo they cer- 
tainly were! One of the most successful things we 
tried was to fasten to twenty geese big pieces of 
red cloth. That scared them into fits. The tied-up 
geese would of course follow the rest, and the rest 
were badly frightened. That worked for a while until 
they got used to it; that was the trouble, they al- 
ways got used to it. 

"We dyed a hundred geese red, a hundred blue, 
some with red necks and blue wings. Why, we had 
the ornithologists crazy about new species. One old 
goose flew around for weeks with a boy's coat and 
trousers on, but it didn't work in the long run, and 
despite all our efforts, when the salaries of the 
goosemen were charged up, the ammunition, the 
food of the goose horses, and all the wear and tear 
of a goose company, you can bet that fifty per cent 
of the profits had gone whooping with the honkers. 
Some queer things happened at times. One night 
a new man was out with me. We were crouching 
by the edge of a creek expecting the geese, and 
hearing the honking everywhere, when along came 
a big heron, and taking the boy for a stump alighted 
on his head. The boy grabbed him and caught the 
bird. Being a giant, the heron began to beat him 
with his wings and peck at him with his beak, and 
before I could reach him they rolled into the water, 
the boy yelling that his goose was trying to kill him. 
When he struck the water he let go and the heron 
flew off, and the boy threw up the job next day. You 
couldn't make him think that geese were harmless 
after that. 

"The goose question only found settlement in the 
natural settling up of the country. The people drove 
them off, then killed them to eat and slowly San 
Francisco grew and became able to consume geese, 
and that was the logical end of the great goose war. 
But it took years, and within fifteen years I have 
seen miles of Tulare and San Joaquin counties cov- 
ered with snow-white geese. To-day they are so 
reduced that it is almost necessary to protect them 
to get any decent shooting, and geese are rare in 
Southern California." 

The duck season in California opened October 1. 
The entire State is divided into duck clubs, and the 
man who isn't in a duck club isn't in it. This looks 
hard, but it is the salvation of the ducks: if not 
so the market hunter, and the pot hunter would 
wipe them out in a few years. Nearly all the ducks 
found on the Atlantic Coast are taken here, but the 
days of the great swarms of geese are gone and 
the gooseman is out of a job. 

o 

A GREAT EMU DRIVE. 



We have given, at times, accounts of exciting 
rabbit drives at different points in this State and on 
the Coast, where the participants would turn out by 
hundreds and meet at the appointed time and place 
for the purpose of depleting the jack-rabbits that had 
become a destructive pest. The jacks in some of 
these drives have been killed in thousands. 

In Australia rabbits were at one time, in certain 
districts, so destructive to vegetation that their con- 
tinued presence meant bankruptcy to stock raisers 
and farmers. All sorts of expedients were tried for 
relief, drives, poison, fires, etc., but not until vast 
sections of the rabbit country were fenced off with 
rabbit-proof wire fences was this serious problem 
solved. Some land owners wire fenced their holdings 
and in getting rid of the imprisoned rodents de- 
stroyed only the females — the bucks afterwards 
gradually killed each other, for they have a way of 
fighting among themselves viciously. 

But, however, this is a story of a drive, but not 
a rabbit drive. The emu, it seems, is in a way, a 
pest in some parts of Australia for the reason that 
they are the means of spreading the prickly pear. 
They feed upon the fruit and drop the seeds far 
and wide. The prickly pear grows quickly and covers 
valuable grazing ground. In consequence the birds 
are not encouraged in some districts and the drive 
is resorted to to get rid of them. 

The following account of the great emu drive at 
Callandoon, Goondiwindi, on the Queensland border, 
Australia, recently appeared in the Sydney Argus: 

There was movement on the station a few days 
ago at Callandoon, when an exciting event took place 
in the shape of a second emu drive, caused by the 
desire to exterminate the birds on account of the 
damage done by them. 

Like those well known words of "Banjo" Pater- 
son's, "All the tried and noted riders from the sta- 
tions far and near had mustered to the homestead," 
where the various riders criticised mounts, exchanged 
greetings, and a considerable amount of good-natured 
chaff. 

A glorious morning, scarcely a cloud in the sky, 
and a balmy fragrance made the riders eager for the 
fray, and the horses champ their bits, so, after girths 
had been tightened and lengths adjusted, off we went. 

Our road led out to the camp of the emu men, 
now well known as Emu Jack and Colin Campbell, 
where we were to assemble, inspect the yard, and 
receive our places and instructions. 



The country was green, and freshened by recent 
rains, the going was heavy. But as we brushed 
through scented sandalwood scrub and rode beneath 
the dew-sparkling boxwoods on the plain, we felt 
that gaite de coeur only caused by the feel of a good 
mount, and so the time passed till we neared the 
Coomoran sliprails, where we received a hearty wel- 
come from our hosts. 

Lunch was next the order of the day, and, when 
that repast was finished, and horses watered at a 
beautiful sheet of water, we rode to the yard which 
was strongly constructed of stout posts about seven 
feet high, and with two widths of netting securely 
fixed on four wires, tightly strained; it was circular, 
about two chains by one chain, and in one corner 
of the paddock towards which the wily "Jack" knew 
the birds ran when disturbed. On one side a wire 
fence ran round the paddock corner, while from the 
other side a wing of hessian was stretched out 
through the timber for about a mile, and of this the 
birds were extremely frightened. 

All was now ready, so with our leaders we set off 
to place in various positions our party, which con- 
sisted of between thirty and forty horsemen. The 
plan of campaign was to post riders out from the 
wing through the paddock, then sweep the birds 
round from the timber into the plain between the 
wing and the wire fence, with the flying brigade 
behind and towards the yards. 

The culling out was heavy, and the front riders 
who had received careful orders, were not to make 
too much noise till required. Then the best mounted 
set off with "Emu Jack" towards the end of the pad- 
dock, which was several miles long. 

Away in the distance a faint noise is heard, and 
now we know the chase is started in earnest. 

Here they come spreading from the light timber 
on the plain, and drawing towards the yard, and 
behind the crack of whips and the shouting proclaim 
everyone to stand to his post. 

"Close in!" "Lookout!" "Emus for miles!" Now 
a wonderful panorama — a sight of a lifetime — pre- 
sents itself and here they come in earnest, with the 
horsemen thundering behind, the frightened wallabies 
and startled kangaroos scuttling from our road, while 
the cockatoos chattering fly screaming away towards 
the heavy timber. 

Gradually the horsemen close in. Whips are ring- 
ing, shouts echo and echo again as a few emus break 
away. Now they are nearing the wing, and a glorious 
gallop rings Lindsay Gordon's grand words — "Hard 
behind them in the timber. Harder still across the 
heath. Close behind them through the ti-tree scrub 
we dashed" — through my brain, as with pulses beat- 
ing, all the horsemen in mad excitement thunder on. 

Once in the timber the birds, now greatly fright- 
ened, rush towards the yard and amidst a perfect 
pandemonium the riders close in, when a few break 
away through the wire fence into the next paddock. 

"Keep back! Keep back!" yells Emu Jack. 

"Hold hard there; give them time!" Crash! bang! 
over the fallen tree trunks, nearer the terrified birds. 
"Come on!" "Come on!" "Now we have them!" 
"Look out there!" "Get back, Harry!" Hey whoop, 
until at last they're in the yard, where some of the 
more active horsemen fling themselves at the gate- 
way, and draw up the netting gate. 

What a sight! Round and round the yard, and into 
the netting dash the birds in their vain endeavors to 
once more gain their freedom. But, alas! 'tis their 
end. 

Great old cockbirds with colored wattles, and great 
strength of limb, crash over the younger birds, 
trampling them down, and at several places the yard 
is strained to its utmost till it almost bursts, while 
all round it we are posted, and with stout bluegum 
waddies slash the birds on the head, which is their 
most vulnerable spot, from off the netting, and so 
relieve the tension. 

Some of the more exhausted now fall, and over 
them surge a sea of riving emus, with a stray mar- 
supial or two, feathers are flying and hoarse cries 
resounding through the air. 

"Volunteers in the yard?" The more reckless 
clamber in and wage mortal combat with the un- 
fortunate emus. Strength and science here tell, as 
only on the head kills, so while older men, who have 
married, "and aren't as young as we were, you know," 
hang over the yard with bludgeons, the bolder dare 
the now infuriated birds, and with telling blows 
gradually thin out the yard, till only a few are left 
kicking and struggling in their death agonies. 

And how they can kick! Some of the dare devils 
who faced the birds will carry to their graves the 
bruises and gashes they have received from the 
powerful legs and spurs of the birds of the plains. 

A count is next decided on, and after some con- 
siderable time we know that 490 emus have met 
their doom, and will spread the cursed prickly pear 
no more. 

After a rest and some refreshment we once more 
wend our way to the homestead, all now elated and 
in high spirits, and several who fancy their mounts 
dash off in a friendly flutter, while those on the 
slower horses curse their luck and hope for better 
blood next time. 

Callandoon to the fore! Lanimermore wins! 
Elected! By Jove! Mi Mi in front! Here comes 
the gray! So tempus fugit till we reach the last 
gate. 

Once more we part company and say good bye and 
good luck, but few, if any, will ever forgr-l the 
exciting ride and the memorable "drive," said to be 
the most successful ever taken part in Queensland, 
and probably in Australia. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909. J 



TUB BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



S 



ECHOES FROM THE BIG NORTHWEST. 



(By August Wolf.) 

Thousands of caribou, which traveled southward 
across the Forty-mile and Sixty-mile toward White 
River in the northland last winter, are reported to 
be trekking northward by George Black, councillor, 
who has just returned from a hunting trip, on the 
Sixty-mile in company with Charles Paddock. He 
said he never imagined that the magnitude of the 
herd could be anything near the one which must have 
crossed the Sixty-mile, where the tracks were thick 
and covered a width of ten miles. They bagged one 
of the stragglers, the herd having passed several 
days before. Mr. Black said of his trip: 

"We were up the Stewart looking for moose and 
ducks, and crossed 10 miles south from the Stewart 
to a chain of lakes on which the Hudson's Bay Com- 
pany had its old post. It was on a lake seven miles 
long, four wide, and with a fine gravelly bottom. This 
post was on the old trail between Selkirk and the 
head of the Stewart. It seems that the company 
in early days, traveled more by overland trails than 
the streams. I am told that the post on the lakes 
was destroyed by the Indians about the time the Sel- 
kirk post was burned. Phil Kelly, Turner Town- 
send and Norton Townsend accompanied us up on 
the trip in the Stewart country. We found the 
lakes frozen too much for ducks, with the exception 
of fish or sea ducks. We got a lot of them and 
cooked them in a pot, and could not tell at meal 
time whether we had mackerel or cod. It was 
all right for the Novia Scotians of the party. A 
little snow was on the ground, and made a brittle 
sound which could be heard a mile. So there was 
little chance of getting a moose." 



Timber cruisers returning from the headwaters of 
Independence creek in the Pend'Oreille district, north- 
east of Spokane, report sighting a band of elk in 
the northern part of Idaho. Few elk are known to 
be left in that part of the state and the report of 
the band in that region has excited considerable com- 
ment. The grounds inhabited by the elk are reported 
to be almost inaccessible at any time of the year and 
for this reason the animals have been undisturbed for 
many seasons and have increased. Independence 
creek is the headwaters of the North Fork River 
and can soon be reached by the Idaho Northern Rail- 
road, now being built up the banks of that stream. 
When this is finished by packing several hard port- 
ages the feeding ground of the elk can be reached. 
Deer are also plentiful in the St. Joe country, having 
been driven down from the higher mountains by 
heavy snows. Black tail deer are in evidence in 
various parts of the district. 



The law which gives the hunter the right to kill 
one elk during the season in Oregon has all the ap- 
pearance of a farce in the Sumpter district. On 
Crawfish Creek, a tributary of the North Fork of the 
John Day River, a band of noble animals has for 
some time made its headquarters, and from a man 
who has been looking up the mining situation there 
it is learned that fully 50 hunters had invaded that 
country with the view of capturing one of the elk 
for each man. There are not more than 25 animals 
in the herd and if one out of each two men captured 
an elk there would not be one left in the territory. 
The law does not protect in this manner at all, but 
provides a way for the extermination of every elk 
in the state. 



Eighty riders and 200 men on foot participated in 
the coyote and rabbit drives at Wenatchie, Wash., 
November 9, and at Sunnyside, W r ash., November 26. In 
the first round-up the territory was too wide to keep 
the coyotes in the lead and as a result many es- 
caped with pelts on their backs by hiding in crevices 
or back circling. Fifty animals were slain, however, 
and scores of rabbits were brought to town. There 
was a coyote banquet in the evening at which the 
Elks entertained the hunters. Two hundred and fifty 
jack rabbits were killed at Sunnyside. An aged In- 
dian living near Toppenish made a special trip of 
30 miles to gather up the fruit ot the sport to re- 
plenish his larder. 



Washington Game and Fish Protective Society will 
introduce before the Legislature in January a bill 
providing for a complete revision of the game laws. 
Incorporated in the bill will be a code of game laws 
to replace the present statutes with provisions for 
the preservation of game both by the lowering of the 
limit of taking and by the shortening of the season 
for certain game. The Washington society, of which 
Frank Pontin is president and Henry Rief, game 
warden of King County, secretary, is preparing a 
code. Upon completion it will be published and dis- 
tributed among sportsmen in general and will un- 
doubtedly be approved by the state convention of 
the county game and fish protective societies. Pres- 
ident Pontin says that the multiplying population 
makes this economical legislation necessary to pre- 
serve game and fish. 



Katherine Hibbs, 15-year-old daughter of R. B. 
Hibbs, a rancher on the north fork of the Clearwater 
river, 25 miles north above Oroflno, Idaho, south- 
east of Spokane, killed two bears this season. While 
out with her younger sister, her dog treed a large 
brown bear. Katherine sent her sister to the cabin 
to get a rifle, while she stayed with the dog to 
watch bruin, who sat suspiciously high in a tall pine 
tree. When the girls returned with the rifle Kath- 
erine aimed at the bear and it came tumbling out of 
the tree, at the second crack of the rifle, with a 
bullet through its heart. Miss Hibbs is at home in 



the timber and she spends much of her time riding 
on her saddle horse through the lonesome trails in the 
forest. 



Sportsmen in Central Idaho report good quail shoot- 
ing in the Lewiston district. The season opened 
November 1. There was some shooting out of season, 
but the offenders were punished. The limit of 18 
with the season restrictions is sufficient to protect 
the quails and it is believed that it will be difficult 
to hunt them out this year. The fact that the coun- 
try is rough and brushy is considered a sufficient 
protection for the birds. 

M. H. Harbaugh, Deputy State Game Warden of 
Idaho, confiscated 500 pounds of fish and several gill 
nets and arrested two men near Sandpoint, Idaho, a 
few days ago. The men, who gave their names as 
Samuel Harvey and James Corey, were operating 
at a point where Pack River empties into Lake Pend 
'Oreille, whence they had already removed 200 
pounds of fish. Harbaugh forced the men to surren- 
der at the point of a rifle. John Dooley, justice of 
the peace at Hope, Idaho, assisted in taking the pris- 
oners and paraphernalia to Sandpoint. The game 
warden charges the men with setting a net across 
the mouth of the river, thus capturing fish running 
up the stream to spawn. The pair pleaded not guilty 
and were held for trail. The statutes of Idaho pro- 
vide a heavy fine and jail sentence for capturing 
fish illegally. Mr. Harbaugh has issued an order 
forbidding the purchase of fish from lake fishermen, 
the purpose being to stop the use of seines and nets 
by poachers. 



John S. Riseland, State Fish Commissioner, an- 
nounces that the seventeen salmon hatcheries operat- 
ing in Washington will turn out about 80,000,000 fry 
this year. Three new hatcheries were put into 
commission this month, and the state is also operat- 
ing two trout hatcheries. Spawn taking on the Col- 
umbia River is over and is well under way at the 
Puget Sound hatcheries. The streams tributary to 
the Sound have been too low to permit the fish to 
get to the spawning grounds as early in the year 
as usual. The rains have remedied this difficulty and 
if high water does not prevail the contemplated out- 
put will be realized. 



With a small fortune in the shape of a fox pelt 
flung across his back, Frederick Algernon Montgom- 
ery, one of the most successful trappers of the 
northland, walked into Strathcona, B. C, a few days 
ago after an absence of three months in the varmint 
belt, are advices contained in a letter from Strath- 
cona, to sportsmen in Spokane. The pelt is that of 
a black fox, worth from $900 to $1,500. On an 
average only five black skins are brought down 
from the northland each year, although thousands of 
men make a living at trapping the furry creatures 
and more than 100,000 foxes are captured in Canada 
alone each season. 

The pelt of the black fox is highly prized by the 
aristocracy, Russian autocrats being especially eager 
to secure all available specimens. There is an ever 
open market for this pelt in Russia, the supply be- 
ins infinitely smaller than the demand. Within 
the last twenty years a number of men of long experi- 
ence in the trapping business have attempted to in- 
crease the breed oi black foxes by capturing young 
ones alive and turning them out in large enclosures 
to breed, but beyond the expenditure of large sums 
of money, nothing tangible ever resulted. Nature 
guards as closely as ever the reason for the existence 
of black, red and grey foxes in one family. 

o 

THE CALL OF THE AFRICAN WILD. 



From the following press dispatch it would seem 
that the big game retreats in the African continent 
have not all been exploited by the white man. If 
this report is credible there is awaiting some grand 
sport for those connected with the proposed expe- 
dition : 

"A mysterious hidden destination, and the leader- 
ship of a famous personality, are the two character- 
istics that lend an unusual interest to the big-game 
shooting and exploring expedition now in process 
of formation in London, which will depart for Cen- 
tral Africa about the middle of next month. Colonel 
J. W. Colenbrander, C. B., is organizing, and will 
have sole charge of the party, and bis name is one 
that recalls many stirring memories. 

He it was who raised and commanded that hard- 
bitten thousand known as Kitchener's Fighting 
Scouts — one of the few columns in the late Boer war 
that never once had occasion to "regret to report." 
As a special privilege they reported direct to Lord 
Kitchener, who is said to have shown them a grim 
partiality by giving them all the most difficult jobs; 
and regrets were things they also left to the Boer com- 
manders, by whom they are not regarded with affec- 
tion to this day and gave the kilties some good drub- 
bings at different times. 

"I am going into Central Africa and adjacent re- 
gions for two years," he explained to an interviewer, 
"but the members of my party — strictly limited as 
to numbers and personnel — will have the option of 
coming out at any time. We are going into abso- 
lutely unexplored and practically unknown areas, 
never yet penetrated by a white man, and I do not 
wish to indicate them too closely, for others might 
want to trek that way, spoiling the game preserves 
for us, absorbing some of our sources of transport — ■ 
always a difficulty in Africa — and possibly, If In- 
experienced, causing trouble with the natives. 

I know about these areas from native reports I 
have been collecting for the last year, and I can al- 
ways talk to a native direct and weigh his evidence. 



You would be surprised at the vast distance covered 
by some native travelers and hunters. It is only in 
maps, filled in from unreliable native hearsay, that 
no undiscovered country appears to remain. 

It is virgin game country where we are going. The 
natives near the locality don't go into it for fear of 
meeting possible Arab or Marai hunters, who from 
time to time have skirmished on its outskirts, and 
who, in turn, will not go in for fear of the local peo- 
ple. This reciprocal fear has served to keep the re- 
gion isolated. Elephants swarm there in thousands, 
and you can practically walk through them, as no- 
body has ever shot there. Chiefs on the outskirts 
of these districts say the game are as tame as herded 
goats, for they have never heard a shot fired." 

"The game is the great attraction, but not the only 
attraction," the Colonel smilingly admitted, in an- 
swer to a query. "We want the ivory, and we shall 
certainly explore for other things. The ivory is a 
foregone conclusion, as witness the recent reports 
from the Lado Enclave, and the difficulty of its trans- 
port has already been overcome." 

Colonel Colenbrander pioneered that historic hunt- 
ing expedition into Matebeleland in 188, which, in 
its results, eventually brought about the annexation 
of the whole country with all its actual and potential 
wealth; and that though suggests the possibility that 
this present sporting venture to the unknown may 
also not be lacking, as time goes on, in highly inter- 
esting and important developments. 

o ■ 

GOOD THEN AND GOOD NOW. 



In looking over some of the old records of the Du 
Pont De Nemours Powder Company recently, Mr. 
Alexis I. Du Pont came across an old clipping from 
the "New England Galaxy," published at Boston, 
and dated May 2nd, 1823. This relic of nearly a cen- 
tury ago is a matter of more than passing interest 
to lovers of the gun and is given here in its entirety. 
In will be further interesting as an illustration of 
times and affairs in the long ago that while the com- 
munication is dated March 21st, 1823, the issue in 
which it appeared bears date nearly six weeks 
later: 

LADY JOHNSON'S ENGLISH POWDER. 
Is well known by most of our sportsmen, and by 
many officers of the army and navy, and of the corps 
of Engineers, Ordnance Department, etc. A com- 
parison of it with 

DUPONT'S AMERICAN POWDER, 
must therefore be extremely interesting to the citi- 
zens of the United States. 

The Brandywine Eprouvette is a perfectly accurate 
test of the actual strength of Powder; because its 
graduations are made by a weight, and rest on 
ground mathematically accurate. Of this any one 
will be convinced who will take the trouble to call 
at No. 69 Broad St., where experiments will be 
made on the Eprouvette, and its principles explained, 
at any time, to any person who feels desirous of be- 
coming master of the subject. 

The Brandywine Eprouvette carries conviction of 
the quality of the Powder to four of our senses, viz: 
the touch, the sight, the hearing and the smell. 

By the Brandywine Eprouvette, the strength of 
the Lady Johnson's is found to be on an average 25 
degrees, while some of Dupont's, made in 1812, and 
tried in 1821, gave 26 degrees. 
Dupont's FR goes 33 degrees. 
Dupont's Fg goes 30 degrees. 
Dupont's FFR goes 40 degrees. 
Dupont's FFg goes 36 degrees. 
Dupont FFFR goes 50 degrees. 
Dupont's FFFg goes 46 degrees. 
And yet the Lady Johnson's Powder sells by whole- 
sale at 50 & 55 cents per lb. (because it is English) — 
whilst I sell Dupont's, (it being American) at 26 
cents, and by retail the Lady Johnson's brings 66 
cents, while I sell Dupont's at 37%. 

E. COPELAND, Jr., No. 69 Broad Street. 
Every Editor in the U. S. friendly to DOMESTIC 
INDUSTRY, is respectfully requested to notice the 
facts here stated, if he deems them of sufficient 
national importance. 
March 21, 1823. 

o 

Oil Bedraggled Ducks Slaughtered. — The oil nui- 
sance is not confined to San Francisco and tributary 
bay waters by any means. A report last week from 
Redondo Beach, Los Angeles county, gives the fol- 
lowing account of the slaughter of mallard ducks 
by the southern beach combers. Our Oriental friends, 
as usual, got their share of the windfall, as they in- 
variably do whenever the opportunity offers to get 
game or fish In any other than a sportsman's way: 

"Duck hunting under peculiar conditions is afford- 
ing sport for the residents along the beach between 
here and Manhattan. Thousands of mallards have 
been driven south by the cold weather In the north 
and the coast. Is lined with them. Unfortunately 
for the ducks, there is a large amount of heavy crude 
oil on the surface of the water, and when they come 
in contact with It their feathers become matted, 
making it impossible for them to fly. 

Thus handicapped, they seek relief on the sand and 
become so burdened down they are scarcely able to 
walk. The duck killer, armed with a stick, finds 
little trouble In bagging the limit on a moonlight 
night or during the early hours of the morning. A 
small army of Japs was gathering them In this 
morning (the 19th Inst.) and shipping them to mar- 
ket." 

o 

Entries for the Boston show close on February 3. 
The show dates are: February 22, 23, 24 and 25. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



WHAT BLOODHOUNDS CAN DO. 



(By A. Croxton Smith, Hon. Sec. of the Association 
of Bloodhound Breeders, England.) 

Given fair conditions, a bloodhound, when properly 
trained, can do wonderful things in the way of man- 
tracking. Many dogs will hunt their masters for 
considerable distances, but it is doubtful if any other 
variety has anything like the fine scenting proper- 
ties of the bloodhound. So much attention has been 
bestowed upon breeding the foxhound for pace, that 
his nose is nothing like as good as it used to be, 
and it is a constant complaint that a pack will leave 
the line of a hunted fox to follow that of a fresh one. 
Now, a bloodhound is of no use that will change in 
this way. If he is any good at all, he will stick 
to the original line, no matter how many times it 
may have been crossed by others. It is this immu- 
nity from a tendency to change that makes his work 
so highly appreciated. 

Apart from that, he has the power of hunting 
a cold line that belongs to no other breed. In the 
United States there is a well-authenticated case of 
bloodhounds being put on the track of a man thirty 
hours after he had murdered a woman. Detectives 
guarded the locality, and when the hounds arrived 
they hunted about four miles to the door of a house 
in which a young negro was found whose boots cor- 
responded with footprints near the corpse. It is 
generally understood that a negro leaves a stronger 
scent than a white man, and this naturally has its 
advantages in such a case. 

Twenty years ago, when "Jack the Ripper" was 
horrifying the country with his iniquities, in response 
to a popular outcry Mr. Edwin Brough brought some 
of his hounds to London and placed them at the 
service of the police. It is betraying no secret to 
say that Mr. Brough, who knows more about blood- 
bounds than any living person, was not very hopeful 
of any good purpose being served, but there was a 
chance that if a murder were discovered in the early 
hours of the morning something might be done. As it 
happened, the murderer was too astute to take any 
risks. For the two months the hounds were in town 
we had an immunity from sensations, but directly 
they were taken away the ghoul commenced opera 
tions again. 

Let me say at once that the probability of a blood- 
hound being able to trace a criminal in a large town 
is very remote. Everything would be against him. 
It stands to reason that the scent of any particular 
individual would quickly be obliterated. 

Bloodhounds are in constant use in America. Here 
they would not be able to work under such advan- 
tages as are afforded by large tracts of virgin coun- 
try untrodden by the feet of men. Even in our 
thickly populated country, however, there are innu- 
merable instances in which they would be of definite 
value. Take the cases of little children who have 
gone astray on the Welsh hills. If a bloodhound 
had been available and could have been at once 
started on the track of these little ones there would 
have been fewer sorrowing parents. A good deal 
of trouble would be saved if a hound or two were 
attached to such convict •stablishments as Dart- 
moor, where prisoners escape with tolerable fre- 
quency. Pitted against the sagacity of a bloodhound 
on the lonely moor, a prisoner's dash for liberty would 
be unavailing. He would not be at large for more 
than an hour or two at the outside; it would be 
practically impossible for him to baffle his relent- 
less pursuer. 

Would the perpetrator of the cattle outrages in 
the Midlands have escaped detection if the police 
had had the services of a bloodhound? I doubt it. 
Many a murder mystery in outlying country places 
would be unravelled, and a country-house burglary 
would furnish an ideal opportunity unless the clever 
craftsman had a motor-car at command. 

[We might mention here, the Tortorici case that 
occurred in San Francisco several years ago. The 
murdered victim's dismembered body was left on the 
sidewalk by the murderer, and notwithstanding the 
fact that several thousand people had congregated 
at the scene of the gruesome discovery, a brace of 
half-bred bloodhounds owned by Fred Schmitz of the 
Point Reyes Sportsmen's Club, followed a trail many 
hours old and led the police to within a short dis- 
tance of the murderer's domicile. The dogs were 
hampered by the big crowd of morbidly curious 
spectators, but practically were the means of locating 
the commission of the crime and the identity of the 
participants.] 

The question is whether in our usual haphazard 
manner, we shall continue to rely upon voluntary 
agencies or whether the matter shall be taken in 
hand by the county authorities. It is quite possi- 
ble that the police may not care to add to their 
many duties that of keeping and training a blood- 
hound or two, but it should be an easy thing for a 
small annual fee to induce sport-loving people to 
add a bloodhound to their menage. Of course, the 
hound would have to be well trained, but this would 
not present insuperable difficulties. Almost every 
puppy enters naturally to man-hunting. Occasionally 
we shall find a young hound that has no aptitude for 
the work, but it is not very usual. Early lessions are 
simple. As soon as the whelp has sense enough 
to be handy he should be encouraged to hunt someone 
he knows. Let him see the runner start, and then 
stimulate him to find, rewarding him with a piece 
of meat when successful. He will quickly enter into 
the game. When he has attained a certain amount 
of proficiency, set him to work on strangers, gradu- 
ally increasing the lead given to the quarry, until he 
will hunt a line some hours cold. The colder the 



line the dog can work the more useful will the 
hound be. 

It is advisable to habituate him to hunting the 
clean boot from the outset; that is to say, a man 
whose boots have not been doctored by any artificial 
preparation. No stronger scent than the emanations 
from the human body is needed; if the puppy is 
started on aniseed you are only teaching him a lesson 
which he will have to unlearn. As time goes on it is 
well to cross the line of the runner in several places, 
which may be indicated by means of sticks. Should 
the youngster show any disposition to change he 
must be at once checked and helped to keep on the 
original trail. I may remark, in parenthesis, that it 
is unnecessary to let the hound smell any article of 
clothing belonging to the hunted man, so long as 
you know whence the man has started. Once the 
right line is hit upon the hound will stick to it. 

Naturally this requires a certain amount of patience 
on the part of the teacher, but the readiness of the 
pupil and the interest in the work make the task a 
pleasant one. I cannot, however, too strongly empha- 
sise the necessity of bringing the hound to such 
a state of perfection that he will follow a line laid 
at least twelve hours before he is put upon it. 
Anything less than this would materially reduce his 
value in the detection of crime. For most practi- 
cal purposes six hours might suffice if an organiza- 
tion were once sufficiently established to ensure 
the presence of bloodhounds in every county. As 
matters stand at present there is no guarantee that 
one can be borrowed even on the day the crime is 
discovered, and much valuable time is lost in debat- 
ing as to whether or not a hound shall be tried. It 
is quite hopeless to arrive at such a conclusion twen- 
ty-four hours after the event. I have been asked 
to send a hound to Scotland, in order to trace the 
whereabouts of a child who had been missing for 
three or four days, and I had some trouble in convinc- 
ing my correspondent that he was seeking to accom- 
plish the impossible. 

As much misconception exists as to the temper of 
these noble and dignified hounds, it may be well to 
mention that the pursued man would run no danger 
of being worried when caught. His captor would sim- 
ply satisfy himself that he was the quarry he was 
seeking, and there would be an end of his quest. 

o 

CLOSE SEASON FOR WASHINGTON GAME BIRDS. 



Mayor C. Herbert Moore, of Spokane, Washington, 
is the author of a memorial adopted by the Spo- 
kane Chamber of Commerce for presentation to the 
Legislature proposing a closed season for quail and 
prairie chickens for Eastern Washington for two 
years. His remarks on the subject at a recent gath- 
ering of the Chamber were greeted with applause 
and enthusiastic action by a formal vote. He said: 

"On a trip up the Spokane Valley last fall, I was 
astonished at the prevalence of grasshoppers, and 
the havoc they had wrought on the fruit and grain 
of that fertile district. I learned that the conditions 
generally were worse than they had ever been. 

You remember we have had a close season on quail 
for several years, and last fall opened the season to 
hunters for the first time. Now, isn't it reasonable 
to attribute the unprecedented prevalence of grass- 
hoppers to the first open season on quail? The grass- 
hoppers and other insects are the natural food of 
the grouse family, and if you kill off the quail, the 
net result is more grasshoppers and insect pests. 

It is pleasant to take the attitude of preserving 
our native game birds. The quail is a cheerful bird 
to hear, a companionable little creature, and is al- 
most as tame as an ordinary chicken. Until this fall 
the little fellows used to come chirping and pecking 
for food into my back dooryard on Eighth avenue 
every fall. But one season's shooting has thinned 
them out terribly. They used to nest on the hill- 
side just back of me, but now they are gone. 

Years ago the hills around the edge of Spokane 
used to abound in prairie chicken. They are hard to 
find now, and it is shameful to kill them when they 
are so scarce and so small. 

I have always thought that the state should take 
up the propagation of our native game birds the 
same as they do of fish. It is a matter of record that 
wherever propagation stations are established over 
the game territory and where the game is closely 
protected, it is bound to flourish. I do not believe 
our legislators realize the grave danger of game bird 
extermination that is squaHely^ upon us. A couple 
of years' closed season now-^^efmi 1 If kink it would be 
advisable to close for five "y^rs— would give the 
game time to reproduce and t8uf?ftfly. It will be a 
much cheaper and easier task to save the game in 
this manner than to restock the country four or five 
years hence after the game hogs have practically 
stripped it. 

The Rod and Gun Club's idea of shortening the 
season to one month will help, but it won't help 
enough. That will be all right after the stock has 
been replenished, but the stock of birds here is too 
low now. If the Legislature votes to close the sea- 
son for all game birds for two years and then will 
open it only for one month for a year or two after 
that, I believe it will be the salvation of the game, 
will make the Eastern Washington grain fields the 
home of thousands of the farmers' little friends and 
will rid the farms of the destructive insect pests." 

o 

Market Hunters. — Much complaint is being made in 
Glenn and Colusa counties against the alleged prac- 
tice of market hunters, sometimes termed "bull" 
hunters, in the use of big guns in the slaughter of 
ducks. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



Game Laws Problem — Assemblyman Fleisher of 
Santa Maria is one of those who like to lie adjacent 
to the sad sea waves along the Santa Barbara channel 
and listen to the barking of the seals and sea lions. 
He has presented a bill for the protection of those 
denizens of the deep, declaring against the shooting 
or trapping of the animals except for scientific or 
exhibition purposes. While he was unable to deter- 
mine whether a seal was a fish or something else. 
Speaker Stanton referred the bill to the Committee 
on Fish and Game, which is to have the usual hard 
tussle this session with the fish and game problem. 
Weeks were spent two years ago in devising new 
laws and amending the old ones, and now the whole 
thing must be gone over again, it seems, because of 
the varying conditions that exist in different parts of 
this big State. 

Aside from the questions of fish and game, some 
of the song birds are again threatened, foremost 
among them being the meadow lark. The Audubon 
Society will have a hard fight to save the bird this 
year, for Assemblyman Stuckenbruck, a new member 
from San Joaquin county, is out with his gun, de- 
claring the larks create havoc with the grape crops. 
He will fire several barrels during the session. 

Some of the sportsmen of the Legislature are at 
work now on a petition for dividing the State into 
three game districts, to fit the varying conditions as 
to deer, quail and other game. It may be that one 
district will embrace the high mountain sections of 
the north, another take in the region around San 
Francisco bay and the San Joaquin and Sacramento 
valleys, and the third all territory south of Santa 
Barbara. 

Assemblman Preston favors a "coyote scalp" 
bounty act, and will introduce a measure calling 
on the Fish Commission to pay these claims. His 
bill will provide that a sum not less than $50,000 nor 
more than $100,000 shall be paid out of the hunting 
license receipts for scalps of coyotes, mountain lions 
and other wild animals that prey on fur and feathered 
game. 

"I do not favor a county receiving a percentage 
of the receipts," he is quoted, "because San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles and one or two other counties 
will receive the largest part of this sum. By the 
terms of my bill the counties needing the protection 
will receive it." 

Assemblyman Polsley has introduced a bill which 
has crept in unheralded among the general cargo of 
proposed fish and game bills which will repeal the 
present hunters' license law. This bill, No. 433. pro- 
vides for the repeal of an act approved March 13, 
1907, which regulates the limit of game birds and 
animals, and provides for licenses. 

More than two score bills have been introduced 
in the Assembly this session further complicating the 
fish and game laws. Polsley has acted upon the sug- 
gestion of his constituents, who are opposed to the 
present regulations. This is the only bill introduced 
which gives the hunters unlimited license in pursu- 
ing sport. 

The Sanford bill introduced in the upper house on 
the 19th inst, will, if passed, make the deer limit, 
three bucks to one individual during each season, in- 
stead of two as at present. 

While there has been a number of bills introduced 
advocating necessary and proper changes or amend- 
ments, some pernicious measures have cropped up 
that need the most zealous and persistent watching 
by sportsmen and the advocates of fish and game 
protection for the general good. 



Steelhead Angling. — Steelhead trout are still nu- 
merous in Monterey bay, particularly so near the 
mouth of the Carmel river. The largest fish taken 
to date was landed one day last week by Captain 
Noyes, steward of the Monterey Boat Club. It was 
35 inches long and weighed over 12 pounds. 



Floods Kill Salt Water Fish. — One result of the re- 
cent up-river floods and the admixture of the im- 
mense bodies of fresh water with the salt bay waters 
has been noticed in the presence of large quantities 
of dead rockflsh along the Marin shores. These fish 
are deep water denizens, but notwithstanding there 
has been enough fresh water to kill large quantities 
of these fish. 



Grey Squirrels in England. — It is reported that the 
result of releasing American grey squirrels in Re- 
gent's Park, London, is that they have increased 
quite unexpectedly, being found now out in the coun- 
try as far away as North Middlesex. They are un- 
doubtedly increasing in numbers, and further, where 
the grey squirrel bobs up serenely the native red 
squirrel disappears. This state of affairs is regret- 
ted by observers who advance the wish that the intro- 
duction of the pretty grey creatures will not prove 
a nuisance. 



Girl Rifle Shots. — Two girl pupils of the Curtis 
High School, New York City, qualified recently in 
sub-target tests as markswomen, and it is likely they 
will shortly advance to the sharpshooter class. Helen 
Crandall made 47 out of a possible 50, scoring seven 
bulls-eyes. Margaret Croes scored 45. 

This school is the only one in New York so far 
where rifle shooting has been taken up with en- 
thusiasm by girl students, quite a number prac- 
tice on the sub-target rifle range every week. It 
is likely that in a short time a number of the girls 
will qualify as sharpshooters. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



SENSATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



Dispersal Sale of Nutwood Stock Farm 



Will he held on the opening day of the 

Second Annual Pleasanton Sale 



i ESTATE OF MARTIN CARTES, Esq. 

March 25, 26, 27, 1909. 



Kvery horse on the farm 

—60 head in all— 

is consigned to this side. 



NUTWOOD STOCK FARM CONSIGNMENT. 

NUTWOOD WILKES 2:16! 



Greatest sire of extreme speed in California. 



Lord Alwin 



Own hrother to the Great John A. MeKerron 2:04^ and sire of Ella M. R. 2:1(5%, 
fastest Pacific Coast two-year-old trotter of 1908. 

7 Grandly bred Yearlings 



5 
6 
2 



<« 



<« 



Two-Year-Olds 
Three-Year-Olds 
Four- Year-Olds 



OTHER CONSIGNMENTS. 



MR. CEO. A. POUNDER w ill send 



2-year-old trotter 



27 BROOD MARES by the best sires of California and out of 
great mares. 

These mares are nearly all young. 

This will he the Best Sale ever held on the Coast, and the best advertised. Get in line and send in your entries early so as to secure a good position in the catalogue. 
Write for entry blanks, 



A carload from Los Angeles already CO&Slgned, 

Lottie Lynwood 

Full Sister to the Great SOalOIIia GW 2.05J 

Entered in over §100,000 worth of Stakes, all paid up on to date. Lottie Lyuwood is 
the fastest 2-year-old trotter in America. Had more speed as a yearling than her 
famous sister did at four vears old. 

Wenja 2:181 

A handsome mare and a good money winner. Will trot in 2:10 this year. Sired by 
Zolock 2:05%, dam Xaulahka 2:14 by Nutford 2:15. Wenja is an own sister to 
Prince Lock (2) 2:18, winner of Breeders Futurity of 1908. Is a great racing pros- 
pect and the best bred one for a brood m«re in California. 

TED HAYES, Pleasanton, sends 
Moy 2:07f One of the fastest and best bred mares in the 1'nited States. 
She is by the great sire Prodigal. 

ModiciUITI 2:13 by Geo. Ayeifa 18553. This is a very f aal and high-class 
mare that can win in her class. 

WALTER MABEN, I,os Angeles, consigns 

Queer Knight 2:13 A great race trotter and fine matinee horse. 

A Sensational Three-Year-Old of which mil particulars later. 

FRED WARD, Los Angeles, sends 

Explosion, bay mare by Stein way!, the best unmarked pacer in California. 
Can pace in 2:10. Would make great matinee mare. 

CHAS. De RYDER, Pleasanton. will sell 

Ten Head of High-Class Brood Mares, Colts and Fillies. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO., Live Stock Auctioneers, 



478 Valencia St., San Francisco 



oo<x><>^>>:<<"X<<<<<<<<<<<":: 



THE FARM 



Do not think because you can buy 
cheap some old mare that has been 
broken down, that has the heaves, is 
wind-broken or has any other ailment, 
that it will pay you to keep her to 
raise good colts. It won't. Sometimes 
it may happen that you may get a 
good colt, but it don't pay. 

Take a mare of any of these colors: 
black, brown, bay or gray, and breed 
to a jack that has big bone, a good 
head and back, good color — I prefer 
black — and good hips. Do not think 
the more daylight under a jack the 
better sire he is; you'll find yourself 
mistaken; after you have bred to a 
good jack that has proven himself a 
good breeder give the mare plenty of 
exercise; moderate work won't hurt, 
just so you don t overwork her. When 
working give oats and corn for morn- 
ing feed; at noon give some feed with 
a little green food, and at night add 
alfalfa. When running in pasture feed 
twice per day. When colts are due to 
arrive put mares in roomy stables or 
pasture to themselves. Do not feed 
much and let feed be oats and little 
corn, but do not feed hay in any form 
because it will ruin the shape of the 
mare's stomach. That's the reason so 
many pretty driving horses are spoiled ; 
they get potty. If you will not feed 
any green feed or hay at this period 
you will not have any potty mares. 

When colts are big enough to eat 
let them eat with their mothers till 
weaning time. Then put in pasture 
and feed twice per day. Be sure that 
the small ones have a chance as well 
as the larger ones. 

Feed oats, corn and alfalfa. We 
have found that oats and alfalfa are 
the best feed in the world for mules 
as well as horses, making them mus- 
cular, slick and giving lots of energy. 

Keep colts gentle and handle them 
often; that helps when selling time 
comes. 

A mule possesses keener instinct 



than the horse and for that reason he 
is easily trained and if you handle him 
firmly he will be useful for anything. 
Mules have proven themselves useful 
in the following ways: For going 
courting, for wedding and funerals, in 
new grounds, cotton patches, etc. 

There is always a ready sale for 
mules. Why not raise more mules? 



-o- 



Aim to give as much attention to the 
care of the skimmilk as to the cream 
or butter. If butter is made at home, 
the same care should be given to the 
buttermilk. The skimmilk and butter- 
milk may not be directly sold for 
money, yet when judiciously fed to 
pigs, poultry or calves they may rep- 
resent nearly one-half the dairy 
profits. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HI' MAX REHKIIT for Rhen- 
■adm, Nprulua, Wore Throat, ct«., it 

Is Invaluable. . ... 

■ x In. in,. „f CiMintlr ItaUlim f"W I* 

Warranted to (rive satlKfartbin l"rJ<<- W l.HO 
per bottle. Bold by (lniit(rl«t». or sent by ex- 
iii im. nhanrti paid, with fun directions tat in 

use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

THE LiWRE^WILLUaSCO.PlNT.CI.reliiid, Ohi- 



l'OIt SALE. 

Col. Dailey 39806, bay stallion by 
McKinney 2:11%, first dam Dixie by 
Chas. Derby 2:20, second dam Ramona 
(dam of W. Wood 2:07) by Anteeol 
2:16% (sire of dam of Sonoma Girl! 
2:05 l 4, etc.), third dam, the dam of 
Crescent 2:23%, by Captain Webdter 
1017:;. Col. Dailey is a rich bay, 15.3 
hands, and weighs 1100 pounds; is 
a handsome and exceedingly strong and 
well-made horse, and although never 
worked for speed, will make a fast 
trotter if trained. He should make a 
first-class stock horse, and his breed- 
ing is up to date. I have no use for a 
stallion, and on account of the great 
cost of hay and all kinds of feed, etc., 
I cannot carry the load I now have on 
my hands, and offer this horse for sale. 
Here is a bargain for some one who 
wants a first class and fashionably bred 
son of the groat McKinney. 

J. S. PHIPPEN, 

IMonsmnton. Cnl. 




THREE IN ONE OIL CO., 
102 New St., New York City- 



MMDIJUS 

Jan. 6th to Feb. 23rd. 
AT NEW ORLEANS 
SunsetExpress 

Takes you direct without change to the 
great carnival through orange groves of 
Southern California, the cotton and rice 
fields of the balmy south. 

Drawing-room sleepers, berths, sec- 
tions, drawing-rooms. Dining service 
unequalled, Observation Car, open air 
rotunda, Ladies' parlor. Gentlemen's 
Cafe, Library. 

Personally conducted Tourist excursion 
parties to Chicago, St. Louis, Cincin- 
nati, New Orleans and Washington 
every week. 

Write for special round trip rates and 
booklet — "Wayside Notes along the 
Sunset Route." Tells in detail of the 
attractions of the Sunset Route. 

Southern Pacific 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It Improves 
and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P. 
Kertel. Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland, Cal. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



TEN REASONS FOR INFERTILITY 
OF EGGS. 



First — Poor condition of breeding 
stock fatted or starved, or diseased out 
of all vigor. 

Second — Housing too closely, too 
warmly, too illy-supplied with pure, 
cold air. 

Third — Lack of vigor of life germs 
in the male. Quite often the case with 
the inbred. 

Fourth — Favoritism in the breeding 
pen. 



FOR SALE. 

IJOX REGI>ALDO,three-year-old rec- 
ord 2:15%, handsome brown colt by On 
Stanley, dam Belle Raymon by Raymon. 
He was one of the best colts on the 
Coast last year. He started In three 
races, was twice first, second once and 
Kot his record in the Breeders' Futurity 
Stake at Chico, trotting the last quarter 
in 30% seconds, last eighth in 15 sec- 
onds. He is going fine, and in the 
opinion of the best horsemen that have 
seen him, will trot a mile in 2:09 or bet- 
ter this year. 

MAC O. I>. 2:11% by Zolock. dam 
Kentucky Belle. Mac O. D. will pace in 
2:05 or better this year. One of the 
best going pacers on the Coast and has 
a great future as a race horse. Goes 
without straps. 

m i l l: RAYMON (dam of Don Reg- 
inaldo (3) 2:15%, Col. Green, trial 
2:10% to wagon), bay mare by Raymon 
12007, dam Gipsy by Gen. Booth, son of 
Geo. M. Patchen, etc. Standard and 
registered. In foal to On Stanley, sire 
of Don Reginaldo. 

LILLIAN YVKLBORN, dam of Lillian 
Zolock, two-year-old matinee record 
2:17%. She is in foal to Oh So, son of 
Nutwood 600. 

Both of the above mares are entered 
and paid up on in the Breeders' Futur- 
ity Stakes. 

ARIZOXA MeKINNEY, brown filly, 
two years old, by R. Ambush, dam Hytu 
by Happy Prince. Entered and paid up 
on in Breeders' Futurity, Stanford and 
Occident Stakes. 

All of the above horses are standard 
but Mac O. D. 

For price and particulars, address 

DR. F. A. RAMSEY, Riverside, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

I»nve Hynn 338-H. Race record 2.13, 
trial 2:07. Mahogany bay stallion, 15% 
hands high, weight 1100. Sired by An- 
teolo. he by Antevolo 2:19%: dam Ma- 
bel, own sister to Beautiful Bells, 
world's greatest brood mare. 

Dave Ryan's dam was Network by 
Echo 462, sire of the dam of Direct 
2:05%; second dain Nettie by Nutwood 
2:18%; third dam Emblem, grand dam 
of Arion 2:07% and Flying Jib 2:04; 
fourth dam, Young Portia by Mambrino 
Chief 11. 

With opportunity and in the right 
man's hands, this hor-se woull p-.ake 
a great sire. Address 

A. EDSTROM. 
130(5 52d nif., Oakland, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

mi.: Hal, foaled June 3, 1907. One 

of the best bred pacing colts in this 
country, combining the blood of Diablo 
2:09% and ihe famous old Tom Hal 
16934, grand sire of Star Pointer 
1:59m. This colt is a splendid individ- 
ual and is entered in the Breeders' Fu- 
turity. He is in training and shows 
fast. Any information regarding this 
colt. Address 

A. EDSTROM. 
130i> 52d are., Oakland, Cnl. 

FOR SALE. 

Four-year-old brown horse; no white. 
About 15.2 hands and weighs aDout 1050 
pounds. A pacer, sound, and has no 
blemishes. Worked a mile last year 
in June in his three-year-old form in 
2:14 and can step an eighth in 15 sec- 
onds any time in condition. Sired by 
Searchlight, first dam Bee Sterling 
(dnm of 4 in the list and 3 others with 
trials from 2:12 to 2:18), second dam 
Flash (dam of 5 in the list, etc.). No 
better bred pacer; should race in 2:10 
or better this year or pay for himself 
in the stud. For full particulars and 
price, address 

E. D. DUDLEY, Dixon, Cal. 



STANDARD STALLION FOR SALE. 

NEAR WAY 44272, handsome bay 
stallion, 8 years old, stands 17 hands, 
and weighs 1400 pounds. By Nearest 
32=562 (sire of Highfly 2 :04 Vi . Alone 
2:09%, etc.) by Nutwood Wilkes 22116, 
dam Camraa by Norway 5325, next 
dam Camilla by Ky. Prince, third dam 
Camille by Hambletonian 10. As an 
individual he cannot be beaten and his 
breeding is the most fashionable. For 
particulars address 

T. W. HAHSTOW, San Jose, Cal. 

Phone Black 2841. 

Stallion for Sals — Cheap. 

Eight years old, 16% hands, 1250 
pounds, stylish roadster; breeds large 
and smooth. Sire Stam B., dam Celia 
McC, she by Dexter Prince, second 
dam by Parker's Elect, and he by 
Electioneer. Little training as three- 
year-old showed quarter in :36; no 
training since. Write for full pedigree. 
WESTERN LOAN CO., 
Stoll Bldg., Sacramento, Cal. 



For Sale. 

DERBY DIRECT, pacer, blk. stallion, 
6 years old, 16 hands. Sired by Chas. 
Derby 2:20. First dam by Direct 2i05V4. 

Second dam by Echo, sire of dam of 

Direct 2:05%. 

This is a handsome, well-made horse 
and a fast natural pacer. Was worked 
a little as a three-year-old and stepped 
a mile in 2:19, last quarter in :31. 
Myrtha W., the only one of his foals 
ever trained, paced a half in 1:09 as a 
two-year-old. Can be seen at the 
Pleasanton race track at any time. 
For further particulars and price, 
write 

E. S. PARKER, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 

Two Standard Bred Stallions FOR SALE. 

Ono by Charles Derby, six years old, 
has paced miles in 2:12%, first-class 
individual, thoroughly broken, kind 

to drive. 

One by Mc-Klnney, weighs 1250 
pounds, high-class and handsome ani- 
mal in every respect. 

The dams of both of the above horses 
are registered for three generations 
back and are producers of speed. These 
two stallions are not only highly bred, 
but desirable animals in every respect. 
Will be sold cheap. For full particulars 
as to breeding, etc., address A. G. 
SHIPPEE, 247 W. Fremont St., Stock- 
ton, Cal. 

BROOD MARE FOR SALE 

Alta IN'ola 2:20. pacer, by Altamont 
3600, dam Nola (dam of Phoenix 
2:15%), by Nutwood 2:18%, second 
dam Belle Byron (dam of Claus Almont 
2.26%), by Bowman's Clark Chief, third 
dam Belle Hook by Almont 33, fourth 
dam by Bay Chief, fifth dam by Davy 
Crockett. 

Alta Nola is standard and registered, 
and in fine order. For price and further 
particulars, address. 

C. H. WILLIAMS, 
Box 151, Palo Alto, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Bay pacing gelding by Sidney Dil- 
lon, dam by Director. Has been a mile 
in 2:17, half in 1:03, and quarter in 29 

seconds. 

Brood mare by Antevolo, dam by 
Thad Stevens, next dam by Whipple's 
Hambletonian. In foal to Chestnut 
Tom and nominated in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity Stake No. 9. For further in- 
formation, apply to or address 

T. D. SEXTON, 
18U4 Market St.. Oakland, Cal. 

LIYEBY FOR SALE. 

One of the best in Southern Califor- 
nia. 20 horses in livery, 27 boarders at 
present. Everything is in first-class 
condition. For further information, 
write TJ. S. WOOD, Prop., Pomona, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Bay gelding. 5 years old, 16 hands, weighs 1200 
lbs., by Monterey 2:09%. dam Lady Urosvenor by 
Grosvenor 1833. Kind, gentle and sound, can be 
driven by a lady, and will work single and 
double. Price. ti'iO. Apply to 

DR. A. J. RYDBERG. San Rafael. 

WANTED. 

A serviceably sound, well-broke road horse, 
that has some speed. Limit price. $250. 

Send description and price to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
Box 417. San Francisco. 

Good Ones for Sale. 

Standard and registered stallions by McKin- 
ney. brood mares, high-class roadsters and colts 
at very reasonable prices. I am closing out all 
my horses at private sale. Am offering some of 
the best bred and best individuals on the Coast. 
Write for particulars. Address. 

THOMAS SMITH, 

1021 Georgia St.. Vallejo. Cal. 

Percheron Stud Colts for Sale. 

The undersigned offers for sale two high-grade 
Percheron-Xorman draft yearling stud colts, a 
black and a bay. weighing respectively 1:470 and 
1420 pounds. For prices and particulars address 

J. E. MONTGOMERY. 

Davis, Cal. 

THREE STALLIONS TO LEASE. 

One son and two grandsons of McKin- 
ney 2:11%, all out of gilt-edge dams. 
These stallions are all 16 hands, of good 
color, and each has fine large colts to 
show. They will be leased for the 
stud season of 1909 on liberal terms, but 
lessees will be required to give satis- 
factory security. For terms and pedi- 
grees, address 

A. B. RODMAN. Owner, 
Woodland, California. 



FAIRMONT 
Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The most superbly situated Ho- 
tel in the world — overlooking 
the Bay of San Francisco and 

City. 

Headquarters Army and Navy. 

The Social Center of City. 

Convenient to Business and 
Theater Sections. Reached by 
street cars from every direction. 
Only 5 minutes from ferry. 
Single Room with Bath, $2.50, 

$3. $3.50. $4. $5. $6, $7. $10. 
Suits with Bath, $10.00 upwards. 

Under Management of 

PALACE HOTEL COMPANY 

John C. Klrkpatrlck, Manager. 



"HOWARD SHORTHORNS "-QUINTO 
HERD. — 77 premluma, California State 
Fairs 1902-S-4. Registered cattle of 
beef and milking: families for sale. 
Write ua what you want. 
HOWARD CATTLE CO., San Mateo. 

GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERT9-GLIDE 

FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 
Glide Grade — % French and Vi Spanish 
Merino. 

— Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams. — 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 297, Home Telephone, 
Sacramento, Cal. Dixon, Cal. 



W. HIGGINBOTTOM 
LIVE STOCK AUCTIONEER 

Office with E. Stewart St Co. 
297 Valencia St. S. F. 
Branch Office With 
Star Horse Market, 

Fresno, Cal. 
Write for Terms and Dates. 

WANTED. 



JACK FOR SALE. 



Weighs 1,000 pounds, is well turned, 
good looker and without blemish. Is a 
prompt worker. Apply to 
9. B. WRIGHT, 

■ anta Rosa, Cal. 



A thoroughly experienced young man wishes a 
position as instructor at a riding academy, or 
with stock farm breaking and fitting polo ponies. 

Address. W. C. care of Breeder and Sportsman. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Dealers la PAPER 

1400-1460 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Blake, Moffltt St Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall St Co., Portland, Oregon. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., 

High Class Art 

— in — 

HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 

Artlstle Dealgnlag. 
141 Valencia St. San Frandaoo. 

STUD BOOKS FOR SALE. 

The first four volumes of Bruce 's Ameri- 
can Stud Book, elegantly bound in 
Morocco, will be sold cheap for cash or 
exchanged for later volumes. 
Address this office, 

BREEDER snd SPORTSMAN. 

STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

Owing to the death of my husband— Mr. David 
Bryson— I have for sale a Clydesdale stallion 
(Buffalo Bob) eight (8) years old; weighs 2000 
lbs. when in good fleas. 

Also a standard bred trotting stallion (Pavo 
McKinney), 7 years old. weighs 1100 lbs. .Sired 
by Guy McKinney. Registered No. 387S:i. Both 
horses are sound and gentle, good dispositions 
and breed well. 

MRS. M. E. BRYSON. 

Linden, San Joaquin Co., Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Meribet. Standard and Registered. Vol. 16, A. T. R. 

Bay mare, 16 hands, seven years old, by 
Owyhee (Rec. 2:11), out of Inex (dam of Our 
Jack 2:18%, Owynex 2:22%, and Alamo 2:29%) by 
Sweepstakes. Broken, but used mainly for 
brood mare. Her two foals by Lynwood W. are 
very promising. Price, if sold before being bred, 
$300. C. B. WAKEFIELD. 

1521 19th St.. Sacramento, Cal. 



RACING! 




New California 
Jockey Club 

OAKLAND RAGE TRACK 



First Race at 1:40 p. m. 

Six or more races each week day, 
rain or shine. 

For special trains stopping at the 
track, take S. P. Ferry, foot of Market 
street; leave at 12, thereafter every 20 
minutes until 1:40 P. M. No smoking 
in the last two cars, which are re- 
served for ladies and their escorts. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

620 Oetavis St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 2074. Ssn Frsneiseo, Cal 

WM. F. EGAN, M. R. C. V. S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

1150 Golden Gate Ave. 

Branch Hospital, corner Wnbster and 
Chestnut Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof, Acid Proof, Fire Re- 
sisting. 
Hi > \ i > l | | | & CO., 
118 to 124 Flrnt St., San Francisco, Cnl. 

JOHN BARDUHN 

Successor to Kavanagh <fc Barduhn 

THE PALACE HOTEL TAILORS 

has removed to his permanent quarters 
No. 7 Sutter St., nesr Market, 

San Francisco. Cal. 



LAMENESS from a Bone Spavin, Ring 
Bone, Splint, Curb, Side Bone or elml- 

lar trouble can be stopped with 



ABSo 



RBINE 



Pull directions In pamphlet with each 
bottle. S2.00 a bottle at dealers or delivered. 
Horse Book 9 D free. 
AISSOKHINK, JR., for mankind, tl 
\ a bottle, removes Painful Swelling!), En- 
J* larged Qlands. Goitre. Wens, Bruises, Var! 
cose Veins. Varicosities, Old Snres, Allays Pain. 
W. F. YOUNG, P D F., 54 Monmouth St., Springfield, Miss. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. : Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.: F. W. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cel.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



„ft GO PA/84 



SKA 



r %WAi 

CAPSULES 



1 



J? 

J- 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



T H ■ BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



la 



Fifth — Feeding condiments to hurry 
up prolific egg laying. 

Sixth — Lack of the right element in 
the food to produce an egg fit to hatch 
a perfect chick. 

Seventh — Rough handling of the 
eggs before or during incubation. This 
is not a cause, but an effect. 

Eighth — Keeping eggs too long be- 
fore inoculation. The air, the heat, 
destroying the life germ. 

Ninth— Lousy breeders and lousy 
houses. 

Tenth — Keeping too many females 
for one male. — Poultry World. 



o 

There may be at least four sources 
of profit in dairying — butter, skimrnilk, 
calves and manure. It is difficult to 
say from which one of these the most 
profit may be derived. If the stock is 
pure bred, the calves may bring the 
most. Some men actually make the 
greatest net profits from the manure. 
Most dairymen make it from the 
cream. 



As they 
sometimes are 




WALTON, Ky. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. T.: 
Dear Sirs: I think you have the best 
or. the market. I cured a very valuable 
horse of two very bad splints and thor- 
oughpin with your "Save-the-Horse," 
purchased of Dow's Drug Store, Cin- 
cirnati, Ohio. Very truly, 

J. H. ROGERS. 




December 5, 1908. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. T.: 
Gentlemen: I want to inform you 
that my horse has been cured of bone 
spavin by using your "Save-the-Horse." 
Aftpr applying "Save-the-Horse" as per 
ynur directions, he was going sound 
and has been so ever since. I gladly 
recommend your remedy, for it saved 
my horse. I enclose a small photograph 
of the horse. Very truly, 

NATHAN SIMONS. 

H. D. BAOGLEY 

Cassopolis. Mich. 

Cassopolis, Mich.. November 24. 1903. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Gentlemen: Enclosed please And 
check for $5.00 for which please send 
me a bottle of "Save-the-Horse" Spavin 
Cure. 

My first bottle was used on a pacing 
horse with two bad spavins that had 
received no end of treatments (before I 
got him), such as blistering, firing, etc. 
He was very lame. I used one bottle 
treating both spavins at the same time, 
and "Save-the-Horse" entirely cured 
the lameness. I used another bottle of 
"Save-the-Horse" on a ring-bone and 
am more than pleased with results. 

You need not send any guarantee, for 
having used two bottles I know pretty 
well what it will do, consequently the 
guarantee is useless to me. Yours truly, 
H. D. BADGLEY. 



"Save-the-Horse" permanently curea 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thorouKhpln, 
splint, shoe boll, wlndpuff. Injured ten- 
dons, and all lameness, without scar or 
loss of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
$8 Per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as 
the best legal talent could make It 
Send for copy and booklet. 
At DruKKlita and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Blng-hamton, N. Y. 
Formerly Troy N. Y. 
D. K. NEWELL, 
SO Bayo Vista Avenne, Oakland, Cat. 



Lice 



Sample FREE 



(Write for It.) 



IT WILL DO THE WORK AND 
YOD WILL WANT MORE. 

TOBACCO DUST 

A positive and recognized remedy for 
poultry lice. The acknowledged sure 
ingredient for sheep dip. Guaranteed 
full strength, absolutely fresh, and 
as good as any in any market. 

Sure death to lice on 

HORSES, SHEEP, POULTRY, 

and all other kinds of live stock. 

Quotations f. o. b. San Francisco. All 
shipments may be returned within 10 
days and your money refunded if our 
Dust does not please you in every way. 
Samples mailed postpaid upon request. 

In 100 lb. lots, only 4 1 2 c. per lb. 
In 300 '« " " 4c. " " 
In 500 " " " 3%c. " " 

Send a postal and get sample 
Tobacco Dust and our three com- 
plete new catalogues postpaid. 

It pays to buy by mail for cash. 
Our prices are the lowest Cut Rates 
and we prove it. 

The Owl Drug Co., 

Mail Order Dept.. 611 Mission St., 

San Francisco 

Mention this paper. 



TOOMEY 

T W O - W H E E L E R S 

Are the Acknowledged Leaders. 




We build Sulkies In all sizes, Pneumatic Road 
and Track ( arts. High-Wheel Road and Break- 
lug C arts. Send for latest catalogue. 

S. TOOMEY & CO., 
Canal Dover, Ohio, U. S. A. 



VALUABLE VETERINARY 
BOOK FREE 

Write today for "Vrtrrlnnry 
Experience"— ft book that will 
enable you to l>e your own vet- 
erinarian- It In an Invaluable 
treatise on the borne, borwo 
dlMMM IM the treatment* and 
remedied which cure. Among 
other thing* or vital Importance 
to every horse owner, It Mil 
— how and why 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR 

cure* Curb, Splint, Rparln UmrnrM, Bony Growth", 
Bpralnn, Hwelllngfi, Shoe BoIIk and Founder, Distemper 
and Colic. Also makes the befit \vg and body wash. 

Tuttle'M Elixir hon for many yearn been the main *t*y 
of veterinarians and operators of large stables every- 
where. 

It Is quick and sure In action, non-polsonou*. cannot 
Injure, pain or blemish the horse. Write for the proofs 
of our claims. If yourdealerduesn't keep Tuttle's we'll 
send It by express. Don't experiment. (*et Tuttte's and 
be aura. Ask also forTuttlo'* Amer 4 can Worm and Con- 
dition Powders and Hoof Ointment. 

Bend as your name and address now, so we can mall 
you the Free Book. 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR CO., 52 Beverly St., Boston, Mass. 

WILLIS A. SHAW, Los Aafeles. California Agent 




The Stallion Number 

—OF THE — 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and he 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as It will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, new. 
and articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 

As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many 
owners are not ready to say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should hav<! 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 

THERE'S A REASON 

why STUDEBAKEE wagons, vehicles and harness stand 
for absolute satisfaction. One reason is the fact that the 
firm of STVDEBAKER lias heen engaged in the manu- 
facture of these goods for more than half a century. The 
products of the STUTjEBAKER factory to-day represent 
the most perfected American design and the highest skill. 
The moment you purchase anything to which is at- 
tached the name STVDEBAKER, that moment you as- 
sure yourself of absolute satisfaction. 



| Before You Buy 

« a wagon, a vehicle, a set of harness or even an automo- 
I bile see the STUDEBAKEE dealer. Let him show you 
| why the STVDKBA KER products lasl so long and give 
8 such good service. It will pav VOU well to investigate. 




/ Fremont at Mission Phone, Douglas 3O00 / 

New Edition of John 8plan'a Book 



tt 



Life With the Trotter" 



Price, «3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotwr gives us a clear iniight into the ways and mean* to t>e adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work Is replete with Interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Hbeeper and Sfortsman, P. O. Drawer U7. San Francisco, Cal. 

Pacific Bldg.. Cor. Market and Fourth 8ts. 



14 



THI BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 




Hiamond Mc - - 2:26% 

Delia Lou - - - 2:27% 

Kinney G. P. - - 2:24)2 

Debutante (3) trial - 2:19% 

Kalitan 13) trial - 2:27 

.lohn Christensen Ci) trial 2:28 

Lou Kinney (3) trial - 2:30 

Armon Lou (8) trial - 2:30 

Harold B. P., trial - 2:10% 
Kinney de Lopez (2) % -1:12 

Four Stockings (2) 54 - 1 :12 

Princess Lou (2) % - :35% 
Lolo B. (2) % - - - :35 



Kinney Lou 2:07! 

Reg. No. 37621. 

Will make the Season of 1909 at the 

Salinas Race Track Comniencing Feb - 15th 

All mares bred in 1909 will be nominated In all the 
futurities on the Pacific Coast free of charge to the 
owner. 

Pasture for mares at reasonable rates but no responsibility 
assumed for accidents or escapes. 

Terms: $100 the Season 



With usual return privilege in cat 
For further particulars addres 



■ mare does not prove in foal. 



BUDD DOBLE, Salinas, Cal. 




ZolQCk 2:05 1 



Reg. No. 
34471. 



Terms: 
$75. 

Return 
privilege 



Sire of 

Sherlock Holmes 2:06 K. Ambush - 
Bystander - - 2:07K Velox - - 
Delilah - - - 2:0754 Boton de Oro 
Josephine - - 2:07}£ Mc O. D. - - 

8 others in 2:30 
By McKinney 2:11%, dam. the great 
mare. Gazelle 2:11% 

Will make the Season of 1909 at 



2:09% 

m 

brood 



McKinney's Fastest Entire Son 



AGRICULTURAL PARK, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

For further particulars apply or address 
N. S. YOUNG, University Station, Los Angeles 



NEAREST 35562 



Record 2:22 



s 



(Sire of Highliy 2:04%, Alone 2:09%, half-mile record :59%; Just It (3) 2:19V4, Joe 
Cans 2: 1 !•»•.. Tru.- Heart 2:l«*i, etc), by Nntntmd WHUcn 2:1«V 2 (sir.- of Copa de 
Oro 2:03%, Tidal Wave 2:06*i, Miss Idaho 2 09%, John A. McKerron 2:04%, the 
fastest trotting stallion in America, and 40 others in 2:30, and the dams of Mona 
Wilkes 2:03%, Miss Georgia 2:08%, Lady Mowry 2:09%, Aerolite (3) 2:11%, trial 
2:05%, etc.); dam the great brood mare Inmir, the greatest producing daughter 
of Director 2:17. Nearest is full brother to John A. McKerron 2:04% (sire of 14 
in 2:30, all two and three-year-olds, 10 of which entered the list in 1908), and 
Lord Alwin, sire of Ella M. R. (2)' 2:16%, the only one of his get yet trained, 
hnui *40 the season, with return privilege. 

NEAREST McKINNEY 40698 

Six-year-old brown stallion by McKinney 2:11'/,. dam Muud J. C. by Nearest 
2:22' ■: second dam Fanny Menlo (dam of Claudius 2:13%) by Menlo 2:21% (son 
of Nutwood 600); third dam Nellie Anteeo, by Anteeo 2:16% (sire of the dams of 
Sonoma Girl 2:05%, W. Wood 2:07, Directum Kelly 2:08% and Gray Gem 2:09%); 
fourth dam Fanny Patchen, by Geo. M. Patchen Jr. 2:27. Nearest McKinney is a 
grand individual, 16 hands, weighs 1,200 pounds and a fast trotter. As a four- 
year-old worked a mile in 2:15, last half in 1:04, on a half-mile track, and eighths 
in 15 seconds. The only one of his get yet broken to harness shows phenomenal 

si i Terms: $.*«> the season, with return privilege In case does not prove in 

foal. Pasture $4 per month, no barb wire, no responsibility assumed for acc idents 
or escapes. *' '4IIU 

Both horses will make the season of 1909 at my place, 1042 Alameda avenue, 
San Jose. For tabulated pedigrees and further particulars, address 

T. W. BARS TOW, San Jose, Cal. 



C. F. MOREL 



Successor to 



J. O'KANE CO. 



Sheldon Building, 457 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

A Full Line of Highest Grade Harness. Turf and 
Leather Goods. 

Everything in Horse Toggery. 

Agent for AVilcoxson's Perfection Liniment — $2 a bottle. Campbell's 
and all other well-known remedies. Local orders given prompt at- 
tention. Remember the new address. 



C. F, MOREL, Syccessor t0 J ' °' KANE go.. 



Sheldon Building, 
457 Market Street, 
San Francisco. 



Stallion Folders, 

Stallion Cards and Posters 
COMPILED and PRINTED 

Send particulars as to place, terms, fee, description and breeding as 
far as you know and wb will no the rest. 

Proof submitted before the work is printed. Half-tone Pictures 

made from Photographs. 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS $1.00 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

Pacific Bldg., Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 




THE ARABIAN STALLIONS 



Introductory Offer to Breeders: 



WILL 
STAND THE 

SEASON 

$50 



Mares sent for and accommodated at foaling time. 

Write for particulars to 



EL RANCHO DE LAS ROSAS DESERT ARABIAN STUD, 



The FOUNDATION BLOOD OF 
ALL GOOD HORSE STOCKS 



thoroughbred and standard bred 
in every case trass back to it. 
Even the Mustang owes his en- 
durance to the Arab strain. The 
Arab gives speed over long dis- 
tances, draft power, bottom, do- 
cility, intelligence, beauty of 
coat and conformation. The 
half-Arab is an ideal combin- 
ation saddle and driving horse, 
suitable for the show-ring or 100 
miles a day. 



ALMA, 

Santa Clara County, Cal. 



The Last Chance 

\NNVNN\\SSN\S\\\\\\\>N\N\\\.N\\NVS\V*\ 

for California Breeders 

To Send Mares to ZOMBRO 2:11 

McKINNEY'S GREATEST SON AND GREATEST SIRE OF HIS AGE. 

Zombro will be taken East next Spring and will not be returned to California. 
He will make a fall and winter season at my place, No. 3727 Figueroa street, Los 
Angeles. Zombro leads all trotting bred stallions as a sire of extreme speed 
this year, and his get have won more money than the get of any sire on this 
Coast. He has been the leading Pacific Coast sire for three years- — 1906, 1907 and 
190S. Sixteen of his get have entered the 2:30 list this year, and while Bingen 
and Peter the Great each have one more in 2:30 list. Zombro leads all stallions 
as a sire of new 2:10 and 2:15 performers. He has four new ones in 2:10, three of 
them trotters, six new 2:15 performers, and seven new 2:20 performers. He now 
has eight in 2:10, 16 in 2:15 and 24 in 2:20, out of a total of 48 in the 2:30 list. 
Half of his standard performers have records below 2:20. He Is the greatest speed 
sire of the age. Write me for terms. 

GEO. T. BECKERS, Owner. 
3727 S. Figueroii St., Lou Angele*, Cal. 

KINNEY ROSE (trial) 2:13; 

By McKinney 2:1134; dam Golden Rose by l-'alrose; 
second dam Lady Harper by Alaska : third dam by Algona : 
fourth dam by Oddfellow, thoroughbred. 

Kinney Rose is a dark bay stallion, stands 15.8 hands 
and weighs 1200 lbs. He is a splendid horse in every re- 
spect, handsome, intelligent, of good disposition, and in the 
opinion of many good judges is one of the fastest trotting 
sons of the great McKinney. 

There are but two colts in Kinney Rose's first crop and 
they are coming two. Roth of those coltj can show a 2:40 
gait and that with limited handling. At a meeting held by 
the Woodland Driving club, Nov. 29th, Kinney H..a yearling 
by Kinney Rose, won the yearling stake taking the first and third heats in 2:50 
and 2:51 (the fastest heats trotted by a yearling in a race in 1908), being nosed 
out the second heat in 2:51 and this 7 weeks after being taken out of pasture. 
This colt 3 or 4 days before Thanksgiving was driven a mile by Det Bigelow on 
the Woodland track in 2:42. 




Season of '09 at the CHICO RACE TRACK. 



Terms: $35 forth' Season. Return privilege 



The Norman Stallion Tom Terms: $15— $20 to insure 

8 years old, weighs 1,800 lbs. A first-class individual and very active horse. 

Yearlings by both of the above stallions will be at the track on exhibition. 

Address, CHRIS HASIIAGEN, Manager, Chico, Cal. 

Wtt HASHAGEX, Owner. 

A Game Race 
Horse in the Stud 



Athasham 



Race Rec. 2:09 1 . 
Reg. No, 45026. 




Ray stallion, stands 15.3 weighs 1.150. Sired by Athadon (1) 
2 :27 I sire of The Donna 2 :07 4 4. Athasham 2 :09%. .Sue 2:12, Lister- 
ine 2:1:!! a and s others in 2:3d) : dam. the great brood mare ( ora 
Wickersliam (also dam of Nogi (3) 2:17%, (4) 2:10H>. w inner of %■ 
year-old trotting division Breeders Futurity l'.MI7ainl Occident and 
Stanford Stakes of same year I, by .lunio 2 :22V£(sire of dams of ( leo. 
G. 2:05%, etc.). Athasham has a great future before him as a 
sire. He is bred right and made right, and has every qualifica- 
tion one can expect in a sire. He has been timed in 2:06% in a 
race, and his courage is unquestioned. 

He will make the Season oi 1909 al Orchard Farm, Fresno, 

Cal., for a Fee of $25. Approved man - 

For further particulars address this place. 

D. L. BACHANT, R. R. 1, Fresno, Cal. 



lilton Gear m 



Sired by Harry dear 23382 (sire of Harry Logan 
I 2:12?4. etc. ) by Echo 462 (sire 16 in 2:30 list, 11 pro- 

ducing sons. 22 producing daughters), first dam 
O Lulu X. by Dawn 6707. Record 2:\H%; 2nd dam 
" Alice by Brow ns McClellan. 

- will make the SEASON OF 1909 at the 



Fee: $25 the Season. 

For further particulars 
apply to or address 



I'sual return 
privilege. 

J. DEPOISTER, 



Fresno 



Fair Grounds 

Fresno, Cal. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



McKINNEY, 2:1 IX- 

Sire of 20 in 2 : 10, 49 in 2:15, 66 in 2:20, 100 in 2:30. 
Sire of the sires of 94 in 2:30 (17 in 2:10) and 
Dams of 5 in 2:10. 

GREATEST PRODUCER AND TYPICAL SIRE THE WORLD HAS EVER KNOWN. 

McKinney stallions are few and are worth from eight times his fee 
up. Book to others any time - to McKinney while yon may. 
Only a few outside mares will be accepted. 

gjr<$ Sty* Empire (Situ Jantra. new"™. 



Saturday, January 30, 1909.] 



THK BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



II 



EARTH'S WONDERS 



Yosemite— 

Open the year 'round. The quick way is Santa 
Fe to Merced; thence Yosemite Valley Railroad. 

Grand Canyon— 

The biggest thing in the world. El Tovar hotel 
on brink of Canyon. 
Under Fred Harvey management, one of the finest 
hotels in southwest. — Our folders tell. 

H. K. GREGORY, A. 8. P. A.. San Francisco. JOHN. J. BYRNE, A. P. T. M . Los Angeles 



r 


I 


5 


Santa Fe 




I 


jj 



Campbell's 



EMOLLIC 
IODOFORM 



HARNESS i 



GALL REMEDY 



FOR 

HARNESS S SHOULDER GALLS. BARB! 

CALKS. SCRATCHES AND OTHER 
AILMENTS OFTHESKIN. , 



Gall Remedy 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, 
CRUPPER SORES and SADDLE GALLS 
there Is none superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS 
USUAL 

For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, 
SCRATCHES, Blood Poisoned SORES, 
ABRASIONS of the SKIN It has no 
equal. 

Its use will absolutely prevent Blood 
Poisoning. We placed It on the market 
relying wholly on Its merits for success. 
The sales of 1906 were 100 per cent 
greater than the aggregate sales of 
Gall Remedy preceding that year. This 
Increase was entirely due to its MER- 
ITS, and it Is THE GALL REMEDY OF 
THE 20th CENTURY. 

It is quick and sure for those trouble- 
some skin cracks under the fetlock 
which Injure and often lay up race 
horses. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1906. Serial Number 1219. 



All Trainers Should Keep It in Their Stables. 
PRICE— 25c, 50c and $1.00. 

(Read our ad. on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper) 
Jas. B. Campbell & Co., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison St., Chicago, Illinois. 

Sold by all dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not In stock ask them 
to write any Jobber for it. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



- "* \ 

No road too rough. Has 
cushion tires and carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength . Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding. and does away 
with all horse motion . Furn- 
ished with Pneumatic tires. 



W. J. KENNEY, 



Sales agent for 
California. 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 

53I Valencia Street, San Francisco 



AXWORTHY, 2:15^. 

Sire of 59 in 2:30, including 

World's greatest trotting mare World's greatest three-year-old 

Hamburg Belle. 2:04% Gen. Watts (3), 2:06% 

If you wish to book - be quick while his book is sti'l open. 
For particulars, mention this paper and address, 

ulhp Smpirp (flito jPanuB, Lexington, Ky. 




Take'lllnTime, 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 

act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, Wlndpuffs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 

Ithas Baved th'iusaml* of good horses from the peddler's 
cart SBd the broken-down horse market. Mr. C. H. Plck- 
I ens, of Minneapolis. Minn., whoconducts one of 'thelaigestl.very stal.lrsln the Northwest 
writes as follows: I have been using Qulnn'a lOlnlmanl I ..r some time and with the greatest , 
sureess X Uike pleasure In recommending It to my fi lends, ho horseman slum Id be with- 
I outltiiihis stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, wlndputrs and all bunches It has no equal." 
< Price SI. 00 per bottle. Bold by all druggists or sen t by mail. Write us for circulars, 

tSSSflff&J** W.B.Eddy&Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



GOLCHER BROS. 

( Formerly of Clabrough. (iolcher <$: Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phon. Temporary 1883. 5 ,Q ^ 5^ f mdm 

"NEW SCHULTZE" 

Smokeless Shot Gun Powder 



THE OLD-TIME FAVORITE 



Hard Grain, 



Smokeless, 
Uniform, 



Clean Burning 



Stability Guaranteed 

Loaded in All First-Class Shells 



Ask Your Dealer for 



"New Schultze" 



A Powder for the Most Critical! 



MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS. 



E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Delaware. 





P.xtra rlt 



jhOOtjng. with even distribution 



id 



"iH'i m Hon. nre essential Qualities' 

*s for the very best success 



thnt a gun must i»i" 
at the traps. 

iHiih'h i.iin^ Iium' n world-wide reputation for 

their siinerior shooting QUSllt ll 

" iioii" I'.iiwnrds , tin' veteran barrel borer, who 
HrJtborea Ithaca Ouni In Iffl \t itjll "t H — his 
experience at your command. 

[that ii ' . 1 1 1 1 i- gimninl"'-'! in ever) | ui r t — 

hammerleM guns are fitted with tiir-" Knits and 

iil iiiilin springs , which nr.' ^mmrmccrHnn^r 
against breakage, weakness or lost tension. 

Send for Art Catalog and special prices; is 
grades $17.75 net to $100.00 list. 

Pacific Coast Branch— Phil B. IVkeart Co.. 
717 Market St., Pan Francisco. 

ITHACA GUN COMPANY 

T> e p f-. 1.5 
ITHACA, N. "Y. 



Distemper Always Dangerous. 

Valuable horses fall ensy victims to this often fatal dis- 
ease. When It once breaks out It spares none. To prevent Its 
spread and cure the sick, put a teaspoonful of CRAFT'S IJIS- 
TKMI'KK Cl'IlK in the feed or on the lonKUe onee a day and 
your trouble will soon end. Oct It from your druKKiHt or wo 
wlil send It prepaid, 50 cents and $1.00 a bottle. I). K. NKWIiLiL, 
56 Bayo Vista avenue, Oakland, Cab, Pacific Coast Agent. 




16 



THI BRI1D1R AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 30, 1909. 



Fine 
Harness 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 




Reming ton. 



AUTOLOADING SHOT GUN 



SLIDE TO WORK 

With the left hand. Right hand polls trigger. Recoil ejects, cocks and 
reloads. Solid hreech protection against "Mow bucks." Safety just before 
trigger finger prevents accidental discharge. Full line of double guns if 
you prefer. 

The Ideal Duck Gun. List Price $40 and Upwards. 

Remington Arms Company 

llion, New York. Agency, 313 Broadway, New York. 




WINCHESTER 

.22 CALIBER REPEATING RIFLE 

The Model 1906 Handling Three Cartridges 



This Winchester repeater, which is now made to handle either .22 
Short, .22 Long or .22 Long Rifle Rim Fire Cartridges, is the biggest 
value in a rifle ever offered. It is made with the same skill and care 
as Winchester rifles of larger caliber, which means that it is accurate, 
reliable and well finished. It takes down easily and packs in a 
small compass, making it a handy adjunct to any sportsman's 
kit. The list price is only $10.50 and it retails for less. 

Winchester Gans and Ammunition — the Red W Brand — are sold everywhere. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



FOR FIELD and TRAP SHOOTING 
Hold All the Best Records 

None "Just as Good" 

CARRIED BY THE BEST TRADE 

SMELTING & LEAD CO., 

San Francisco. 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 6, 1909. 



The Greatest Ever Held 

FRED H. CHASE & CO. 

Announce the Second Annual 

Pleasanton Sale! 

3 Days-March 25, 26, 27, 1909--3 Days 

The Opening Day will be devoted to a complete dispersal of the horses of the famous 

Nutwood Stock Farm, 

( Kstate 'if Martin Carter, Esq., Irvington, Oat. ) 
Sixty head of the beat bred trotters and pacers in California, including the great sire 

Nutwood Wilkes 2:16! 

Sire of John A. McKerron 2:043a, t'opa de <>ro 2:033a, Tidal Wave 2:0<> 3 4. 
Grandsire of Highfly 2 :04)£. Sire dams of Mona Wilkes 2:0:>3,i, San Fran- 
cisco 2:07%, etc. 

Lord Alwin 



Full brother to the (ireat John A. McKerron 2:043a' and sire of 
2:ll> 3 4, fastest Pacific Coast two-year-old trotter of 1906. 



Ella M. R. 



FOALS OK 1908. 

liny till? I.y Nutwood Wilkes (lam by 
Honnic Direct -:<»:") 1 4 . second dam 
by Searchlight 2:0314. 

Hay filly by Lord Alwin. dam by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, second dam by Az- 
moor. 

Bay noli by Greco B.. dam by Chestnut 
Tom 2:15. second dam, the dam of 
John A. McKerron by Director. 

Bay cell by Bon Voyage 2:12%. dam 
full sister to John A. McKerron 
2:04%. 

Hay colt by Lord Alwin. dam by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, second dam by Cali- 
fornia Nutwood. 

Hay colt bv Nutwood Wilkes, dam Bx- 
eella, dam of Ella M. R. (2) 2:10%, 
by Monbells. second dam Expres- 
sive (3) 2:1 2 >£. by Electioneer. 

Bay coll by Lord Alwin, dam by Slam 
B. 2:11'|. second dam bv McKinney 
2:11V4. 

FOALS OF 1907. 

Chestnut Uly by Lord Alwin. dam by 
chestnut Tom 2:15, second dam 
dam of John A. McKerron 2:04 V4 
by Director. 

Bay Uly by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by 
Altivo 2:lN'/2. own brother toiPalo 
Alto 2:08%, second dam by Boodle 
2:12%. 

Bay ally by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Kx- 
cella, dam of Ella M. K. (2) 2:lli'4 
by Monbells. second dam Expres- 
sive (3) 2:12% by Electioneer. 

Bay ally by Lord Alwin. dam Lida Car- 
ter (3) 2:20 by Stam B. 2:11'4. 
second dam Lida W. 2:18%. dam 
of Nutwool Wilkes, bv Nutwood 
2:18%. 

FOALS OF 1006. 

Bllfl M. It. <2l 2:l«%. b. f. by Lord 
Alwin, dam Excella by Monbells. 
second dam Expressive (3) 2:12% 
by Electioneer. This filly was the 
fastest two-year-old trotter of the 
Pacific Coast last year. 

Bay ally by Lord Alwin, dam K. W. by 
Klatawah (3) 2:05%. second dam 
Queen C. 2:28 y, bv Nutwood 
Wilkes. 

Hay Ally by Bonnie McK. (son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11% and Bonsilene 2:14% 
by StambouD. dam by Nutwood 
Wilkes, second dam bv Albert W. 

2:20. 

Bay Mlly by Star Pointer 1:59%. dam 
Grey Witch by Nutwood Wilkes, 
second dam Little Witch 2:22% by 
Director. 

Cheatnnt lllly by Lord Alwin. dam 
Georgie B. 2:12% (dam of Miss 
Georgie 2:08%) by Nutwood 
Wilkes, second dam by California 
Nutwood. 

Hay Ally by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by 
Searchlight 2:03%, second dam by 



Director 2:17, third dam Lida W. 
2:18%, dam of Nutwood Wilkes, 
etc., by Nutwood 2:18%. 



SOME OF THE lilt (M)l> M ARES. 

(icoritlc II. 2:12%. dam of Miss Georgic 
2:08%. foaled 1894. by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam by California Nut- 
wood. Bred to Lord Alwin. 

Irvinuton (>lrl. foaled 1902, by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Lou G., dam of 5, by- 
Albert W. Bred to Lord Alwin. 

Mamie It., foaled I SOS. own sister to 
John A. McKerron 2:04%, etc., by 
Nutwood Wilkes, dam In gar, dam 
of fi, by Director. Bred to Kinnev 
Lou 2:07%. 

I.oimmc Carter 2:24. foaled 19114. by 
Chestnut Tom 2:15. dam Ingar, dam 
of 6, by Director. Bred to Kinnev 
Lou 2:07%. 

Record Searcher, foaled 1 902. by Search- 
light 2:0314, dam Zeta Carter, dam 
of Chestnut Tom 2:15, by Director. 
Bred to Lord Alwin. 

Mora Mac. black marc by McKinney, 
dam Fontanita 2:24% by Antevolo. 
Bred to Lord Alwin. 

Honnic l.iclil. foaled |9nl. by Bonnie 
Direct 2:05%, dam Record Searcher 
by Searchlight 2:03%. Bred to Star 
Pointer 1:59%. 

Excella. foaled 1! lam of Ella M. 

R. (2) 2:16%. by Monbells 2:23 
i son of Mendocino and Beautiful 
Bells), dam Expressive (3) 2:12%, 
by Electioneer. Bred to Lord Al- 
win. 

Lida Carter CI I 2:20. trial 2:12V4 last 
year, foaled 1903. by Stam B. 2:11%, 
dam Lida W. 2:18%, dam of Nut- 
wood Wilkes 2:lfi%, etc.. by Nut- 
wood 2:18%. Not bred. Mr. Cartel- 
intended to race iter this year. 

Little Branch 2:22'/,. trial 2:16, foaled 
1900, by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by 
Long Branch. 

Staiuhia, foaled 1 !Mi 4 . by Stam B. 2:11%, 
dam Mora Mac by McKinney. Bred 
to Nutwood Wilkes. 

Muriel I". 2:2!»%, foaled 1902. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes, dam Lou G., dam of 
5, by Albert W. 

AllroKO. foaled 1901. by Altivo 2:18 %, 
dam Lustroso by Boodle 2:12%, 
second dam Luta by Electioneer. 
Bred to Nutwood Wilkes. 

K. W., foaled 1901, by Klatawah 2:05%, 
dam Queen C. 2:28% by Nutwool 
Wilkes. 

Hay mare, foaled 190 1. bv Searchlight 
2:03%, dam Irvington Girl by Nut- 
wood Wilkes. 

Sorrel mare, foaled 1904. by Nutwoo 1 
Wilkes, dam Zeta Carter, dam of 
Chestnut Tom 2:15 by Director. 

Search Uda, foaled 1903. bv Search- 
light 2:03%. dam Lida W. 2:18%, 
dam of Nutwood Wilkes, etc., by 
Nutwood, and many others. 



THE SECOND DAY 

Sensational consignment from other owners, headed by the jjreat two-year-old 

Lottie LynWOOd (Full sister to SONOMA GIRL 2:051) 

entered in $100,000 worth of stakes — The fastest two-year-old in America. 



HIGH CLASS H\CI\<. PROSPECTS. 

Mil) 2:(»7 :, 4, bay male by Pro ligal. sire 
of John Nolan 2:08 and sire dam of 
Gen. Watts (3) 2:06%. 

Wenja 2:is'/i. bay mare by Zolock 
2:05%, dam Naulahka 2:14. dam of 
3. by Nutford 2:15. 

Uoccr Knight 2:l.'l-%. bay gelding by 
Knight, dam by Messenger Almont. 

Modicum 2:KI. bay mare by Ceo. Ayers. 

CHAS DE RYDER CONSIGNS. 

Lilly S., foaled 1896. by Direct 2:05%. 
dam Lilly Stanley 2:17%, dam of 3 
in list, by Wbippb ton. In foal to 
Star Pointer. 



Tacona. foaled ls:o;. by Birchwood 2:15, 
dam Frances Medium, dam of 6, by 
Happy Medium. 

Hay Moon, foaled 1904, bv Barondale 
2:11%, dam Idlemay 2:27% by 
Electioneer. 

Hrown mare, foaled 1902. by Cupid 
2:18, brother to Sidney Dillon, dam 
Countess by McKinney. In foal to 
Star Pointer. 

Vearllng Uly by Star Pointer, da in 
brown mare by Cupid as above. 

Black yearling ealt by Alma b o 2:22%, 
dam Tacona as above. 

King Dinger, handsome brown stallion 
by Zombro 2:11. dam by Diablo 
2:09%, second dam the great brood 
mare Lilly Langtry, by Nephew. 



See page •">, this issue, lor horse- consigned by Cuieollo Bros., Thofi Honan. S. 
W right, .1. E. Forster, Joost Bros., <>. ('. Henboy and others. 

Catalogues out March 1st. Xo consignments received after February 24th. 



FRED H. CHASE G CO., 



478 Valencia St., San Francisco 



The Stallion Number 

—OF THE — 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 27, '09 

It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be 
replete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive cir- 
culation throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stal- 
lion announcements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., 
of all the best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can 
decide on what stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, new. 
and articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a 
work of reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the 
Horsemen, Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field 
Sports, it will be particularly valuable. 

As was shown by the popularity and success of our stallion issue last Feb- 
ruary, a Christmas issue is too early for stallion announcements, as many 
owners are not ready ta say at that time where their horses will stand. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should havo 
photographs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A spe- 
cially low price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it 
within the reach of all. Write for price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



THE SQUA RE DEA L f or the ROUND DOLLAR 

American Horse Breeder 
Futurity sixth renewal 



$1.00 

To Nominate 




$3.00 

Second Payment 



Open to mares bred in l'.tOS for foals of l!K)i> 
$6,000 to :; -year-old trotters . $4,000 to winner 

3,000 to 3-year old pacers . 2,000 to winner 

2,000 to 2-year-old trotters . . 1,300 to winner 

700 to Nominators of Dams id' .Money Winners 

*l .00 to nominate a mare, second payment $3.00 November 1 (33 per cent 
cheaper than similar payments in any other Futurity), $6.00 May 1, 1!I10. 
No more payments until year of race. 

Entries close March 15 

And will be published each week in the "American Horse Breeder" as they 
are received up to the date of closing 

No Substitution. 



AMERICAN HORSE BREEDER, 



169 High Street, Boston 



New Edition of John Splan's Book 



tt 



Life With the Trotter 



Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With thu Trotter gives us a clear insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Dreeder and Sportsman I . O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific Bldg., Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



Saturday, February 6, 1909.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363, 365 and 366 PACIFIC BUILDING. 

Corner Market and Fourth Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco 
Postoffice. 



Terms — One Tear $3; Six Months $1.75; Three Months %1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or 
registered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



AS THE CONSIGNMENTS come in day by day for 
the Second Annual Sale at Pleasanton, it is very plain 
to be seen that the greatest aggregation of grandly 
bred mares, stallions, colts and fillies ever brought 
together for a sale in California will be gathered at 
Pleasanton on the week of the sale, and as the 
bees are always where the honey is, it is reasonable 
to predict that the greatest crowd of harness horse 
admirers ever gathered together in one town, will 
be there to bid on the horses they like. The har- 
ness horse is growing in popularity every day, and 
those who want to buy should buy now as prices are 
on the rise to a moral certainty. There has never 
been an opportunity like this one for buyers to get 
what they wanted. The Nutwood Stock Farm con- 
signment is beyond all question the best bred sixty 
that ever were consigned to a sale on this Coast from 
one farm, and as they go to the highest bidders with- 
out reserve, the buyers will get them at their own 
prices. The second day will also have a very sen- 
sational lot of horses to be sold. The two-year-old 
Lottie Lynwood, full sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05%, is 
entered in more rich stakes for two and three-year- 
olds than any colt or filly ever put up at auction. 
She is in all the big Eastern stakes and in all the 
Pacific Coast stakes beside. Chas. DeRyder sends 
ten of as well bred mares and colts as can be found 
recorded in the Trotting Register. Ted Hayes sends 
some record horses that can win money in free for 
all races. Cuicello Bros., Thos. Ronan, S. B. Wright, 
the breeder of Sonoma Girl 2: 05 14 and Charley 
Belden 2:08V 2 . J. E. Forster, O. C. Benbow, Joost 
Bros, and several others have made consignments 
of high class young horses. Pleasanton will he a 
lively town the week of this sale, and the Chamber 
of Comerce is already making arrangements to en- 
tertain the people and show them the beautiful Liver- 
more Valley. Pleasanton will be indeed "the horse 
centre'' on March 25th, 26th and 27th. 

o 

THE BREEDING of Little Sally and Mad Sally. 
Ihird and fourth dams, respectively, of Velox 2:0914 
and Kid Wilkes (matinee trot'ing record 2:10%) are 
not known definitely, and probably never will be. 
Our Los Angeles correspondent, Mr. William I,, 
.lames, interview the former owner of Mad Sally, Mr. 
C. A. Durfee, last week, and the latter states that, 
while Mad Sally was called an Oregon Lummox 
mare, her breeding was not known, and that Little 
Sally was Mad Sally's foal "by a big black s'allion 
that was said to be a son of Norfolk, but he never 
believed it for a minute." So the known breeding 
of the. dam of Velox is as follows: Anne Bolevn by 
Balboa, thoroughbred son of Norfolk, second dam 
Grey Annie by Romero 2005, third dam Little Sally 
by a black stallion, and fourth dam Mad Sally, a fast 
quarter mare whose pedigree is unknown. 

o 

TROTTING BRED HORSES are selling for good 
prices at all the auctions, and this in face of the 
fact that the times are hard and money close. But 
very meagre reports have come by telegraph from the 
Midwinter Sale which the Fasig-Tipton Company 
began at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday of 
this week, but the fact that 25 horses were sold the 
first day for a total of $55,365, an average of over 
$400 to the horse shows the demand is very heavy. 
As the highest price paid for any one horse was 
$3,500 for the two-year old brown colt. Royal Hall, 
by Walnut Hall 2:08%, dam Fereno 2:05'/ 2 by Moko. 
the average obtained is therefore more creditable. 
The figures of the Old Glory, the Midwinter and the 
Chicago and Indianapolis sales are positive proof 



that trotting bred stock is in demand at good prices 
in the East, and the sales which Fred H. Chase & 
Company have held in California during the pas', six 
months show that the market on this Coast is fully 
as good, breeding of stock considered. The legis- 
lation against gambling has not injured but has 
helped the breeding and racing of trotters and pacers, 
as these horses are not gambling machines by any 
means, but are pleasure and business horses that 
have a real and not a chance value. Those who in- 
vest in the best bred trotting and pacing stock now, 
will be wise, as prices are certain to rise during 
the next few years to a moral certainty. 

o 

THE BILL PROHIBITING BETTING on races 
passed the California Senate on Thursday by a vote 
of 33 to 7, and now goes to the Governor, who has al 
ready signified his intention to sign it and thus make 
it the law of the State. There was such an over- 
whelming sentiment among the people of the entire 
State in favor of this measure, and such a universal 
demand for its passage, that but very few of the 
legislators had the temerity to vote or even raise 
their voices in opposition to the bill. And yet ther'> 
are probably not a half-dozen in the entire legislative" 
body who do not enjoy horse races, or who consider 
it any harm for one person to wager with another 
on 'ho result of a contest. The fight that has been 
waged, against bookmaking and poolselling has sim- 
ply been a fight against the professional gamblers who 
have ruined and brought into disrepute every sport 
of which they have managed to secure control. While 
avast majority of the people saw no harm in the once- 
honored custom of holding race meetings for a week 
at a time, once or twice a year, at the county fairs 
and elsewhere, and for many years failed to realize 
that, six or seven months of racing was an evil, they 
have finally awoke to the fact that the running of 
thoroughbreds as conducted in this State from 
November to May has become simply a subterfuge 
for a seven-months' gambling carnival which has de- 
bauched the young manhood and womanhood of Cali- 
fornia to a most alarming degree. Having had their 
eyes opened to this fact, it did not take long for the 
people to rise and demand of their representatives in 
the Legislature the passage of a law that would put 
a stop to the evil, and as in all such cases, the people 
have won, and won easily. The passage and en- 
forcement ol this new law will not work any hardship 
on any legitimate industry in California. 

WHAT A COLT NEEDS. 



There is more than feed needed to grow a colt. 
He needs comfortable quarters and they should be 
roomy, that he may have room to exercise on stormy 
days. On pleasant days he should have a yard or 
paddock to take out of doors exercise in. Now, 
about the feed, I would advise that alfalfa being fed 
but once per day and that at noon in a quantity that 
he would eat up clean in about forty minutes. Morn- 
ing and night feed the mixed hay in quantity that 
he will eat clean in not to exceed an hour. The grain 
feed I would make of oats and wheat bran, mix them 
equally by weight, and feed him a pound of the mix- 
ture every twenty-four hours in three feeds to every 
one hundred pounds weight of colt. Thus if your colt 
weighs now three hundred pounds he should have 
three pounds of feed a day, a pound at each meal, 
morning, noon and night, and in each feed I would 
place a teaspoonful of seasoning made by mixing in 
two pounds of ground flaxseed, four ounces of gen- 
tain, five ounces of ginger, six ounces nitrate of pot- 
ash, three ounces of powdered charcoal, one pound 
of salt and three ounces of powdered anise seed. Mix 
well together. Some will object to this by saying I 
am medicating the colt. I am not, I am simply sup- 
plying what he would find in a pasture field in weeds 
and the licking of old mother earth. It is simply 
seasoning for the food, and just, as useful to the ani- 
mal as the salt, pepper and spice you eat in your food 
to make it palatable. 

o 

SHOWS AND HORSE BREEDING. 

The improvement in all classes of live stock, but 
especially horses, during even the last ten or twelve 
years, has been one of the most striking features of 
the times; and there is no doubt that much of this 
is due to the encouragement afforded by the show 
system. This has helped to fix a high Standard 
and ideal; has stimulated public interest and edu- 
cated public opinion; has drawn attention to and 
popularized the breeds; has attracted foreign buyers, 
has engendered keen competition; and has caused 
large sums of money to be expended for the encour- 
agement and improvement of the animal. 

It is true enough that the present system of horse 
shows has its detractors. A very common criticism 
is that show horses are of little use in alter life, 
or when their show career ends, and that their value 
and influence too often ceases with the show. But 
surely this is a crude and narrow view of the case. 
Our shows are, after all schools wherein to educate 
public opinion ; they fix a type and their supporters 



rightly maintain that, given certain points and per- 
fections, a certain stamp of horses should be ca- 
pable of performing certain functions and no doubt 
in most cases this belief is justified. 

Another objection one frequently meets with is 
the unhealthy and unnatural forcing which show 
animals so often receive to their ultimate detriment. 
But this again is surely more a matter for the owner, 
who, as a rule, may be trusted to treat his live stock 
in the wisest way. Perhaps a still more frequent ob- 
jection heard is that the prizes of the show ring go 
with far too great regularity to a small and select 
band of exhibitors, who are somewhat unjustly 
termed "professional showers." These and such 
like objections are, however, very small matters to 
comparison with the undoubted good these national 
show's and societies have accomplished throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. If in the past 
our shows and societies have done much to encour- 
age and promote horse breeding, what shall be said 
of the future? Their success brings with a three- 
fold responsibility, viz: (1) To the nation, (2) to 
the breed itself, (3) to their show patron. 

Let us consider the subject under these heads: 
1 1 ) Their responsibility to the nation. The blood 
stock of this country is universally acknowledged to 
be as good as any in the world. To set an ideal 
standard of excellence, to keep such breeds up to 
their present high perfection, and to safeguard the 
purity and soundness of our breeding stock is surely 
a duty of national importance, and one which our 
great shows and breed societies are universally car- 
rying out. 

(2) The responsibility to , the breed itself. To 
keep these breeds pure, to stimulate healthy rivalry, 
and to encourage, and. if possible, further improve the 
type, is surely a great national trust which is being 
wisely recognized by our principal shows and socie- 
ties. 

(3) And, lastly, their responsibility to their patrons. 
This is being provided for by the aid of stud books, 
general legislation, and monetary grants. Shows, by 
affording our friends and cousins from across the 
seas opportunity to see and study the best specimens 
of our various breeds, at the same time provide 
a lucrative market for the benefit of the breeders. — 
Rider and Driver. 

o 

Seldom, if ever, says American Horse Breeder, 
has there been a closer contest for the honor of 
having sired the greatest number of new standard 
performers of the season than that between Bin- 
gen 2:06^4 and Peter the Great 2:07%. When 
the Christmas Breeder was issued it looked from 
this office as though it was a dead heat between 
Bingen 2:06% and Peter the Great 2:07%, each of 
which was credited with 17 new standard performers. 

Some of the turf papers then credited Peter the 
Great with 18 new performers, but that was a 
mistake for they included among his new performers 
Peter Wood 2:19*4 that made a record of 2:29% in 
1907, and is so credited in the Year Book for 1907. 

It seems that when the Christmas turf papers were 
published the returns were not all in. A letter from 
Secretary J. E. Mittinger states that Betty Bingen 
by Bingen 2:06%, trotted to a record of 2:29% at, 
Youngwood, Pa., the past season, and an accom- 
panying letter from Secretary Gocher, of the Na- 
tional Trotting Association, states that he finds 
upon referring to the official report that this per- 
formance is duly entered. This makes 18 new per- 
formers for Bingen during the past season and 17 
for Peter the Great 2:07%. Bingen wins by an 
eyelash, but Peter the Great put up a stiff fight 
and it will not be surprising if he should get the 
decision over Bingen the coming season. Owing 
to the fact that Bingen 2:06% and Peter the Great 
2:07% were at one time stable companions at 
Forbes Farm, this race for honors between them is 
of especial interest to New England horsemen. 
o 

W. R. Letcher, who died at Macon, Ga., recently, 
was the man who brought out Harry Willies 2:13M>, 
the fastest trotter sired by George Wilkes, and, in 
his day, the sensational trotter of the Grand Circuit. 
Mr. Letcher bought Harry Wilkes from his breeder 
In Speedville, Ky., when he was a two-year-old, pay- 
ing $500 for him. He was used In the stud for a 
couple of years, but being little more than a pony 
in size he was gelded and by that action a great sire 
was lost to the world, for from the less than 15 foals 
that he sired nine either took standard records or 
produced or sired standard performers. Mr. Letcher 
took Harry Wilkes to the races when he was six 
years old and he took a record of 2:23% that season. 
The next spring, after showing remarkably fast in 
his work, the horse was sold by Mr. Letcher to the 
late W. C. France for $6,000. Mr. Letcher also owned 
Bud Crooke 2:15%, a noted pacing son of George 
Wilkes; Letcher 2:18%, by Director; Emperor 
Wilkes 2:30%, by George Wilkes; Cadenza, the great 
grandam of Spanish Queen 2:07, and other trotters 
and progenitors of trotters of note. For the last few 
years Mr. Letcher had been secretary of the Ken- 
tucky Racing Association of Kentucky, having aban- 
doned the breeding business entirely. 

o 

One hundred and twenty-five horses were sold up 
to Wednesday evening at the Fasig-Tipton Mid- 
winter Sale at Madison Square Garden, New York. 
The following brought $1,000 or more: Royal Hall, 
(trotter) brown colt, two year-old by Walnut Hall 
Fereno, $3,500; Harvest Girl (trotter), bay filly, two- 
year-old by Walnut I lall-Notelet , $1,600; Native Belle 
(trotter), bay filly, two-year-old, by Moko-Yellow 
Belle, $2,275; Tenara (trotter), bay filly, two-year-old. 
by Moko-Terentia. $1,700; Lentala (trotter), bay 
filly, two-year-old by Nuthall-Sister Min, $2,250. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February G, 1900. 



IN SONOMA COUNTY. § 



§ (By C. C. Crippen.) « 

At the Santa Rosa Stock Farm, the birthplace of 
the world's champion trotter. Lou Dillon 1:58%, of 
her wonderful sire Sidney Dillon (sire of four trot- 
ters whose records average 2:05%), of Ruth Dillon 
2:06% (champion four-year-old trotting filly h. of 
Dolly Dillon 2:06%, Stanley Dillon 2:07%, Carlokin 
2:08%, Inferlotta, p. 2:04%, Custer, p, 2:05% and 
others, are still to be found a lot of the very best bred 
stallions, mares and youngsters on any place west 
of the Rockies. 

Guy Dillon 39568, trotting trial 2:19% (and I saw 
him do it last October), half in 1:06. quarter in .31%, 
by Sidney Dillon, dam By Guy (dam of Sophy Dil- 
lon trial 2:13%, trotting. Martha Dillon (4) trial 
2:14 trotting, second dam the $10,000 By By (dam 
of Rapidan Dillon, trial 2:10% trotting, and five oth- 
ers with trials better than 2:25), by Nutwood 2:18%, 
third dam Rapidan (dam of three in 2:30), by Die 
tator 113, is the premium stallion and he is certainly 
well enough bred to be at the head of any stock farm. 
As an individual he is as good as his breeding, and 
is a pure gaited trotter, with every right to beat 
2:10. 

California Dillon (3) 2:18%. three-year-old trial 
last August of 2:13%, is also a grandly bred son of 
Sidney Dillon. His first dam is Caritone by Antone 
30842 (son of Dexter Prince and Grace B., by Stani- 
boul 2:07%), second dam Biscara (dam of eight in 
2:30), by Director 2:17, third dam Bicari (dam of 
seven in 2:30), by Harold (sire of Maud S. 2:08%). 
This fellow is a real, pure gaited pacer, that wears 
nothing but the harness. He is a beautiful chestnut, 
that looks like a 2:00 side wheeler to me. 

Major Dillon 39588, another son of Sidney Dillon, 
out of Maud Fowler 2:21% (dam of the great Sonoma 
Girl 2:05%, Sonoma May 2:15%, Sonoma Queen (3) 
2:26, Sonoma Boy 2:20), next dam Eveline (dam of 
eight with records and trials better than 2:25), by 
Nutwood 600. This is a grand looking chestnut 
stallion that ought to make a great sire. 

Sky Pointer, Jr., is a bay stallion with a trial of 
2:12 pacing; sired by Sky Pointer, full brother to 
Star Pointer 1:59%, dam Juliet D. 2:13% (dam of 
Irish 2:08%), by McKinney 2:11%. 

This farm enjoys the distinction of being the only 
breeding establishment on the Coast that owns three 
dams of better than 2:10 trotters, viz: 

Carlotta Wilkes, by Charley Wilkes 2:21%, dam 
Aspasia (dam of four in 2:30), by Alcantar 2:27. 
This mare is the dam of Carlokin 2:08%, Inferlotta, 
p, 2:04% and Mary Dillon, p, trial 2:08% and two 
others in 2:30. 

Russie Russell by Bay Rose 2:20%, is the dam of 
Ruth Dillon 2:06%, champion four-year-old trotter. 

Juanita Skinner (dam of Charley Belden 2:08%) by 
Silas Skinner 2:07. 

Among the great broodmares at the farm are the 
following: 

By Guv (dam of three with trials in 1908 better 
than 2:20), by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, dam By By by 
Nutwood 2:18%; Adioo (dam of Adioo Dillon (2) 
2:24, trial (2) 2:16%. Harry Dillon (3) 2:27, (3) 
trial 2:15% and Humboldt Dillon, trial 2:18), full 
sister to By Guy; By By by Nutwood 600; Center 
Gu> In McKinney, dam By Guy, by By Guy Wilkes; 
Carrinio C, by McKinney, dam Adioo by Guy Wilkes; 
Caratina, by McKinney, dam By By hy Nutwood 600; 
Caritone (dam of California Dillon, p, (3) 2:18%, 
trial 2:13%, Dr. Wm. S. Jennings, p, second in his 
only race in 2:14), by Antone 30842, dam Biscari 
(dam of eight in 2:30), by Director 2:17, second 
dam Bicari (dam of seven in 2:30), by Harold; 
Stambouletta 2:27, by Stamboul 2:07%, dam Bis- 
cari by Director: Mildred Russell by L. W. Russell, 
dam Lou Milton (dam of Lou Dillon 1:58% and three 
others in 2:30), by Milton Medium. 

There are several other well bred mares and 
nearly all are in foal to the grand young stallion 
Guy Dillon. Old By By was bred to California Dillon 
and is safely in foal. Mr. Turner has a choice lot of 
one and two-year-olds out of these richly bred dams 
by Guy Dillon and Major Dillon. There is an old 
saying that "there are just as good fish in the sea 
as were ever caught." It is more than likely that 
there are just as good prospects on this farm today 
as there ever were. The blood of great sires and 
great dams flows in the veins of every thing on the 
place; the blood of Lou Dillon and Sweet Marie is 
mingled together there. 



Al McDonald has eight head at the track. Two of 
them are by the world's champion trotting stallion, 
Cresceus 2:02%. One is a three-year-old bay colt, 
dam Silpan, by Silverbow 2:16, next dam Kitty Fox 
by Pancoast 2:21%. Al worked him about three 
months in his two-year-old form and drove him a 
mile in 2:29%. He is a very strong made colt, with 
great bone and bears a striking resemblance to his 
famous sire in every thing except color. As his 
sire and the sire of his dam were both by Robert 
McGregor 2:17, he is therefore inbred to the monarch 
of the home stretch and ought to make a dead game 
race horse. The other is a four-year-old full sister 
to the colt and although she has had but little work 
is equally as promising. 

Nordwell is a six-year-old pacing stallion by De- 
monio 2:11 (sire of Mona Wilkes 2:03%), dam by 
Gossiper 2:14%, that, like all the get of Diablo's 
brother is very fast, and handsome besides. 



A five-year-old gelding trotter hy Washington 
McKinney is said to have shown a mile in 2:22. 

A two-year-old filly by Wayland W. 2:12%, dam 
Cecil 2:25 by Robin 2:22%, and a three-year-old pac- 
ing gelding by same sire look like good prospects. 

A very stout, rugged-looking yearling colt by Zo- 
lock 2:05%, dam (full sister to Welcome Mc. 2:07%), 
by McKinney. Al says this fellow is a sure trotter. 

Last as well as least in this string is The Grafter, 
yearling colt by the sire of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, out 
of Nellie Fairmont, dam of Zambra 2:16%, world's 
champion five-mile-trotter. Mr. McDonald recently 
purchased this colt and if he does his name justice 
will get the money sure. 



W. C. Helman has the game old race horse and 
sire Wayland W. 2:12%, looking like a colt. He also 
has a grand three-year-old colt in Mendo McKinney 
by Mendocino 2:19% Isire of Monte Carlo 2:07)4, 
Idolita 2:09%, Mendolita, p, 2:07% and others), first 
dam Molly McNeta by McKinney, second dam by 
Antevolo 2:19%, third dam by Almont 33. This is 
a large and handsome bay colt that looks and acts 
like a trotter. A yearling filly by Wayland W. dam, 
full sister to Charley Belden 2:08% and a few mares 
to be bred to Wayland W., are all Mr. Helman has 
at the track. 



At Mr. S. B. Wright's farm I saw the great old 
broodmare Maud Fowler 2:21% (dam of Sonoma Girl, 
2:05%, Sonoma May 2:15%, Sonoma Boy 2:20 and 
Sonoma Queen (3) 2:26). This famous daughter of 
Anteeo carries her years lightly and looks good to 
produce several more trotters. Her dam, the great 
Evelyn (dam of Ole 2:10% and nine that have beaten 
2:30), by Nutwood 2:18%, was grazing in a pad- 
dock, but her days of maternity are over and she is 
quietly waiting the call to the spirit realm of flying 
steeds across the raging river. 

Sonoma Queen (3) 2:26 raised a foal last year by 
Wayland W. 2:12%, but was not bred again. Mr. 
Wright contemplates breeding her to Bon Voyage. 
The result of this mating should be very satisfactory, 
as Sonoma Queen has two minute trotting speed her- 
self, having shown eighths in 15 seconds. She is a 
handsome and well made young mare, not quite as 
tall as her famous sister, but with a little more 
breadth. 

Olive Dillon is a very handsome chestnut mare by 
Sidney Dillon out of Maud Fowler. Al McDonald 
worked her a while last fall and drove her a mile 
in 2:22 on a trot. Mr. Wright intends her for a 
broodmare and believes Kinney Lou 2:07% to be a 
desirable cross for her. She is a little high strung 
and a little leggy, while Budd Doble's horse never 
gets excited and is closer to the ground. 

Hattie Fowler by Robin 2:22%, is another half- 
sister to Sonoma Girl and is in foal to Lynwood W. 
(2) 2:20%, the sire of that great trotter. 

A good looking brown mare, sister to Charley Bel- 
den 2:08%, is in foal to Washington McKinney. 

Mr. Wright's son, Winfield, owns a nice five-year- 
old mare by Lynwood W>, dam Hattie Fowler by 
Robin 2:22%, next dam Maud Fowler 2:21%, that 
can show a lot of trot, but was never trained. 

There was a likely looking three-year-old colt by 
Lynwood W., dam Maud P. (3) 2:26 by Idaho Patchen 
and several other well bred young colts and fillies, 
but the one that filled my eye completely, to the 
exclusion of every thing else was an exceedingly 
handsome and perfectly made yearling colt, full 
brother to the great trotter Sonoma Girl 2:05%. He 
is a chestnut with star, right hind ankle white, and 
a little white on right front coronet. I am not a 
good hand to describe a horse or colt minutely but 
to my mind this colt is faultless and 1 would very 
much liked to have brought him away with me. If 
I had him where I could look at him all the while 
I don't think I would do anything else. Perhaps if 
he was not a full brother to the fastest trotter now 
in training and one that I knew intimately before she 
became famous, I would not like him so well. 

If Mr. Wright had told me that, this colt was 
"sired by a Hambletonian horse that used to stand 
up near Sacramento called Hardtimes. that was a fast 
trotter, and his dam a fast mare by a son of Gen. 
Taylor, second dam by Easton's Black Hawk and third 
dam a full blooded Morgan mare that was brought 
across the plains in the early sixties," perhaps he 
wouldn't have looked so good to me. 

In the spring there will be another full brother or 
sister to Lottie Crabtree's fast trotter and Mr. Pound- 
er's fast two-year-old Lottie Lynwood, as Maud Fow- 
ler is now heavy in foal to Lynwood W. 



Mr. F. J. Yandle has three good ones at his place 
in Santa Rosa that are being jogged and looked after 
by Tom Holmes. First is the handsome and game 
pacer, Tom Murphy 2:09%, that started seven times 
in 1908, was three times first; twice second and twice 
fourth. He is stouter than ever before, his legs are 
as clean as a whistle, and he should be a good pros- 
pect for the 2:10 classes on the Coast next season. 

Laurel Leaf is a fast green trotting mare that has 
worked in 2:12 and a half in 1:03 by Stam B. 2:11%, 
dam Laurel 2:13% by Nephew, next dam Laura C. 
2:29% by Electioneer 125, next dam thoroughbred 
by Imp. Buckden. I broke Laurel 2:13% at Palo 
Alto. She was so promising that Chas. Marvin pro- 
moted her to his class where he trained her with the 
object, of beating the two-year-old record of 2:18, 
held by Sunol. Laurel did not lack speed, but she 
was of too delicate constitution and too nervous 
temperament for a record breaking two-year-old. 
Years afterwards in Tom Keating's hands she won 
a few races and at Woodland uset the talent and took 
her record. She could trot halves in a minute and 
quarters at a much faster clip. Laurel has another 



daughter in the Yandle stable in the handsome brown 
mare Kittie Yandle by Suomi son of Zombro and 
Belle Medium 2:20, (dam of Stam B. 2:11%, etc.) 
This mare is very strong and rugged, not. a bit like 
her dam, a good gaited trotter and a very promising 
one. 



Dr. J. J. Summerfleld is the owner of a handsome 
and well bred son of Sidney Dillon in Lord Dillon 
(two-year-old trial 2:28), dam Roblet 2:12( dam of 
Bonalet (3) 2:09%), by Robin 2:22%, next dam the 
great old Evelyn (dam of Ole 2:10%, etc.), by Nut- 
wood 600. He also owns the dark chestnut stallion 
Don Sonoma by Valotta (son of Geo. Norval and 
Carlotta Wilkes, dam of Carlokin 2:08%, etc.), and 
a two-year-old chestnut colt that is handicapped by 
the name of Squeedunck, sired by Cupid 2:18, dam 
Czarina 2:13% by Dexter Prince. The Doctor also 
owns a number of broodmares, among them being 
Rose McKinney, sixteen-year-old record 2:28 (dam 
of Almaden (2) 2:22%, Rose Lecco, three vear-old 
trial, 2:23 by McKinney), Alex B. 2:22% (dam of 
Alsandra 2:12), by Nutwood Wilkes. Zarina 2:13% 
and mares by Chas. Derby and Lynwood W. 



In 1908 Ed. Lafferty was training at the Santa 
Rosa Stock Farm and wrote me that there was a 
horse at that place that was a wonderful trotter; he 
had timed him a quarter in 29% seconds. Later in 
the season I was at Santa Rosa and saw the horse 
referred to. It was Lynwood W. Geo. Campion 
owned him and was peddling him all over that part 
of the country, breeding him to all and any mares 
he could get, and sometimes drove him 40 miles 
a day. Santa Rosa race track was his headquarters 
and when there he worked the sire of Sonoma Girl 
on the track. It was there that Ed. saw him trot a 
quarter in 29% seconds, and it was there that I 
saw him for the first time and timed him a quarter 
one day in 31 seconds hitched to a heavy road cart. 
That was the year he got Sonoma Girl and Charley 
Belden. I had never seen him since till last week. 
Of course eleven years has made some change in the 
appearance of Lynwood W. He is now a big, fat 
stud and don't look much like trotting a two min- 
ute gait, but he has sired two-minute speed and 
will doubtless beget some more of the same kind. 

Mr. Carlton showed me a two-year-old seal brown 
colt by the old horse out of Mirabel, by Owyhee 
2:11, next dam Inex (dam of Our Jack 2:13%, etc.). 
by Sweepstakes, son of Hambletonian 10. A hand- 
somer, better made or better developed two-year- 
old would be hard to find. If he fails to make a trot- 
ter some one will be to blame. 



My old friend Mart Rollins who developed and 
owned that great trotter Charley Belden 2:08%, has 
another good thing in a young trotting mare by 
Lynwood W., dam by Montana Wilkes, son of Red 
Wilkes. This mare has had but four months' work 
and has been a mile in 2:19%, although never 
bitched to anything but a Toomey road cart. I timed 
her a quarter last October in 32% seconds. She is a 
good headed and good gaited trotter and much faster 
than Charley Belden was with same amount of work. 
Here is a good prospect for someone who wants a 
high-class trotter. 



At Petaluma John Grimes has a splendid young 
son of the great McKinney in McMyrtle, dam Myrtle- 
dale by Iran Alto 2:12%, next dam Nettie Nutwood 
(dam of Hillside 2:15, and grandam of Sterling 
McKinney 2:06%) by Nutwood 600. This is a good 
looking bay horse 15.2% hands, and a trotter. He is 
seven years old. was trained three months in 1907 
over the Santa Rosa track and showed a mile in 
2:18%. He resembles Iran Alto, the sire of his dam, 
in looks and gait, more than he does McKinney. 
Everyone who has seen him work has a good word 
for him and considers him the making of a very fast 
horse if given an opportunity. Mr. Grimes has a 
si able full of horses and colts, several of them being 
young things by McMyrtle. These are all good look- 
ers and show a lot of trot. They are out of well 
brad dams by Gossiper 2:14%. Secretary (son of 
Director 2:17) and Eclectic, full brother to ArlOO 
2:07%. He also owns several mares in foal to Mc- 
Myrtle. A three-year-old bay colt, dam by Gossiper, 
and a two-year-old, dam by Gossiper. next dam by 
Guy Wilkes, are two as good lookers and good pros- 
pects as can be seen anywhere. Mr. Grimes also has 
an eight year-old horse by Secretary, dam by Til toil 
Almont, that has trotted a mile in 2:17, and a couple 
of big draft studs that are good stock horses. 



John Offutt owns a four-vear old son of Kinney Lou 
2:07%, dam Menlo Belle 2:28%, by Menlo 2:21%. 
son of Nutwood 2:18%, that has not only good looks, 
but size and substance, and is also a trotter. With 
just three months' work as a three-year-old he 
stepped a mile in 2:30. His owner will breed him 
to a few mares in the spring and later in the season 
give him some more training. Mr. Offutt owns Grace 
McKinney 2:14%, by McKinney, dam by Dexter 
Prince, and quite a number of well bred fillies and 
mares by Dictatus 2:17, Seymour Wilkes 2:08%, 
Daedalion 2:08%, Meridian 2:12%, Wayland W. 
2:12% and Gossiper 2:14%, and will breed them to 
his young son of Kinney Lou and Menlo Bell. 
o 

If Readville emerges successfully from its present 
financial entanglements — and every indication points 
that way — a year hence will find the track in the 
Grand Circuit company, with just as attractive a pro- 
gram of stakes and early-closing events as is offered 
by any city in the circuit. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, February 6, 1909 ] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



MORE GOOD ONES FOR THE SALE. 



Fred H. Chase <fe Co. have received the following 
additional consignments to the Second Annual Pleas- 
anton Sale which is to be held March 25th, 26th and 
27th. 

Cuicello Bros, consign a three-> tar old t oiling 
gelding by Almaden (2) 2:22%, dam llessie D. by 
McKinney, second dan Stemwinder, the dam ot Di- 
rectum 2:05%; a five-year-old pacing filly by Cupid 
2: IS. out of a mare by Aptos Wilkes; a four-year-old 
stallion by Owynex 2:22%, dam Atherlue, dam of 
the great Copa de Oro 2:03% and Stal^ne 2 2 ~ %. 
With three months' work last fall this coit trvtted a 
mile in 2:24% with the last quarter in 3>% seconds, 
and is the making of a high class trotter su.d is a 
grandly ored stallion. Cuicello Bros, consign three 
others to be mentioned later. 

Thos. lionan, proprietor of the Plcasauton truck 
setids three highly bred mares of his own breeding 
as follows: Antrilla, four-years-old by Alexis, dam 
by Antrim; Antoinette, matinee record 2:21, trial 2:18 
by Antrim, dam by Meredith; Lizzie C, four-yeais- 
old by Alexis, dam by Antrim. These are all nice 
mares, well broken and show speed. 

J. E. Forster, Mayfield, sends the bay stallion Chas. 
Sumner, foaled 1903, trotter, trial 2:27 by St. Nich- 
olas, son of Sidney, do.m by Daly 2:15, second dam by 
Milton Medium, sire dam of Lou Dillon 1:58%. This 
is a very handsome horse over 16 hands and weighs 
1,250 pounds, has fine style and is good gaited. Will 
be in Jack Phippen's stable from March 1st to day 
of sale. 

S. B. Wright, of Santa Rosa, breeder of Sonoma 
Girl 2:05% and Charley Belden 2:08%, consigns Belle 
W. the dam of Bolivar 2:00%, the fastest pacer bred 
in California. She is in foal to Lynwood W., sire 
of Sonoma Girl and Charley Belden. He also con- 
signs Midget by Welcome 2:10%, a bay two-year-eld 
colt by Lynwood W., dam Maud P. by Idaho Patchen, 
and a yearling bay colt by Wayland W. 2:12%, out 
of Hattie Fowler, a half sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05% 
by Robin. 

Joost Bros., Martinez, consign the handsome three- 
year-old stud colt Bonway 48182, by Bonnie Direct 
2:05%, dam Presumption by Steinway. This is a 
fine looker and a good prospect. He is fully paid up 
in the Breeders Futurity for this year. 

O. C. Denboy consigns Ollie B., a fine seven-year- 
old mare by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by Long Branch. 
Don t let any Nutwood Wilkes mares get past you 
if you want a brood mare. 

Several other owners and breeders are in corres- 
pondence with Chase & Co. in regard to consigning 
horses to this sale and there is no doubt but it will 
outclass every sale heretofore held in the State. 
The Nutwood Stock Farm consignment will be sold 
on the first day, March 25. The catalogues will be 
out March 1st, so consignments must all be sent in 
before that time. This catalogue will be the most 
complete ever gotten out by this well known auction 
firm. Everything points to a larger number of buyers 
being present than have ever attended a sale in Cali- 
fornia. 

o 

SECRETARY GOCHER LOSES HIS TROTTER 



Secretary W. H. Cocher. of the National Trotting 
Association writes from Hartford: 

"Friday afternoon while being jogged Senator L. 
made a little misstep which resulted in a compound 
fracture of the right pastern. As there is no cure for 
injuries of that character, an officer of the humane 
society put him out of his misery. 

"As he passes I wish to state that he was without 
exception the cleverest, most fearless ana best man- 
nered road horse I ever drove a line over. When Mr. 
Shepard sold him in New York in February, 1907. he 
stated that he was an up-headed, sweetgaited, gallant 
horse, full of ambition and endowed with an intelli- 
gence which makes him an idea' gentleman's road 
horse. All of this is true. 

"As you are aware, he was bred by the late B. J. 
Tracy, of Lexington, Ky., and foaled in 1894. He was 
sired by West Cloud, a half brother of Black Cloud 
2:17%, dam Ellrida by Hldridge, son of Edward Ever- 
ett, grandam Maud Macey 2:27%, dam of Joe Hooker. 
James Golden drove him to a race record of 2:12. Mr. 
Shepard gave him a pole record with Boralma of 
2:21% and he also made a matinee record to wagon 
of 2:09%. 

"In addition to this, he also won the speedway 
championship of the New York speedway to sleigh 
in 1907, and when I bought him from Percy Smith 
he also gave me the silver cup which was presented 
to him lor that performance." 

Senator L. was trained and developed by Tom Bell- 
inger, the Portland, Ind., trainer and was started in 
a number of races through Ohio, and was by him sold 
to Mr. John Shepard of Boston. 

o 

Ed Geers celebrated his fifty-eighth birthday last, 
month. They say he don't look a doggoned day older 
than he did ten years ago. 



Millard Sanders is confident that Prince Axworthy 
in V. L. Shuler's stable is another Jack Axworthy. 
Sanders ought to know, as he made Jack Axworthy 
and started the Axworthy boom with that great colt. 



It was not My Star, but Gentry's Star, that met 
with an accident in Boston lately and had to be 
destroyed. My Star is owned by Frank Hickey, of 
Worcester, Mass., arid is in good condition. 



AT SAN MATEO. 



Laurel Creek Stock Farm, San Mateo, K. O. Grady 
proprietor, is the home of a lot of well bred ones 
and is the best equipped place for taking care of all 
kinds of horse stock anywhere near San Francisco. 
Mr. O'Qrady makes a specialty of taking care of out- 
side stock as well as training for the track or road, 
having a fust class half-mile track to train on. At 
the head of the establishment is the grandly bred 
Hart Bobwell sired by the great Onward 2:23%, 
dam Nancy Lee (dam of Nancy Hanks 2:04, etc.), by 
Dictator 113. Among those in training is a four-year- 
old filly by Hart Boswell, dam by McKinney, second 
dam by Direct 2:05%. third dam by Steinway 2:25% 
(sire of six in 2:10), that is a fine individual as well 
as a fast pacer. She is a stout rugged looking thing 
and has two-minute speed. 

There is a full sister to this one, a year younger, 
that is equally as promising, but larger for her age. 
Here are a couple of fillies that are bred in tin 1 
purple and have speed to burn, and only wear a 
harness. 

A good looking three-year-old is a chestnut colt by 
Lecco 2:09%, dam a full sister to Thompson 2:14 by 
Boodle 2.12%. 

Lilly Dillon is a six-year-old bay trotting mare by 
Sidney Dillon, dam Lilly Stanley (dam of Rokeby, p, 
(3) 2.13%, Rect 2:16% and On Stanley 2:17), by 
Whippleton This is a very handsome mare and a 
fast trotter, has no record but has been a mile in 
2:13%. 

A buckskin mare, full sister to The Donna 2 : 07 % . 
is a fast pacer, although she may not equal the 
record of her noted sister. 

A two-year-old black gelding that ought to make 
a trotting race horse, as he carries the cross of Direc- 
tor 2:17 close up, being by Directum II (son of Direc- 
tum 2:05% and Little Witch by Director), dam by 
Secretary, son of Director. 

The swellest looker in the stable is a four-year-old 
daughter of Hart Boswell, dam by Gaviota (son of 
Electioneer), next dam by Echo. There was also a 
three-year-old filly by Highland C. 2:19%, dam by 
Hart Boswell, second dam by Stamboul, and a two- 
year-old colt by Kinney Lou 2:07%. The youngest 
trotter I saw at Laurel Creek was only a few days 
old, having been foaled January 12. It was a very 
handsome chestnut filly by King Dingee (son of 
Zombro 2:11 and Diavolo by Diablo 2:09%), dam by 
Secretary. Mr. O'Grady s [dace is only two miles 
from San Mateo and only two blocks from the station 
of Beresford on the Southern Pacific and comprises 
over 300 acres of rich valley and foothill land, plenty 
of shade and water, no wire, many paddocks and 
small fields, half a hundred box stalls, and is in fact 
the best equipped horse farm in the vicinity of San 
Francisco. 

C. C. CRIPPEN. 
o 

READVILLE TRACK MAY BE SAVED FOR 
RACING. 



Boston, Mass., Jan. 20. — Notwithstanding the pop- 
ular impression prevailing to the effect that there will 
be no more racing over the classic Readville track 
and that the track is to be dismantled and cut into 
building lots, it is reasonably certain that, after all, 
there will be a big race meeting over the "two-minute- 
course" this summer and that a year hence Readville 
will again be found in its accustomed place In the 
tracks of the Grand Circuit. 

The fact that no application was made by Readville 
for a place In the Grand Circuit this year has only 
tended to strengthen the erroneous impression that 
Readville races are a thing of the past. With an 
indebtedness of something like $75.1100 hanging over 
the track and a vote of the stockholders already 
passed, voting that the property be sold at auction 
as soon as the necessary arrangements and advertis- 
ing could be done, the directors of the New England 
Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, controlling the 
track, did not feel like making application for dates 
or in asking the stewards at their meeting in New 
York this week to delay the action on Rcadville's ac- 
count. 

In the last, few days, however, a definite plan has 
been formulated by a few of the association s more 
wealthy stockholders — by men like John E. Thayer, 
Chester W. Lasell and Arnold Lawson, who are well 
known in racing circles throughout the country — to 
finance the indebtedness and retain the track for the 
racing game. The association has stood ready to offer 
a bonus of $25,000 to anyone buying the track, either 
at. private sale or at auction, providing the purchaser, 
on the other hand would agree to save the track for 
racing purposes for at least five years. 

The men who stand ready to chip in and carry the 
track along as a private enterprise, for the pres- 
ent at least, will acquire title to the property either 
by private sale or at auction and will, being mem- 
bers themselves, rent the track at a nominal fee each 
year to the New England Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers' Association for whatever sort of a race meeting 
the organization may determine upon. The intrinsic 
value of the property as real estate will be Increas- 
ing all the time, while, if by any chance racing 
should again return to its old basis in Massachusetts, 
the plant, would Ik; immediately and very greatly en- 
hanced. 

There is no disposition on the part of anybody to 
conduct a meeting that shall conflict in any way with 
those of the Grand Circuit cities, nor will any 
$50 000 handicap race be attempted. Purses of $1,000 
and $1,200, with possibly one or two stake races, 
will mftke hp the program. 



HOW DAN PATCH IS TREATED. 



Harry C. Hersey, trainer and driver of Dan Patch. 
1:55, has written the following description of the 
daily care the champion pacer gets: 

"Dan Patch seems to have no age limit. The chain 
pion of all light harness horses established a new 
world's record each year for four consecutive seasons, 
and is now, although twelve years old, stronger and 
faster than ever, and is believed to be ready lot a new 
world's record. 

This fact has led to widespread discussion among 
horsemen. It has been generally agreed that Dan's 
great breeding and his unequalh d class as an individ- 
ual are not alone responsible. Scientific training and 
the most careful attention have had as much to do 
with Dan's continued great form. Just how much 
can be estimated from an interesting, and the only, 
interview ever given on this subject by Harry Her- 
sey, Dans trainer and driver since 1903, and the 
man who has driven the champion to fourteen world's 
records. The great trainer believes in doing instead 
of saying things, and it was only after much per- 
suasion that he was induced to make the following 
simple statement: 

Mr. Hersey said: "The success of Dan Patch 1:55 
is due largely to the care he receives both in the 
winter and during his campaigns. He has been tended 
by Charles Plummer during the last three years, and 
his untiring efforts and knowledge of how this great 
horse should be treated have been great factors in 
keeping the world's champion in splendid condition. 

"Dan's day begins at 5 o clock in the morning, 
both winter and summer, when he is fed four quarts 
of well-screened oats with two tablespoonfuls of 
International Stock Food, which is one of the ingred- 
ients of the champion's every meal. He always has 
a fresh bucket of water in his stall, and can drink 
when he likes. After finishing his morning meal 
he is 'cross tied' in the stall, the straw well shaken 
out, and fresh straw put in. 

He is brushed off, bandages removed, feet picked 
out, and prepared for his morning jog, which consists 
of five or six miles in the winter. After his jog he is 
brought to the stable, thoroughly cooled off with as 
few blankets on as will protect him. After his jog 
he is then returned to the stall, his legs are bandaged 
with woolen bandages and sheet cotton, feet washed 
out and about ten pounds of good clean timothy hay 
given to him, he being a very large hay eater. 

"Dan is then turned loose in the stall until 11 
o'clock, when he is given a feed of two quarts of 
oats and three quarts of bran made into mash. As 
soon as the noon meal is finished the feed box is re- 
moved from the box and thoroughly washed, and 
he is left alone to enjoy his afternoon nap, which 
he takes daily, and which lasts from one hour to one 
hour and a half. At 4:30 p. m. his stall is straight- 
ened up, and another ten-pound bunch of timothy hay 
with a fresh bucket of water, are given him. At 5 
p. m. he is fed four quarts of cooked oats and bran, 
two quarts of clean oats and two quarts of bran that 
has been mixed with boiling water and covered for at 
least two hours before feeding. After eating his meal 
the feed box is removed and washed and Dan is put 
away for the night. During meal hours the groom's 
assistant is in charge. Dan is never left alone, as 
Charley sleeps with him and the night watch goes 
on at 7 p. m. and remains until 6 a. m. During 
the season of exhibitions Dan is fed four times a 
day. The morning, noon and night meals are the 
same as in winter, but we give one more meal at 8:30 
p. m., consisting of a bran mash. The days that 
he goes his remarkable exhibition miles he is never 
tied to keep from filling up. but is allowed all the 
hay he will eat right up to the time the harness is 
put on him for his preparatory three miles. As soon 
as he finishes a fast mile he is taken to the stall 
and given an alcohol bath. This is well rubbed into 
the muscles and back, and is then scraped off to gel 
the lather and sweat out of him and to thoroughly 
cleanse his skin and hair. He is then rubbed lightly, 
legs well hand rubbed and bandaged with cotton 
bandages. He Is then covered with as light blankets 
as are safe, and walked for about twenty minutes, 
after which he is taken in and lightly rubbed to thor- 
oughly dry the hair, then taken out to walk again. 
The same operation continues for an hour and 
minutes or longer, if he gives evidence of not being 
thoroughly cooled out. When thoroughly cooled l);m 
is taken into his stall, legs washed out With Castile 
soap and warm water, feet packed and washed, legs 
nicely dried and sheet cotton and woolen bandages 
rolled on them. He is then covered with a shoulder 
piece or an extremely long towel, covering his 
shoulders entirely, and with a light woolen blanket 
over it. His feet are then packed, a generous bunch 
of hay and a hot bran mash concludes his luncheon 
and toilet for the night. The morning following an 
exhibition mile, if we are obliged to ship, Dan is not 
jogged, but placed in the cars and fed mostly bran 
mashes, and all the hay he will eat. In shipping he 
is backed into a narrow, padded stall that will just 
fit him so that he cannot lie down. His feet are 
packed and Hie floor of the car Is covered with 
sawdust, and he is not taken out until his destination 
is reached, even if the shipment is 1,200 miles. 

"This, has been Dan s daily care for the past four 
years, and under it has continually improved in spirit 
speed and strength until today he is more fit than any 
horse I ever knew anything about." 



Charles Taylor, the oldest trainer and drfver of 
trolling noises in (he Hulled States, is dead al his 
home in White Kiver Junction, Vermont. Taylor win 
born in Canada in 1806. He drove his last race when 
ho was 9<>. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



I Sal unlay, February 6, 1909. 



I NOTES AND NEWS | 

Pittsburg, Pa., is to give a big fair and harness race 
meeting this year. 

The Great Western Circuit will have a total of 
$485,000 in purses for the trotters and pacers this 

year. 

S. 11. Wright, of Santa Rosa, has sent his mare 
Sonoma Queen r» : 20. full sister to Sonoma Girl 2:05%. 
to be bred to Hon Voyage (3) 2:12%. 



The grass is six inches high in the California pas- 
tures, and is growing so fast that the horses will 
get mighty fat before they eat it down. 



Better get your stallion advertised in the Breeder 
and Sportsman's stallion number of February 27th. 
It will be one of the handsomest editions ever gotten 
out on this Coast. 



Dana Perkins, of Rocklin, has had his yearling 
colt by Zombro 2:11, dam Zaya by Bay Bird, reg- 
istered as Amorist 49167. This colt is in the Breed- 
ers Futurity for foals of 1907. 



In the sale ring fat is the best color. If you 
are consigning horses to auction you cannot sell 
your supply of hay at a greater profit than by feeding 
it to the horses before the sale. 



Henry Hellman hears nothing but good reports 
from the mares bred to Alconda Jay last spring. 
There will be a big crop of these youngsters. Henry 
expects to mark Alconda Jay this year as a four-year- 
old. 



Read over the partial list of horses consigned to 
the Second Annual Pleasanton Sale, which appears 
in Chase's advertisement this week. No sale ever 
had a better bred lot of trotters and pacers consigned 
to it than this one. 



Chas. De Ryder has consigned the Diablo mar.' 
Gertie A. 2:12% to the Pleasanton sale. Gertie A. 
'ook her record at the San Francisco Driving Club 

•aces two years ago. 



A bill is to be introduced in the Legislature provid- 
ing for seven district agricultural fairs for California. 
Nothing will improve the breeds of live stock and all 
farm products of the farm and mills like well con- 
ducted district fairs. 



John Quinn, who has been training a string of trot- 
ters and pacers at Sacramento will tak them to 
Chico April 1st. The Sacramento track, in spite 
of the heavy rainfall, was in use by the trainers every 
day but one in January. 



M. Henry, of French Camp, San Joaquin County, 
intends laying out a half mile track on his farm this 
spring on which he can work his troters and pacers. 
He has a number of fine prospects, and the soil of his 
farm will make a first class track. 



It' some member of the San Francisco Driving 
Club should secure the mare May 2:07% at Chase's 
Pleasanton Sale next month, there would be some- 
thing doing in the way of a contest at the next 
meeting of the club given thereafter. 



Mr. R. J. McKenzie of Manitoba has been visiting 
California this winter and was in San Francisco this 
week. Mr. McKenzie purchased a full brother to 
the trotter Danube 2:12% on a trip to Los Angeles 
a year ago, and the horse is now being trained by 
Havers James. 



Mr. J. HE. Jack, the lumber merchant of Bisbee, 
Arizona, has his three-year-old stallion Cochise, by 
Lecco 2:09%, dam Winnie Wilkes 2:17%, at his place 
in Bisbee and has already filled his book, limiting 
him to ten mares. Cochise is a very handsome black 
coll, large and stylish and has fine trotting action. 



Frank Overacker of Centerville. will take his four- 
year-old mare Fannie Easter by Arner 2:17%, to 
I'li-asanion next week, for a few months' training. 
Fannie Easter is out of a mare by Vasto 2:16, 
second dam by Robert McGregor 2:17%. and she is 
a fast pacer. She showed a mile in 2:25 as a two- 
year-old. 



The estate of Martin Carter, nominated eight 
mares in the California State Fair Futurity which 
closed February 2nd. The mares nominated are Ex- 
cella. Record Searcher, Louise Carter, Mamie R.. 
Irvington Girl, Mora Mac, Stambina and Bonnie 
Light. These mares will all be sold at the Pleasanton 
sale March 25th. 



Alsandra, who took a four-year-old trotting rec- 
ord of 2:12, and trotted a public trial in 2:09 last 
year, is attracting quite a lot of attention at Pleas- 
anton among the breeders. As he will only be 
allowed to cover ten mares this year, his book will 
doubtless fill early. He is a great bred one, being by 
Bonnie Direct 2:05%, dam Alix B. 2:24% by Nutwood 
Wilkes, second dam, a full sister to Little Albert 2:10 
by Albert W. 2:20, son of Electioneer. 



Twenty-Third, dam of Sterling McKinney 2:06%, 
was shipped to Los Angeles by her former owner. 
Capt. C. H. Williams, of Palo Alto, on Tuesday of this 
week. Twenty-Third is due to foal to Alconda Jay 
about the middle of March, and will then be bred to 
Zombro 2:11, before being shipped to the home of 
her owner, Mr. A. B. Coxe of Paoli, Penn. 



A mare by Brownie Direct 2:05%, out of a mare by 
Searchlight 2:03%, next dam a producing mare by 
Director and next dam Lida W. 2:18%, the dam of 
Nutwood Wilkes, is about as richly bred as one can 
find in this country. Bonnie Light is the name of 
this mare. She is in foal to Star Pointer 1:59% 
and will be sold at the Nutwood Farm dispersal on 
March 25th. 



The Livermore Horse Show has been set for Sat- 
urday, February 27th and it is to be the "biggest 
and best'' ever held in the Valley. The officers who 
will have charge are: President, H. M. Christensen; 
vice-president, Max Berlin; secretary, Theo. Gorner; 
treasurer, John Sweeney; grand marshal. Frank Fen- 
non; announcer, Wm. McDonald. 



The yearling which Mr. Frank J. Hellen of Penn 
drove will match against Jacob Brolliar's Best Policy 
colt, is by Sable McKinney (son of McNeer by Mc- 
Kinney and Sableton by Sable Wilkes), first dam 
Dirmedia by Director H., second dam by Brigadier, 
third dam by Norfolk. Those who have seen this colt 
say it is a good one. 



Dr. James Hammond, of Byron, has a little stock 
farm on which are nine horses, including young 
colts, all of his own breeding. He has youngsters by 
Nutwood Wilkes, Searchlight and other sires that 
are fine looking animals. His favorite buggy horse 
is a gelding by old Altamont out of his old mare 
Blue Bells by San Diego. There isn't a better road- 
ster in that section. 



Mr. H. W. Meek owns a yearling by Aerolite (3) 
2:11% out of the famous broodmare Cricket 2:10, 
dam of six standard performers. Cricket is by Stein- 
way and was the first mare to pace in 2:10. Mr. 
Meek will probably consign this colt with several 
others to the Pleasanton sale. It is certainly one of 
the best bred ones for a fast pacer that has yet 
been foaled in California. 



Mr. Alfred Boyle, of Tacoma, Washington, owns a 
nice bay stallion in Burion 2:29. a product of the 
Larrabee ranch. Mr. Boyl paid $1,020 for this horse 
at auction and got a bargain. Burion is by Alcone 
6780, son of Alcyone, and his dam is Belle, the dam of 
Pearl Fisher 2:18%, by Kisbar. Burion is standard 
and registered and a real show horse. Mr. Boyle re- 
cently solt a three-year-old by him for $1,500. 



Look out for the young Star Pointers this year. 
This is the first year for them in California, and 
the oldest are two-years-old, except one and that is 
technically a three-year-old as it was foaled in Sep- 
tember, 1906. As soon as Star Pointer reached Cal- 
ifornia in the fall of 1905, the late Martin Carter 
bred the mare Grey Witch by Nutwood Wilkes to him 
and the foal arrived the following September. In 
was a filly, just what Mr. Carter wanted, and had 
he lived this filly would have been used as a brood- 
mare, and mated with Lord Alwin. 



A new dodge in lighting a show ring was tried at 
the recent Denver stock show with complete success. 
Hitherto the floor of the show rings at nearly all the 
big shows in America have been covered with tan 
bark, which absorbs light and gives a dull cast to 
the entire ring. At Denver, the managers covered 
the ring with sawdust that had been dyed a grass 
green. It gave the arena a brilliant effect at night 
and was very grateful to the eye .in daylight. A 
pile of sawdust was simply sprinkled with a few gal- 
lons of commonly used dye, then turned over and 
over until every particle had absorbed the color. 



The Bon Voyage colts are trotting fast wherever 
heard from. John Quinn reports that the other day 
he drove Mr. L. H. Todhunter's two-year-old by Bon 
Voyage out of the dam of Hymettus (3) 2:08%, etc., 
a quarter in 33% seconds, hooked to a heavy car', 
and is certain the youngster can step a quarter in 
32 seconds hooked to a light sulky. Ted Hayes 
hitched his two-year-old Viaticum by Bon Voyage, 
dam Ruth Mary by Directum, to a cart the other 
day. The colt had been shod that day, having been 
barefoot and doing nothing for two months and he 
stepped a quarter in 38 seconds "easy as breaking 
«ticks." 



Another of the few remaining old time stage coach 
drivers of early California days died at Auburn, Pla- 
cer county on the 31st day of January. John Spaul- 
ding was his name, and he drove the coaches of the 
Overland Stage Company between Placerville in Cal- 
ifornia and Virginia City in Nevada, for several years 
prior to the completion of the transcontinental rail- 
road. Uncle John, as he was familiarly called, had 
been manager of the Soulh Yuba Water Company, 
operating in Nevada and Placer counties, and so able 
was his administiation that although he was com- 
pelled to retire from active business five years ago, 
his salary of $250 a month ran along as though be 
were still in charge and will continue to be paid to 
his daughter. He was 74 years old and a native of 
New York. 



The Denver meeting this year is to be in charge 
of Ed. Gaylord. 



A colt by Chimes out of a mare by Guy Wilkes, 
owned by C. B. Robbins, of Swedesboro, New Jersey, 
has been registered as Delphin M. Delmas 47781. 



A. L. Thomas of Benson, Neb., has succeeded the 
late Charles Tapp as superintendent of King Hill 
Stock Farm, St. Joseph. Mo. 



At Maybrook, a hamlet in Orange County, N. Y., 
the old stable in which Dexter 2:17%, was foaled 
and reared was destroyed by fire a few days ago. 



Surmise 2:15% by Sidney, is said to be very likely 
to get into the dead sire's 2:10 list this summer. 
Surmise has beaten his record over a half mile track 
and is a nice gaited trotter. 



Eddie McGrath, former driver of Frank Yokum 
2:05%, has recently bought of McFarland Park, 
Eatonville, N. J., a two and three-year old colt and 
filly by Owyho 2:07%, paying $3,000 for the pair. 



J. H. Bronson, New Haven, Conn., has purchased 
from Frank and Dick Wilson, Rushville, Ind., the fast 
and great race mare Aileen Wilson 2:02%, by Ar- 
rowood, at a reported price of $6,500. The mare will 
be trained by Dick Wilson again next season. 



Gott & Etter, Liberty, Ind., have sold to Eastern 
parties Maude Powell, bay two-year-old filly by Kla- 
tawah 2:05%, dam Belle Vara 2:08% (dam of Belle- 
vara Boy 2:14%), by Vatican, second dam Nell, dam 
of Tom Axworthy 2:07, and five others better than 
2:13. 



In a race for a wager the mare Blackbird covered 
the distance of 27 miles between Calgary and Oko- 
toks, Canada, in one hour and fifty-six minutes, and 
drew two men in a buggy. The wager her owner 
made was to beat two hours. The mare came in fresh 
and cooled out in fine shape. 



Dan Kinney, by Kinney Lou 2:07%, dam Queen C. 
by Nutwood Wilkes, second dam Queen by Venture, 
showed a mile in 2:20 over the Denver track last fall 
as a three-year-old. He is owned by J. M. Herbert, 
of Denver, who will race him in the slow classes this 
year. 



It is said that Chris Widemann of Gonzales, will 
move his broodmares and stallions to a fine farm near 
Kings City. The stallions owned by Mr. Widemann 
are the trotter Cassian 2:29^ by Mendocino, and 
the thoroughbred stallion Dewey. There are about 
fifty broodmares on Mr. Widemann's farm. 



A. nandrau. of Sanger, Cal., who bought. George 
G. by Homeward for $50, and after the gelding took a 
record of 2:12%, sold him for $15,000, has made 
another investment. He now owns a yearling colt by 
Diablo, dam by Junio, that he calls Sanger and has 
entered in the Breeders Futurity. It is being trained 
by Charles Middleton at the Fresno track. 



The old S. A. Brown stock farm, near Kalamazoo, 
Mich., once the home of such sires as Ambassador 
2:21%. Anteeo 2:16y 2 , Grand Sentinel 2:27%, etc., 
was sold at auction a few days ago by a Kalamazoo 
bank. The farm at one time was one of the largest in 
the country and raised and raced many fast ones, 
such as Vassar 2:07, Belle Vara 2:08%, Abnet 210%, 
Edenia 2:13%, etc. 



The advertisement of Mr. J. P. Baileau, of Spokane. 
Washington, appears in our columns. Mr. Baileau 
is a licensed starter of races in both the National 
and American Trotting Associations. Our friend 
C. A. Harrison, of Seattle, knows Mr. Baileau and 
has seen him start and says he is first class at the 
business, knows the rules, and is honest, sober and 
reliable. We therefore commend him to associations 
giving meetings this year. 



Mr. J. L. Charlton, of Ilkiah, reports that his mare 
Rose Thorn, trial 2:15, by Hawthorne, foaled a fine 
large filly on the 27th of January, sired by Sonoma 
Boy 2:20, full brother to Sonoma Girl 2:05%. This 
filly is entered in the Pacific Breeders Futurity for 
foals of 1909. Sonoma Boy, now owned by Mr. F. E. 
Alley, of Roseburg, Oregon, was formerly the prop- 
erty of Mr. Charlton, and took his record under the 
name of Dumont S. Mr. Alley changed his name to 
Sonoma Boy and he is so registered. 



Mr. George W. Chandler of Andover, Mass., has a 
remarkable mare named Nell, used by him in the 
wood and coal business, and this is what she does. 
When in the morning she is hitched to her coal cart, 
fiist she walks nearly an eighth of a mile to a drink- 
ing fountain, without any direction or assis'ance, and 
takes all the water she cares for; then of her own 
accord she goes by another street to the railroad 
depot, crosses the tracks, passes up to the sidetrack 
where the coal cars a